14 April, 2018

"Ukraine wants to sign FTA agreement with Turkey in 2018"

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"NATO wants to adopt Ukraine’s experience of countering hybrid aggression"

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13 April, 2018

"List of large privatization is planned to be approved on April 27"

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"India interested in technical and military cooperation with Ukraine – Ukroboronprom"

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12 April, 2018
SANDY FORREST Client Executive for Cyber Security at ATOS UGTI on Facebook In the age of cyber trust, robust cyber security is more important than ever According to government data, almost half of all UK firms were victim to a cyber attack in the 12 months leading to April 2017. High-profile attacks such as WannaCry shone a spotlight on vulnerabilities in the public sector too. With cyber security breaches regularly in the headlines, there are knock-on effects not only on how people think about their own security, but also on the organisations they entrust to safeguard their data. To find out more, we commissioned independent research with over 3,000 service users and customers looking at how attitudes to cyber security are changing. The results, published in our new report, The currency of Cyber Trust, reveal the importance of cyber trust in business today. Of the people we surveyed, 63% said that recent cyber attacks have made them more aware of the issue of cyber security. While this is probably no surprise, perhaps what’s more significant is that 58% also told us that cyber security is now a deciding factor when choosing which organisations they interact with. And this isn’t necessarily good news for all organisations: 38% of respondents said they do not trust organisations with their personal data.   The value of transparency The research highlights both the challenge public and private sector organisations now face to retain cyber trust and also the opportunities this presents, namely, to underpin wider trust in your business and act as an enabler for your digital strategy. Based on the findings, our report sets out steps that organisations can take to gain (or regain) the cyber trust of their customers. This might be something as straightforward as communicating your cyber security policies to your customers, informing them quickly about an attack, and being more transparent about steps to improve security protocols after the breach has occurred.   Help customers to help themselves We also learned of potentially dangerous knowledge gaps. Cyber security is a technical subject which, between the various acronyms, vectors and protocols, can appear overwhelming to people from a non-IT background – or even those who know their DDoS from their Trojan Horse. For example, we discovered that most customers (61%) don’t actively stay informed about the latest cyber threats, which means there’s an opportunity – if not a responsibility – for organisations to educate their customers about how better to protect themselves.   Integrating cyber security into user experience The good news is that most people are willing to compromise on user experience in return for enhanced cyber security, with only 17% not willing to compromise at all. Where the real opportunity lies is in improving cyber security and user experience in parallel. Customers are more likely to accept additional security measures if their digital experience is well designed. But for this, they need to understand the benefits to them, with the necessary guidance and information. As public concerns about cyber security increase, and with people now ready to walk away from services they don’t trust, there are advantages for organisations who are prepared to differentiate themselves. It’s a question of staying innovative, being transparent and enrolling customers in a partnership to protect both them and the cyber security of your organisation.     Sourse: https://atos.net/en/blog/age-cyber-trust-robust-cyber-security-important-ever

"Ukraine and Germany plan to hold business forum"

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"Ukraine imports over 1.7 thousand electric vehicles since start of year"

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11 April, 2018

"Space Industry of Ukraine exports about 50% of goods/services in 2017"

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"Ukraine's trade representative hopes to hold talks with United States about steel, aluminium duties"

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10 April, 2018
MARK RACZKIEWYCZ The Ukrainian Weekly’s in-country correspondent UGTI on Facebook Introducing the new Baltic blockchain hub that is banking on major interest from Ukrainian clients People might be sick of hearing about the rise of virtual currencies and their potential for economic disruption, but the use of the blockchain technology that underpins them is gaining traction. Ukraine features pre-eminently for mining the world’s so-called crypto currencies as its much vaunted information technology (IT) industry contrives uses for this unique software to ultimately build trust between citizens and their governments, while providing tools that offer security to business relationships and protect the integrity of crucial documents. This Ukrainian enthusiasm for all things blockchain-related was evident at the opening of the Blockchain Centre Vilnius in Lithuania in early 2018. This Centre is positioning itself to serve as a knowledge hub for the emerging technology in Europe. Part of a larger eponymous network that spans Melbourne and Shanghai, it hopes to attract the interest of a significant Ukrainian contingent. While acknowledging Ukraine as both an integral IT outsourcing destination replete with “talent” and where there is an “ongoing problem of confidence in public institutions,” Paulius Kuncinas, chairman of Blockchain Centre Vilnius, told Business Ukraine magazine that he wants the Baltic country’s hub to be a place for Ukrainians to feel comfortable and help them do business. “This should be a place to meet partners and somewhere they could raise capital and network. This is their home outside of Kyiv, Dnipro, Kharikiv, Lviv and Odesa,” he said of Ukraine’s largest cities where existing IT industry communities flourish.   Game-Changing Technology As the platform that drives virtual currencies such as Bitcoin, blockchain is a potential deal breaker and game-changer in both the public and private sectors. What exactly is blockchain technology? It is encrypted software often compared to either Lego blocks or pages in a book. It cannot be easily hacked or manipulated. Its practitioners say it is “immutable,” to use their terminology, because of the sequential nature of their blocks. To tear out a “page,” for example, is impossible without somebody noticing the intrusion on a particular block’s “fingerprint”. Each “chain” has its unique content code and comes referenced to its predecessor and successor, making data changes difficult. The technology relies upon a peer-to-peer relationship. It differs from the traditional client-server model whereby an administrator manages data and can easily make changes to it. In other words, for a hacker to infiltrate a blockchain, they would have to re-write the whole system, a labour-intensive effort that even the most sophisticated of the current artificial intelligence augmentative systems cannot accomplish. This is why the Ukrainian government is using the technology to manage its registry of farmland with the help of technology from BitFury Group, a global technology firm that has an office in Kyiv. The announcement of this initiative came in April 2017. By September, Ukraine’s Justice Ministry had started using the platform to auction seized assets and begun transferring state property and land registries. In this particular case, the technology helped create a ledger of transactions – a chain of blocks – to permanently record and track assets or transactions. This is a potentially crucial upgrade in a country rife with institutional corruption and suffering from numerous examples of shady business partners illicitly taking over businesses by doctoring land or business ownership titles with the use of dishonest notaries and judges. “In Ukraine, people don’t trust the government and there are in certain cases valid reasons for this,” Gleb Paienko, software senior project manager for Bitfury in Ukraine, told Business Ukraine magazine. “We tell our government interlocutors that with blockchain you can’t change data or remove it, so that when a new government is in place, they’ll have pre-existing records preserved.”   Ukrainians Leading Global Innovation Ukraine currently ranks among 14 global leaders in blockchain innovation, Ukrainian government advisor Kostantyn Yarmolenko told guests at the latest World Economic Forum in Davos. As home to Eastern Europe’s largest pool of programmers, Ukraine was specifically mentioned as a “network hotbed” in the Blockchain Research Institute’s report that its CEO and co-founder Don Tapscott also presented at Davos. Additionally, Ukraine helped contribute to the 45% of developers that helped launch “initial coin offerings (ICO)” in 2016 among former USSR republics, said Paienko of Bitfury. So far, the financial services sector uses the technology the most. The technology assists banks in areas of transparency, trade finance and as a payment system. Other commercial uses include securing provenance, patents and copyrights, said Kristof Van de Reck, Holland-based regional head of Europe and council member of the non-profit NEM.io Foundation. His foundation has developed the technology that a group of Australian farmers now use for tracking supply-chain logistics. Still, the technology “isn’t ready for prime time yet,” said European Central Bank financial coordinator Dirk Bullmann, because “there’s no level playing field. The technology is still looking for a catalyst.” Other potential uses include preserving or securing identification, licenses, certificates and voting, governance and “track and trace” of transactions or products,” added Van de Reck of NEM.io Foundation. Some want to use the technology to reverse the “expropriation of data” from consumers that financial and online social media companies have done, explained Swiss-based non-profit 20|30 & Pillar Project co-founder Tomer Sofinson. He wants to create a “single” virtual currency wallet controlled by the consumer and which data vendors, online or off, cannot access. This could allow customers to regain “control of their own information.” Because the technology is still at the trial-and-error stage, it is difficult discerning where the hype ends and where meaningful application begins, visionaries at the Vilnius event conceded. “It’s a ‘chicken or egg’ issue, really,” said Dr. Antif Ansar, program director at the Said Business School at Oxford University, who advised the government of Gibraltar on regulating the use of blockchain technology. The hype certainly drives interest in the technology. Just by mentioning that it will start using blockchain, “a company can raise its share price,” quipped Layla Dong, who flew to Vilnius direct from the World Economic Forum in Davos where she had been part of the Global Shapers Community. It also encourages charlatans and helps to fuel the proliferation of business scammers that launch ICOs without even using blockchain. To help prevent fraud, hubs around the world like the one that opened in Vilnius in January serve to educate and connect stakeholders, explained Davidson of Melbourne’s blockchain centre. “It is highly unlikely that anyone who comes to the Blockchain Centre here in Vilnius or in Melbourne for any period of time is going to invest in a scam,” he said. “Our physical location is a conduit for all members of society to come together such as European central bankers, cryptographers, new start-up businesses, legislators, and regulators. This (Vilnius hub) is going to be the right environment for people to look at this technology sensibly and create ideas.” In order for this exciting technology to blossom, firm foundations and sustainability are essential. The alternative could be another dot.com bubble, said Dr. Ansar of Oxford University. As one of the pioneer countries that are already putting early-stage blockchain technology to use, Ukraine in a good position to lead the global community when it comes to practical implementation, said Kuncinas in Vilnius. “The people of Ukraine deserve better. In that sense, blockchain could be a revolutionary tool for Ukraine,” he said. “It could have a huge impact in terms of overcoming trust issues.” According to Kuncinas, the resulting economic benefits could help to shape the country’s broader development. “Ukraine has a similar problem as Lithuania. It is slowly depopulating. The only way that countries can solve the problem of brain drain and emigration is by creating these kinds of jobs.”     Sourse: http://bunews.com.ua/economy/item/innovation-introducing-the-new-baltic-blockchain-hub-that-is-banking-on-interest-from-ukrainian-clients

"World Bank names conditions for economic growth in Ukraine"

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"World Bank keeps forecast for Ukraine’s GDP growth in 2018 at 3.5%"

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9 April, 2018

"MEP Boni to initiate closer EU-Ukraine cooperation on cybersecurity"

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"Trade between Ukraine and Belarus 15-16% up"

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7 April, 2018

"China’s CMEC and DTEK plan to build 200 mw solar plant in Ukraine, volume of investments exceeds EUR 230 mln"

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"MEP Boni to initiate closer EU-Ukraine cooperation on cybersecurity"

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6 April, 2018

"Ukraine issues first e-visa"

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"Energy Ministry next year to represent program of Ukraine's energy forecast balance"

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5 April, 2018
SERGIY VAKARIN UkraineIS Chairman Ukraineis on Facebook UGTI on Facebook Blockchain for cars and spacecraft, Spotcoin in Ukraine. The road ahead for Ukrainian IT In March I participated in MobiCoin launch at the MWC, met with NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik and ICO-ready Spotcoin founders in Ukraine and discussed blockchain, spaceborne computers and our cybersecurity apps   Cryptocurrencies and cars CEE region is known for most advanced blockchain solutions. The Blockchain Research Institute recently released “The Networked Hotbeds of Blockchain,” and its famous CEO Dan Tapscott published the map of the key 14 hubs for blockchain innovation in the world, including Ukraine, Estonia and Georgia. And a year ago Czech Republic became the world pioneer in allowing a cryptocurrency in car sales when Tesla retailer Alza announced they would accept bitcoin. Their success inspired Mayfair dealer Dadiani Fine Art to start UK’s “first luxury cryptocurrency exchange” that offers Formula One cars in partnership with Heritage F1. The company accepts bitcoin and selected altcoins. Four rare F1 cars were already sold for about £4 million in litecoin to a Chinese millionaire. Last month Daimler AG showed that car manufacturers can launch their own cryptocurrencies. Daimler, the giant that manufactures Mercedes-Benz presented the MobiCOIN project at the Mobile World Congress 2018. This new coin will be used to reward drivers for driving safely and smoothly at low speed. This was not the only cryptocurrency launched at the MWC. Japanese e-commerce giant Rakuten announced its own Rakuten Coin. The new cryptocurrency will allow loyal customers to buy goods and services from Rakuten globally, mitigating the exchange rate fees and helping the Amazon’s rival to spread its business worldwide. Soon after the MWC, Huawei announced development of blockchain-based smartphones.   Spotcoin presentation in Ukraine Cryptocurrency transactions, especially expensive car purchases, require reliable protection of digital identities. Upon return from the MWC to Ukraine, I discussed this issue with the founders of Spotcoin Tim Gick and Guram Rukhadze who came to Kyiv to present this new Georgia-based cryptocurrency. Spotcoin is designed to bridge the gap between the traditional banking sector and digital currency marketplace. The company started as an OTC clearinghouse for easy movement between fiat and cryptocurrencies. If you have a large amount of cryptocurrency, you may find it difficult to sell it. Spotcoin is intended as a stock market for fast purchases/sales of cryptocurrencies. Spotcoin is running an ICO later this year. The founders market it as kind of an eBay for digital currencies. Cooperation between two hubs of blockchain innovation, Ukraine and Georgia, would bring synergy to both countries. We agreed that Ukraine’s worldwide reputation as a reliable software hub will continue to grow. To build a reliable platform for digital currencies, good software support is essential, and Ukraine comes as a natural choice for Spotcoin’s office that will develop software for this cryptocurrency.   Blockchain starts a space journey Software plays an important role in space industry, and Ukrainian programmers are involved in international cooperation with global space giants – for example, they develop apps for NASA and write code for SpaceX launches. Now organizations like NASA and ESA explore possible uses of blockchain technology in space projects. NASA is teaming up with different companies to develop autonomous computing projects in space. Blockchain is one of potential solutions. At NASA Glenn, Thomas Kacpura’s team is experimenting with blockchain-based decentralized machine learning and artificial intelligence to design smart spacecraft with autonomous decision-making, without having to ask people back on earth. Blockchain is intended to link the deep space network. Autonomous work of spaceborne computers is essential for the future interplanetary trips. These computers should be capable to make decisions on data priority in communication with Earth, as bandwidth and connection reliability will be a bottleneck. At the MWC I visited the HPE pavilion with supercomputers (known as Spaceborne computers) that are undergoing testing at the International Space Station. Also, I met with Vodafone&Nokia’s Mission to the Moon project that will launch a 4G network in space, and presented our cybersecurity solutions. This was also a topic of my discussion with Randy Bresnik, the astronaut who took the Ukrainian flag to the ISS and brought it back to Ukraine. The Spaceborne Computer experiment was launched last year, soon after he took the command of the ISS. Cybersecurity is crucial for space projects, digital identities of car owners and for platforms like Spotcoin. In many of these projects, Ukrainian software will be the central element. GU     Sourse: https://global-ukraine.com/en/2018/03/blockchain-for-cars-and-spacecraft-spotcoin-in-ukraine-the-road-ahead-for-ukrainian-it/

"U.S. Senator Robert Portman: Ukraine needs to continue economic reforms"

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"Two more low-cost airlines may launch flights to Boryspil airport"

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4 April, 2018

"Mexico imposes anti-dumping duties on imports of steel pipes from Ukraine"

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"EBRD plans to implement 30 new financing projects in Ukraine in 2018"

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3 April, 2018
ALEX BART Managing Partner&Founder of ESCP UGTI on Facebook New Investment Climate in Ukraine with Empire State Capital Partners Recently Natalie Gryvnyak spoke with Alex Bart, founder and managing partner of Empire State Capital Partners, an investment bank in Kyiv. Tell me about the group Empire State Capital Partners. When was it created? What was the aim of its creation? Alex Bart: Thanks, Natalia. I am American, my Ukrainian partner Yaroslav Udovenko, and Martin Birch, who is British, formed Empire State Capital Partners in 2014. The three founding partners have more than 30 years’ direct experience gained solely in the Ukrainian corporate and investment banking arena. In 2014, we found some investment capital and started up Empire State Capital Partners with quite a diverse team. We built an independent American-style investment bank here in Ukraine, maintaining key multi-level relationships with the U.S. government, bulge-bracket investment banks, as well as American and European institutional investors and family offices. We date our formation from May 2014, and so every mid-May we host a high-profile investment conference which has seen attendance from the U.S. ambassador and leading figures from government and industry. By the way, we are still accepting registration requests from investment professionals for this year’s conference May 15-17 (http://newukraineevents.com/). Our Venture Capital arm is called ES Ventures, with strategic partners from Israel and Silicon Valley California, in the United States. I feel the best way for Ukraine to move forward is innovation, because of the great engineers and programmers here. For example, we closed a 500,000 U.S.-dollar deal into an Odessa-based company called Kwambio, which specializes in 3-D printing. This company successfully went through the TechStars Boston Accelerator program with great success. In January we were with them at the CES Consumer Technology conference in Las Vegas where they received extremely positive feedback from the likes of GE, Lockheed Martin, and Tesla. We also have an NGO arm called Business Incubator Group Ukraine (BIG.U), which facilitates the promotion of entrepreneurship and Small and Medium Enterprise (SME) development across Ukraine. Not just technology companies, but actually anything: like cafés or small production, small farmers, women’s entrepreneurship. BIG.U will be a consolidator, because right now there are quite a lot of low- and non-profit organizations—European programs, American programs, 500 different SME events on Facebook. We want to create a hub in each region with students, professors, and volunteers working in regional departments where you can just come in and get a direction about everything having to do with SMEs. Tell me about the new investment climate as you see it in Ukraine. Though challenges remain, Ukraine has seen real progress over the last few years. Increases in international reserves and reforms in financial services, including shuttering insolvent banks, contribute to Ukraine’s macroeconomic stabilization. Reforms have seen Ukraine rise on the Ease of Doing Business Index from a low of 152 in 2011 to 76 in 2017, with a 77% improvement in the regulatory environment in the same period. Right now we’ve got an active deal pipeline for FY 2018, and with growth projected to be about 3% in 2018, we’re optimistic about continued Year-Over-Year increases in FDI. We also just recently closed a deal with Bank “Vostok” for 8 million U.S. dollars for financing SMEs in Ukraine. That deal was financed through World Business Council and guaranteed by the U.S. Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC). We’re excited about the prospect of more OPIC-type deals, M&A subsidiary and bolt-on acquisitions, as well as big-ticket bond issuances. Thank you for this opportunity to introduce Empire State Capital Partners to your readership.

"Nestle to invest UAH 700 mln in Ukrainian factory"

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"Ukraine’s Mriya aircraft takes off for first commercial flight"

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2 April, 2018

"Ukraine-Belarus trade grows by almost 20% in 2017"

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"G7 ambassadors congratulate Ukraine on launch of healthcare reform"

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31 March, 2018

"Ukraine agrees to increase frequency of flights to Germany and Hungary"

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"United States’ assistance to Ukraine is larger than ever"

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30 March, 2018

"Ukraine to begin grain shippings to Qatar"

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"NBU intends to switch to passive currency interventions"

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29 March, 2018
OLEXANDR HONCHAROV Director of the Institute for economic development of Ukraine UGTI on Facebook In what sectors should Chinese or American invest to get profit in Ukraine? Ukraine's regulated market is very weak and small, but if we look at our low-quality bonded loans, we will see a two-digit yield Today, the wealthiest Ukrainians tend to spend their hryvnia savings, fearing high inflation and devaluation of the hryvnia. As the situation is very unsteady, nobody, except the National Bank of Ukraine, tries to predict the hryvnia exchange rate. Chairman of the National Bank Council (NBU) Bohdan Danylyshyn predicts that only by March-April 2018, hryvnia would stabilize. Of course, such an uncertain situation is really worrying. The treasury is emptying, the state debts are steadily growing, but at the panic should be stood down. The forecasts began to come true; in particular, at the end of the last year, I expected that in 2018 the NBU will have to increase the discount rate at least twice. Many experts did not agree with this view, they say, on the contrary, the interest rates will be lowered. From January 26, the NBU was forced to raise the discount rate by 1.5 percentage points (by 16 %). And what should the National Bank do when inflation increases? I want to remind once again that if the hryvnia depreciates by 1% (against the US dollar), then consumer prices grow by 0.2-0.3%. In such a situation, Ukrainian authorities should seek free $ 10-12 billion aid from the United States and the European Union by the end of 2018. For the West, this amount is quite small, especially taking into consideration the fact of pumping hundreds of billions of euros into Greece. European Union has a reserve fund of 750 billion euros, including 250 billion euros from the International Monetary Fund. However, instead of carrying out constructive negotiations with our Western partners, our Ministry of Finance is still making decisions on increasing state debt. It seems like the financial authorities believe that Ukraine just cannot survive without the IMF loans. At the same time, IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde met with President Petro Poroshenko in Davos. She focused on accelerating the pace of reforms for the sake of economic growth and raising the standard of living of Ukrainians. Reasonably, there is only one way out: Ukraine should involve transnational corporations that re-structure our economy in a new way. This is very important now, as Ukrainian markets suffer a huge deficit of investment ideas, which we could sell to large foreign investors (from China and the US). But who will fill sell Ukrainian business stories? Of course, our regulated market is very weak and small, but if we look at even low-quality bonded loans of our issuers, we will see a two-digit yield. In 2018, we should increase corporate bond issues, as their attractiveness will increase. The key idea for foreign investors is to trade the rapid growth of Ukrainian bonds. However, the risks of Ukrainian corporate bonds are quite high (for example, unexpected movements occur quite regularly). Well, there is even nothing to say about the initial public offerings (IPO) of Ukrainian issuers of the recent years. But this fact that causes the greatest perplexity, for example, among Chinese institutional investors, who began to enter Ukraine’s markets. Our Chinese colleagues have already realized that very few people understand how to shape the value of Ukrainian companies and what their market capitalization depends on. It is high time to raise the financial literacy of a new generation of our leaders. The state regulator should hugely liberalize the entrance conditions of the Ukrainian market. Finally, Ukrainian business should learn from the Chinese how to sell the future and brands. It is high time for a real revolution in Ukrainian organized markets. After all, the onset of even greater shocks in trade and in the economy of Ukraine is only a matter of time. Ukraine should take this challenge and be ready to realize smart and breakthrough solutions, especially in trade. Nobody will argue with the fact that trade and international trade are the most accessible and effective instruments of economic growth for Ukraine. According to experts, 1% of the growth in foreign trade can result in 1.5-2% of Ukraine's GDP growth and citizens' incomes. With the help of the market mechanisms, trade increases choice for us and contributes to improving the quality of production, conserving natural resources and equalizing the relative wealth of the nation.     Sourse: https://112.international/opinion/where-could-chinese-or-american-invest-in-order-to-get-profit-in-ukraine-25070.html

"Poroshenko signs law on simplification of oil and gas production"

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"Small business optimistic about prospects in 2018 – EBA research"

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28 March, 2018

"Ukraine, Israel to sign free trade area agreement in near future"

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"Ukraine joins Global Beneficial Ownership Register"

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27 March, 2018
VICTORIA VLASENKO Editor at Innovation House UGTI on Facebook Ukraine preps to fight off smart viruses and cyber attacks When will computer viruses have any intelligence? Will Ukraine be ready for this? Innovation House has made some inquiries about this issue. Over the past few years Ukraine has turned into the testing ground for cyberweapon. Ukrainian companies had to face attacks that are new to the world. Thus, in December 2015 hackers have used BlackEnergy virus to interfere in the operational process of energy producers. This has caused disruption in the electricity supply to hundreds of thousands of consumers. In June 2017 Ukraine faced with the largest in its history virus attack: virus called Petya/NotPetya has infected Maersk, Deutsche Post, WPP, and other major corporations in 65 countries across the world. It should come as no surprise that Ukraine has been robustly trained of how to meet attacks of the future. World’s best experts would have come here to study the threats. Some companies of international renown could open their competence centers here. But this is not the case. Ukraine still lagging behind global cybersecurity ratings. Thus, according to the report of the International Telecommunication Union for 2017, Ukraine’s cybersecurity level was lower than in Moldova, Tajikistan, Georgia, Russia. So what are the reasons of such standing behind? Innovation House has visited IDC Security Roadshow 2018 conference and tried to sift this issue to the bottom.   Security gets smarter… viruses too On February 9 the 23rd Olympic Winter Games officially kicked off in Pyeongchang, South Korea. More than 27 million spectators were watching the ceremony. However, it has not been without challenges. Сyberattack hit systems, which led to 12 hours of downtime on the official website, the collapse of Wi-Fi in the Pyeonchang Olympic stadium, and the failure of televisions and internet in media rooms. Virus stole passwords and looked for the fastest path to spread along the system. “It is not artificial intelligence yet, but it already has some automatic learning elements,” – Volodymyr Ilibman, Security Account Manager at Cisco, said. Petya/NotPetya virus that has attacked Ukraine in summer 2017 has also shown some sparks of “intelligence”. It was spreading from one computer to another in the form of an avalanche. “Every sign indicates that sooner or later both viruses and useful software will have some “intelligence”. The fight against such viruses will be incredibly tough. Smart cybersecurity systems powered by artificial intelligence and machine learning will confront them,” – Mr. Ilibman said. The study conducted by Cisco shows that 83% of companies around the world are going to cut their security costs through automation. 92% of IT-experts believe that behavioral analytics will help to identify illegal intruders. Ukrainian companies may find themselves unprepared to attacks of the future. Experts say that despite previous experience, little attention is paid to the security issues.   We have experience, but have no labor power “In the old days we walked along these streets and had no fear, now we are walking along these very streets and are frightened,” – this is what Victor Zhora, member of Ukrainian Information Security Group, said about the readiness of business to attacks. Volodymyr Styran, co-founder at Berezha Security, explained the words of his colleague in such a way: having learned from the experience, the business started to be more afraid of attacks, but did not start to pour considerably more cash and resources in security. For instance, only two customers have addressed to his company after Petya. These are large businesses that came for a comprehensive audit and understanding of how to reorganize their infrastructure and raise the staffing level. A total of several dozens of customers came to Berezha Security during four years of company’s existence. However, there are other examples too. Stanislav Pokhylko, Business Development Manager at Oberig IT, told that amount of work performed by his company has increased after Petya. “Our experts were working days and nights to restore the business systems of many major Ukrainian companies. And then these companies became our key customers,” – he said. Security experts complain that Ukraine is in the serious shortage of qualified personnel. Therefore, even if there is a will to do something, there is no understanding what exactly shall be done and how to utilize funds most efficiently. The system of education is unable to train personnel, business pays no enough attention to this issue. “Security teams held meetings, conferences, engage in self-education with little or no involvement of business,” – Volodymyr Styran explained. It is not yet fully understood by business that cyberwar has started and that it is endangered.   New targets According to Cisco, in 2018 malicious persons will actively explore industrial automated facilities in search for vulnerable areas there. This is sad news for Ukrainian companies. “We have analyzed Ukrainian companies and found only age-old systems there. Controllers that are used for ventilation system control, video controllers – all this is vulnerable to attacks,” – Volodymyr Ilibman, Security Account Manager at Cisco, said. Even strategic assets – such as telecommunication companies or energy producers, are not always properly secured. As alleged by Innovation House’s source in Ukrenergo, the enterprise shall raise tariffs to steer some money to cybersecurity. And since the company operates in a non-competitive market, all tariff escalations are being done through the National Commission for State Regulation of Energy and Public Utilities. “First of all, in our country consumers are supersensitive to raising of tariff rates. Secondly, when the issue of where to spend money is raised – for cybersecurity or to provide inhabited localities of Anti-Terrorist Operation Zone with electricity, then, sure thing, preference is given to the latter,” – the source in Ukrenergo said. Volodymyr Styran believes that, in theoretical terms, it would be good to connect privately owned strategically vital enterprises to state CERTs – Computer Emergency Response Teams. “But having realized that Security Service of Ukraine may creep anywhere, private companies will never accept such cooperation,” – added he. Banks have positive experience in doing business with the state in the cybersecurity field. “Thanks to interaction with CERT via National Bank of Ukraine we receive notifications when cyberattack are conducted and when some addresses shall be blocked,” – Max Moloshaga, Chief Information Security Officer at Piraeus Bank, said. No confidential information is transferred in this case. What banks do is only inform each other about any changes. So, as a matter of fact, National Bank of Ukraine has no connections to banks, except for its own electronic payment system. According to Max Moloshaga, this year Ukraine is going to open 5 different CERTs that will inform companies connected to them about cyberthreats. According to Cisco, in 2018 various smart devices will also be target for hackers. Illegal intruders make botnets (network of viral-infected devices) from gadgets, video cameras, digital video recorders. Mirai is the most famous botnet. It unites hundreds of thousands of devices. Since the end of 2016 it has conducted several attacks, inclusive of on the only external Internet channel in Liberia, which resulted in a situation where entire country was without internet.     Sourse: https://innovationhouse.org.ua/en/statti/ukrayna-gotovytsya-k-umnym-vyrusam-y-kyberatakam-budushhego/

"Trade between Ukraine and India 19% up, reaches $2.8 billion in 2017"

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"Fitch re-states 3.2% economic growth in Ukraine in 2018"

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26 March, 2018

"Ukraine’s exports of cultivated berries grew 19 times over past four years – expert"

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"Ukraine raises renewable energy facilities by 2.4 times in Q1, 2018"

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24 March, 2018

"Trump signs U.S. budget providing for $620 million to Ukraine"

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"PM Groysman: We will restore roads in Ukraine in 3-5 years"

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23 March, 2018

"MP Taruta proposes to create national innovation agency for technical support of startups"

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"Ukraine, France can increase mutual trade turnover up to $3 billion"

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22 March, 2018
LUBOMIR TASSEV Author at Bitcoin.com UGTI on Facebook Ukraine to Legalize Crypto Mining as Economic Activity The government in Kiev has taken concrete steps to legalize cryptocurrency mining. Ukraine’s Minister of Economy has ordered several ministries, agencies, and the National Bank to prepare the documents necessary to include mining in the state register of economic activities. Ukraine’s legislature does not seem to be in a hurry to adopt new crypto legislation, but the executive power in Kiev has taken matters into its own hands. At a meeting on Thursday, the Minister of Economic Development Stepan Kubiev ordered several other departments and agencies to do what’s necessary to include cryptocurrency mining in the state classifier of economic activities. The ministries of economy, finance, justice, energy, the agency responsible for the e-government and the Ukrainian statistical service should prepare a draft document to amend the register. The National Bank of Ukraine (NBU) and the Security Service (SBU) have also been invited to participate. Kubiev was quoted in a press release as saying: "By adding the crypto mining sector to the classifier, we will bring it out of the shadow economy and collect more budget revenues." The Minister of Economic Development pointed out that the legalizing of the mining industry may reduce the outflow of qualified IT professionals from Ukraine. Stepan Kubiev believes the measure will also ease the pressure on the crypto community in the country.   The Rada Is Lagging Behind the Government The initiative of the Economic Ministry is by far not the first attempt to legalize a crypto-related activity in the country. Cryptocurrencies were discussed during a cybersecurity meeting in January. The National Security Council set up a working group tasked to finalize regulations pertaining to the circulation of digital coins and the taxation of crypto transactions. Ukraine’s Cyberpolice unit has also called on government institutions to either legalize cryptocurrencies, or ban them. The country’s justice minister Pavel Petrenko has stated that cryptos, like bitcoin, should be brought into the legal field. The State Financial Monitoring Service has already announced its official position on cryptocurrency matters. Ukraine’s parliament, however, has not made any significant progress towards adopting the necessary legal framework. Three drafts have been introduced in the Verkhovna Rada since October. The first bill defines cryptocurrency as property that can be exchanged for goods and services. The second draft law states that cryptos are financial assets. A third, supplementary bill amends the tax code to introduce tax exemptions for profits and incomes from crypto trading and mining. Some reports in February suggested that Ukrainian legislators may separate crypto mining and cryptocurrencies in the new legislation. According to the latest information on the website of Ukraine’s legislature, Finance Minister Olexandr Danilyuk was expected to discuss the bills on the circulation and stimulation of cryptocurrencies with members of the Finance and Banking Committee. The announcement of the hearing was published on February 7, however, no details were released after that.     Sourse: https://news.bitcoin.com/ukraine-to-legalize-crypto-mining-as-economic-activity/

"British-Ukrainian maritime industries forum held in Ukraine (Odesa)"

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"US to increase spending on support for Ukraine"

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21 March, 2018

"Ukraine, Britain to increase cooperation in cybersecurity"

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"Ukraine among world's three cheapest countries to live"

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20 March, 2018
FEBIN JOHN JAMES Writer in Innovation, Technology, Bitcoin on Medium UGTI on Facebook Here Is the Epic Future Blockchain Is Going to Create I have been following Blockchain for quite a while now. I understood the technology was innovative. But, I always wondered if it was hyped ? Diving deep into the field and interacting with thinkers assured me it wasn’t. Few insights written here, surfaced in my conversation with the Marketing Director of Vanywhere ,Gil Ram (Thank you Gil).   Open Business It’s actually called Decentralised Autonomous Organisation, I use “ Open Business” to make it sound simple. Open Source communities which are the backbone of organizations like Linux, Google, etc have the least or no politics. I am not talking about the organization but their projects For example, Hyperledger is a project by Linux Foundation. It will help you build applications for private Blockchain. People around the world contribute to this project. It doesn’t matter who you are or what you are if you do good work, your code will be merged to the source. You are solely recognised for your work. I have observed people who know how to play cheap politics overpower people who work hard. In a Decentralised Autonomous Organisation, everyone’s work will be recorded on a transparent Blockchain. Your salary would be provided by the system which evaluates your work. Open Business will have the future of Open Source projects. Anyone anywhere with a business idea could start a Decentralised Organisation. Anyone could be a part of it, a programmer could be automatically added to the system based on his git profile. Every member of the organisation would be paid solely based on what each one brings to the table.   The Future Is Going to Be Great For Producers You might have been already bored by the words “Eliminating middleman”. Let me tell you why it is a big deal. If I have to sell a book on Amazon, they take 50% of the sale as commission. Writing a book is hard work. It would take months to write a book. It would take double the time to find a publisher. These publishers have their own biases (JK Rowling Turned Down By 12 Publishers), even if your work is good it would never see the light. In case you get lucky and your book was published. The majority of the cut goes to the publisher. If you self-publish the book you have to break your sweat on marketing it. On top of that seeing Amazon take a huge cut is really painful. Only a few people dare to fight these challenge and become producers. Producers in almost every industries are exploited. The vegetables you ate today was produced by a farmer. In India, most farmers live in poverty. Datatery Popat Ghadwaje, 42, committed suicide after days of hushed chanting “the sky betrayed”. We can’t control the sky. But, giving a good deal of their hard work is a must. Governments try to solve the problem by giving farmers easy/reduced loans or pensions. These things don’t work. We need to go to the root of the problem and address it. We need system thinking here. We need a system that enforces farmers to get properly rewarded for their hard work. Middleman is hungry for power, fame, and money. Blockchain replaces them with computers. Computer systems are not hungry for power, fame, and money (Except for Bitcoin). Can a computer system replace middleman? What does a middleman do? He finds producers and consumers, buys from the producer for less and sells it to the consumer for a higher price. This can be easily replaced by a program, except the computer will give the producer a reasonable price. It’s also important that the program is transparent and not controlled by an individual. This system is what the Blockchain enables. The future is going to be great for writers, composers, singers, farmers, or producers in general.   What about freelancers? Upwork takes 25% of my earnings, if I earn $1000 for a project, they take $250. That is a substantial amount! So how does Blockchain help? Upwork has infrastructure cost, they need to pay for their server, database, maintenance, etc. On a public blockchain like Ethereum, the infrastructure cost is reduced drastically. Reading data from Ethereum is free. On a centralized infrastructure which Upwork is based on, the more the people, more servers to handle the load and more money is needed. On a decentralised network, more the people, less money is required because the load is used to favour the Blockchain network. On a blockchain based platform, the fee can be as less as 4%–2%. I have to only pay around $40 or $20 as commission. That’s drastically less compared to $250.     Sourse: https://hackernoon.com/here-is-the-epic-future-blockchain-is-going-to-create-afe167c90568

"Antonov State Enterprise has 85% rise in net profit in 2017"

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"MPs offer 10-15 year preferences for developing production of electric cars in Ukraine"

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19 March, 2018

"Poroshenko discusses with Kuwait’s defense minister prospects for military and technical cooperation"

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"Qatar and Ukraine signs visa-free agreement"

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17 March, 2018

"Klimkin, Rasmussen to discuss security in Ukraine"

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"Foreigners investing at least EUR 100,000 in Ukraine will be able to get long-term visa"

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16 March, 2018

"EBRD will finance up to 20 bio-energy projects in Ukraine"

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"Mining to receive own code in Ukrainian classification system to stimulate crypto economy in Ukraine"

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15 March, 2018
OLEKSIY NASADYUK Head of the Top 50 Leading Law Firms of Ukraine annual research program UGTI on Facebook Ukrainian law firms seek new niches in booming bitcoin and it sectors The latest annual Ukrainian legal industry analysis finds law firms looking ahead with a growing focus on the fast-emerging crypto currency sector and other IT-related niche segments as the post-Maidan market for legal services continues to evolve. The legal industry in Ukraine continues to play a key role in the reform processes taking place in the country, both in terms of directly contributing to the reform of the judiciary and in response to the fast-evolving economic climate. The latest edition of the “Top 50 Leading Law Firms in Ukraine” survey, conducted by Yuridicheskaya Practika publishing house annually since 1997 and published this month in English-language format by Business Ukraine magazine, reveals a legal sector firmly on the road to recovery following the slump of 2014-15. It is also an industry seeking to reinvent itself in order to meet the changing demands of Ukraine’s shifting economic landscape.   Contributing to Ukraine’s Post-2014 Transformation The past year has been a particularly dynamic one for law firms practicing in Ukraine. Along with developments in the legal services industry, the professional community has also been intricately involved in the broader national process of judicial reform. Notably, in 2017 practicing lawyers were able to put themselves forward as candidates for the new-look Supreme Court, with nine candidates eventually becoming judges following a lengthy selection process. The effectiveness of Ukraine’s recalibrated Supreme Court will be one of the key issues to monitor over the coming year. It is part of the wider judicial reform process central to Ukraine’s post-Maidan transformation. “The key challenge for lawyers and for the whole of Ukraine is the pace and success of judicial reform. This will directly affect the investment attractiveness of the country. When the prospects for domestic and international investors of Ukraine become clearer, we can expect to see significant economic growth. This growth will also impact the legal market,” says Asters law firm Managing Partner Oleksiy Didkovskiy.   Niche Appeal While traditional legal sector focuses such as litigation, corporate and tax law are still the most profitable segments of the market, there are signs of a shift towards specialization amid growing levels of interest in emerging fields of practice connected with tech innovation and the most impressive sectors of the Ukrainian economy. This acclimatization fits well with the Ukrainian legal services industry’s famously well-versed adaptation ability. Indeed, the Ukrainian legal business is so adept at changing step to accommodate economic and political turbulence that many professionals prefer not to talk in terms of difficulties but rather to speak about crisis opportunities. As the industry continues to recover from the lows of 2014-15, market analysis points increasingly towards the appeal of niche sectors. The most profitable niches at present include energy and agriculture – both sectors that have witnessed significant increases in activity since 2014. The most striking current trend is the growing popularity of IT-related legal services. This reflects the rising importance of the IT sector for the Ukrainian economy as a whole, as well as the rapid physical expansion of the sector. The emphasis on technical innovations extends to the sphere of legal services connected to bitcoins and crypto currencies, while crossing over into the Legal Tech sector. Ukrainian legal services professionals are now regularly speaking about Legal Tech in the context of industrywide modernization, with bots carrying out tasks like patent research and producing draft contracts. The vast majority of Ukraine’s legal market participants have now come to recognize the futility of ignoring technological progress in their field, and the most forward-looking market players are actively looking to introduce artificial intelligence tools and other innovations into their day-to-day operations. “Legal consulting in the IT sector and FinTech innovations both look like attractive prospects for 2018 and in a longer term perspective. Considering the ongoing digitalization of business and the pace of development, today this sector is one of the most prospective for everyone including for lawyers,” says Antika law firm Managing Partner Alexey Kot. The booming world of crypto currencies has rarely been out of the headlines over the past year and Ukrainians have been among the most responsive audiences to the opportunities presented by this emerging financial sector. Unsurprisingly, this focus has also made itself felt in the legal industry. “The market is seeing demand for legal support for transactions with ICO (Initial Coin Offering) elements and IT solutions involving blockchain technologies. There is also interest in services related to the investigation of fraud in these spheres,” says Sayenko Kharenko law firm Partner Vladimir Sayenko. Meanwhile, according to Lavrynovych & Partners law firm Managing Partner Maksym Lavrynovych, we can expect to see significant development of legal services protecting the rights of crypto currency miners in Ukraine over the coming two to three years. “The current absence of a legal response to issues related to mining and crypto currencies is the prerequisite for this growth,” he explains.   Industry Overview Market analysis identifies a somewhat paradoxical situation in the personnel sector of Ukraine’s legal services market. On the one hand, the market appears to have an oversupply with legal experts, but on the other hand, many law firm partners note the difficulties of finding lawyers who meet all their requirements. This is particularly true when it comes to niche specializations. We can expect this picture to develop in the coming years as lawyers and law school graduates seek to hone their skillsets to meet the needs of the industry more specifically, but it is unlikely to change significantly in 2018. While there is clearly an expanding market for lawyers with niche skills, the levels of movement within the industry are relatively modest at present. Indeed, more than half the employees from surveyed law firms have not changed their place of work for the past three years. The portrait of a leading law firm in Ukraine has not changed much over the course of the past year. Based on the latest survey results, it is more than sufficient to have a team of 25 to 30 lawyers in order to manage a top law firm in Ukraine, while less than half this number will suffice to achieve success in the boutique category. However, it is worth noting that the three law firms occupying the top spots in this year’s Top 50 ranking all have more than 80 lawyers on their staff. In terms of senior management, law firms featured in the Top 50 have an average of five to six partners. Just two of the Top 50 have more than ten partners, while at the other end of the scale, 13 law firms have three partners or fewer. Overall, the average ratio of partners to salaried lawyers across all surveyed law firms is one to six. According to the results of this industry survey, Ukraine’s legal sector is a particularly experienced segment of the Ukrainian economy. Almost two-thirds of surveyed lawyers, or 62.5%, have legal industry experience of more than five years, while 34% can boast over a decade of practicing law in Ukraine, and 11.9% are real veterans with 15 years or longer under their belts. This creates the impression of a mature and adult legal services sector, but it is also important to note the role played by young specialists. With the industry emphasis slowly but surely shifting towards new tech-related segments and other niche markets, younger market entrants may soon find themselves in growing demand – assuming they have acquired the requisite skills to tap into the needs of the evolving industry.     Sourse: http://bunews.com.ua/economy/item/ukrainian-law-firms-seeking-out-new-niches-in-tech-sector

"Ukraine’s investment potential in renewable energy estimated at EUR 12 bln – Zubko"

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"Ukraine plans to start exporting wheat to China and Vietnam"

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14 March, 2018

"Austria invested $1.3 billion into Ukraine’s economy last year"

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13 March, 2018
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Civil: a Marketplace for Sustainable Journalism I am excited about the opportunity to help Civil (https://joincivil.com/) organize an event in Washington, DC and wanted to introduce readers of the UGTI email to this important company in advance of its launch in the spring of 2018. Civil is a Marketplace for Sustainable Journalism that recognizes the ad-driven revenue model that traditionally funded quality journalism has not translated to the digital economy and is leveraging blockchain technology to ensure journalism remains a strong in its critical role as a fundamental pillar of free, democratic societies, and newsrooms around the world. The Civil news platform launches in May, their our core pillars are local, international, investigative and policy – four of the most underserved areas in journalism today. They have garnered significant interest from journalists and readers, with coverage by Columbia Journalism Review, Nieman Lab, the Chicago Sun-Times and Fast Company and encourage you to check them out.

"Ukraine and Saudi Arabia plan to launch production of AN-132 aircraft"

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"China's Xinjiang Beiken starts drilling first well for Ukrgazvydobuvannia"

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12 March, 2018

"EBRD allocates EUR 25.9 mln for solar power plants’ construction in Vinnytsia region"

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"EU to provide EUR 1 bln in loans for Ukraine - Mogherini"

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10 March, 2018

"NATO officially recognizes Ukraine's Euro-Atlantic aspirations"

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"Poroshenko to meet with Vice President of the European Commission Federica Mogherini on March 12"

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9 March, 2018

"European Commission approves new EUR 1 bln assistance program for Ukraine"

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"EU, Ukraine launch five projects on decentralization of local government"

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8 March, 2018
CHRISTOPHER MILLER Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty correspondent based in Kyiv UGTI on Facebook What's Ukraine Doing To Combat Russian Cyberwarfare? 'Not Enough' KYIV - Dmytro Shymkiv fidgeted in a chair as his boss, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, testified via video linkup from a few doors down in the Kyiv trial of his exiled predecessor, Viktor Yanukovych. A big part of Shymkiv's job as deputy head of the presidential administration is focused on the cybersecurity of the president's office and the country. At this particular moment on February 21, his most important task was to keep the signal up and clear so Poroshenko could speak uninterrupted during the televised treason trial. "I'm very worried about cyberattacks," Shymkiv confessed to RFE/RL as the president delivered his testimony. With one eye glued to a screen showing Poroshenko and the other on his constantly vibrating mobile phone, which flashed updates from his IT team, Shymkiv said he feared a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack by Russian hackers that could take the video feed offline. "It's happened before," said Shymkiv, who before joining the government in 2014 was general manager of Microsoft Ukraine, referring to past DDoS attacks timed to disrupt presidential appearances.   Testing Ground Before Russian hackers allegedly targeted the United States and its 2016 presidential election, they were accused of taking aim at Ukraine and even its own presidential vote in May 2014 -- and with a lot more than just DDoS attacks. For its part, Russia has denied cyberattacks against Ukraine or the United States. But authorities here and in Washington attribute the attacks to Russia. They say they haven't stopped and are expected to continue. In fact, they say Russia is using Ukraine as a cyberwar testing ground, or as Wired described it in a lengthy and detailed report on the matter last year, "a laboratory for perfecting new forms of global online combat." Yet, for a country that is such a persistent target, Ukraine remains largely "unprepared" for cyberattacks from the likes of Russian and other skilled hackers, Shymkiv conceded. In separate interviews, Ukraine's chief of Cyberpolice and members of a prominent pro-government hacker team agreed; while acknowledging that the country has made some progress on the cybersecurity front, they suggested or said outright that its defenses are nowhere near where they should be as a regular target of cyberattacks. They cited poor communication between state institutions, a resistance to change, a confused policy approach to cyberdefense, and a lack of funds to recruit skilled personnel and buy much-needed equipment.   Ukraine Hit 'Every Day' Ukraine has been locked in an undeclared war with Russia since 2014, when the Kremlin annexed the Crimean Peninsula and fomented a shooting war in eastern Ukraine that has killed more than 10,300 people and is grinding into a fifth year. The war is being fought not only in the literal trenches but in cyberspace, through disinformation, fake news, and of course, cyberattacks. Since 2014, suspected Russian hackers have taken aim at critical targets in Ukraine with ever-growing sophistication. Ukraine's chief of Cyberpolice, Serhiy Demedyuk, said in an interview with RFE/RL that it was difficult to track Russian cyberattacks here because they occur "every day." "What we see is that Ukraine really is a [Russian] test site for malicious software," Demedyuk said in his office on the outskirts of Kyiv on February 21. In December 2016, Poroshenko claimed Ukraine had been struck by 6,500 cyberattacks on 36 targets in the previous two months, most of which Kyiv attributed to Russian aggression. His government has not provided more up-to-date statistics. While attribution can be difficult, Demedyuk and Shymkiv said Ukraine has managed to directly link Russia to most cyberattacks, citing the characteristics of the attacks and their timing; many occur on historically significant dates in Ukraine, or just before or during holidays, thus maximizing the effect. Two such cyberattacks targeted Ukrainian power plants ahead of holidays in December 2015 and December 2016, and left hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians without electricity for hours. Last year, Ukraine's Boryspil and Odesa international airports were hit by cyberattacks at the height of tourism season, along with the Kyiv subway's ticketing system, supermarket checkouts, bank ATMs, and the radiation-monitoring system at the defunct Chornobyl nuclear power plant. Luckily, those attacks caused more confusion than damage and potential crises were averted. But ransomware attacks dubbed Petya, NotPetya, and Bad Rabbit also ripped through the country, crippling businesses for days or weeks. NotPetya, in particular, spread to 64 countries, including Poland, Germany, Italy, and Russia, and caused billions of dollars in damage. The U.S. and U.K. governments both released extraordinary statements attributing NotPetya to the Russian military's cyberarm. White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders went further, calling it "part of the Kremlin's ongoing effort to destabilize Ukraine," which "demonstrates ever more clearly Russia's involvement in the ongoing conflict." Indeed, experts say evidence in many of these cyberattacks points back to the same Kremlin-linked hackers believed to have targeted the 2016 U.S. election. And they fear these may be only the beginning, as Russia continues to test new cyberwar methods -- where else -- in Ukraine.   More To Come The U.S. intelligence community "expect[s] that Russia will conduct bolder and more disruptive cyberoperations during the next year, most likely using new capabilities against Ukraine," read a worldwide threat assessment authored by Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and published on February 13. "The Russian government is likely to build on the wide range of operations it is already conducting, including disruption of Ukrainian energy distribution networks, hack-and-leak influence operations, distributed denial-of-service attacks, and false-flag operations." And Coats, a former senator appointed by President Donald Trump to be the United States' top intelligence official, said it was expected that once Moscow perfects new tactics in Ukraine, it will turn them on Western countries. "In the next year, Russian intelligence and security services will continue to probe U.S. and allied critical infrastructures, as well as target the United States, NATO, and allies for insights into U.S. policy," he said. Coats reportedly told a congressional committee the same day the report was released that he had already seen evidence Russia was targeting U.S. midterm elections in November. "Frankly, the United States is under attack," Coats added, according to Reuters. Many experts believe the United States and its European allies are woefully unprepared for future cyberattacks and have called for defenses to be strengthened.   Ukraine's 'Vulnerabilities' Exposed In boosting their own defenses, U.S. and European officials might look elsewhere for inspiration than Ukraine, which has struggled to batten down its proverbial hatches in the face of Russian cyberoperations. In direct response to the Russian cyberthreat in recent years, Ukrainian institutions have developed special cybersecurity units: the Ukrainian Security Service (SBU) has an in-house team; the Interior Ministry and National Police created the Cyberpolice force led by Demedyuk; there is a Center for Cyberprotection within the State Service for Special Communications and Information Protection; and the Defense Ministry has been slower to react but is currently discussing the creation of cyberunits for military purposes and cyberdefense, according to Shymkiv. A ministry spokesperson told RFE/RL they could not offer more specific information. Coordinating all of Ukraine's cybersecurity initiatives is the National Security and Defense Council (RNBO), which opened a new cyber-focused center for doing so last month. Some state companies have also taken the initiative. For instance, Ukrainian power distributor Ukrenergo, one of the main targets of cyberattacks in the past two years, said last month that it was investing up to $20 million in a new cyberdefense system. But many Ukrainian institutions and companies -- including those who help lead cybersecurity efforts or guard highly sensitive information -- fail to communicate or coordinate with one another, and remain vulnerable to cyberattacks and information leaks, according to self-described "pro-Ukrainian" hackers who spoke to RFE/RL. One of them, "Sean Townsend," the pseudonymous spokesman and one of the founding members of the hacktivist group Ukrainian Cyber Alliance, said that a recent flash mob organized by him and a dozen or so Ukrainian hacktivist colleagues that they promoted on social media proved cyberdefenses here remain weak. Townsend and the Cyber Alliance usually focus on Russian targets. But worried about Ukraine's cybersecurity, they turned their sights toward their own country in an effort to help find where it might be vulnerable and plug whatever holes exist. Townsend was startled by what they found. "There were many cases where highly classified information was stored simply unprotected," he said. For instance, when Townsend probed Energoatom, the state nuclear-power-plant operator, he "found vulnerabilities that would easily allow hackers to enter the [energy] system" of one of its facilities. Energoatom responded days after the Cyber Alliance published some of its findings online, which caused public concern about a "new Chornobyl." The company essentially dubbed Townsend's findings fake news and said it would be "impossible" to hack the critical energy infrastructure at its power plants. Townsend said he was certain that what he found "could be perfectly used to penetrate power-station equipment." As if that wasn't enough of a concern, he added, among the power plant's unsecured computer networks he was able to obtain countless gigabytes-worth of sensitive documents, including the building plans for the reactor and information pertaining to Westinghouse Electric Company, the U.S.-based provider of nuclear fuel to Ukraine. The story was similar with Ukraine's Defense Ministry. "We found several computers with classified files about Ukrainian forces" that could provide their Russian counterparts with valuable intelligence, Townsend said. Unlike Energoatom, the ministry reacted quickly. "When we notified our military that they have computers leaking data to the Internet, they found them and shut them down," Townsend added. In all, Townsend said more than 200 cases of vulnerabilities were found among Ukraine's state institutions and companies. But not all of them have been addressed. In fact, responses from companies and institutions where vulnerabilities were discovered were mixed; some thanked the Cyber Alliance and addressed the issues, while others shrugged or denied their existence. The Kherson regional administration, annoyed by the alliance's discovery of vulnerabilities that would easily allow ill-intentioned hackers to penetrate its system, even filed a criminal complaint against the Cyber Alliance with the Cyberpolice. Townsend, who said he cooperates closely with Demedyuk and the Cyberpolice, also claimed to have found vulnerabilities in the systems of the presidential administration and the RNBO, both of which he said reacted swiftly and fixed the issues. Townsend placed much of the blame for the inconsistent responses to cyberthreats on poor communication between the various cybersecurity units in government institutions plus a "policies for the sake of policies" approach by the government. "Many of our leaders think we need to simply write down new rules, enforce them, and control how people are executing them, and then all will be well," he said.   Western Help Shymkiv said the U.S. and Western European governments have helped Ukraine strengthen its cybersecurity through training and financial support, but he would like to see much more cooperation. His "dream," he said, was to build a U.S.-led, nongovernmental cybersecurity center in Kyiv that would act as a computer emergency-response team for the public while also focusing on training. Shymkiv said he had discussed the idea with Washington officials who found the idea "interesting" but have indicated there are still some hang-ups preventing them from acting on the idea. "Everybody's concerned [with] how many Russian spies we have in the government," Shymkiv said. "That's why I'm saying, 'Let's build this from scratch...on the principles and approaches defined by the U.S.' Plus, he added, with Ukraine a regular target of Russian hackers, there is a lot the United States could learn from its experience and apply at home." The U.S. Embassy declined to discuss Shymkiv's idea on the record, and intelligence officials in Washington could not be reached for comment. There is some movement within the U.S. Congress to further help Ukraine in the cybersecurity sphere. On February 7, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed the Ukraine Cybersecurity Cooperation Act. The Senate introduced a mirror version of the bill on February 27. The bills call for the State Department to increase cooperation with Kyiv over shared Russian cybersecurity threats by doing several things, including: providing Ukraine necessary support to increase protection on government computers, particularly systems that defend critical infrastructure; reducing Kyiv's reliance on Russian technology; and helping Ukraine to build capacity, expand cybersecurity information sharing, and cooperate on international response efforts. That is all music to the ears of Shymkiv, Demedyuk, and Townsend, who say replacing outdated equipment will go a long way toward protecting Ukraine from cyberattacks.   Stealthier, Evolving Methods But until those bills become law or similar help from elsewhere is provided, Ukraine must muddle through and remain vigilant, which Shymkiv said meant continually educating staff. In recent months, Shymkiv said, he had noticed stealthier and more sophisticated phishing attempts aimed at the presidential administration by hackers he believes are working in Russia. These efforts to extract sensitive information are disguised as messages from internal systems administrators and appear carefully crafted to appeal to specific employees, himself included. "They are extremely well done," Shymkiv said. "[The hackers] are hacking our brains. They target people's trust." But if the Russians were trying to hack the video link through which President Poroshenko was delivering his testimony while Shymkiv spoke, they failed. As Poroshenko finished, Shymkiv breathed a sigh of relief. But he said he never lets his guard down. "Every day [Russian hackers] are trying to collect information of our people," he said. "They are trying to get inside our systems...and to disrupt us."     Sourse: https://www.rferl.org/a/ukraine-struggles-cyberdefense-russia-expands-testing-ground/29085277.html

"Ukrainian market of electric vehicles continues to grow due to used cars"

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"Austrian president to visit Ukraine next week"

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7 March, 2018

"European Investment Bank allocates EUR 16.4 mln for education and infrastructure in Ukraine"

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6 March, 2018
JOHN WHITE CMO and founder of Social Marketing Solutions UGTI on Facebook 9 Industries That Will Soon Be Disrupted By Blockchain Let's face it. Many people are resistant to technological changes in both their personal lives and at the office. However, what they often lack is the vision to see how the new technology they are resisting will improve their lives in the future. Emerging technologies are exciting and bring innovation and new opportunities across the globe. They change our life by altering the way we think and operate on a daily basis. Technological innovation can impact a lot more than our daily lives. In fact, it can disrupt entire industries and change the way we do business. As new technologies are developed, affected industries are forced to adapt or be replaced. The newest technology that is quickly becoming the next major disruption is blockchain technology. Blockchain is a digital ledger system used to securely record transactions. It is poised to impact the way business is done across the globe. Here are nine prominent industries that are slated to be overhauled by blockchain technology in the near future.   1. The Banking Industry Blockchain technology has the potential to solve several significant problems faced by the banking industry today. Right now banks store money for their customers, and they also handle the transfer of that money. Blockchain inherently has a secure system that would provide permanent records of the millions of transactions that take place in the banking industry each day. This ledger system could significantly lower the risk by providing secure records. Furthermore, money could be transferred cheaper and faster by the decentralization provided by blockchain.   2. The Real Estate Industry Anyone who has ever purchased or sold a home knows just how much paperwork is involved in a real estate transaction. Blockchain technology can completely change the current headache that all of these documents cause. By using blockchain, all of the documents and transaction records can be stored securely with measurably less work and less cost. According to Piper Moretti, CEO of the Crypto Realty Group and licensed realtor, the use of blockchain can also potentially eliminate the escrow process. The technology can create smart contracts that release funding only when the conditions are met. Additionally, many people in the process of working with a real estate agent know how frustrating the commission rates can be, with many charging up to 6 percent. Deedcoin is looking to change that with its cryptocurrency-powered platform. Through using Deedcoin's platform and proprietary tokens, those rates decrease to just 1%. Deedcoin's distributed architecture gives power back to homeowners and buyers by tokenizing the process and eliminating any middlemen, barring direct interactions between agents and customers.   3. The Healthcare Industry The healthcare industry has been in need of a significant disruption when it comes to sharing and storing medical data and records. The potential for error, fraud, and lost records has created distrust between consumers and healthcare providers. Blockchain technology can revamp the trust by securely storing medical records that can be accurately and safely transferred to and accessed by the doctors and people who are authorized. Blockchain will aid in the authorization and identification of people. In fact, one startup called Ontology is already working to make positive, multi-source identification a reality across all industries using the blockchain technology.   4. The Legal Industry Blockchain technology is poised to disrupt some areas of the legal industry by being able to store and verify documents and data. For example, litigation dealing with resolving concerns over wills of the deceased or any other documentation can be eliminated. Records (including wills) stored on the blockchain will be quickly and securely verified. Any changes to the documents will be authenticated and stored. Blockchain technology can also eliminate legal issues dealing with inheritance, even including cryptocurrency assets. Safe Haven, for example, gives users the opportunity to secure digital assets so that the investor's legacy can be passed down to his children or designee safely and securely. This technology eliminates lengthy court battles arguing over digital inheritance.   5. The Cryptocurrency Exchange Industry Digital money is the way of the future, and it is thanks to blockchain that it can be securely transferred and recorded. However, the "mining" required to verify and authenticate every transaction of digital money requires an enormous amount of computing power. In recent years, this has created a lot of issues on several platforms when certain transactions "ran out of gas" or fizzled out due to the sheer amount of computation required. This issue was costing users valuable time and money. New developments in blockchain technology are changing the way the cryptocurrency exchange industry operates. Zen Protocol has developed an alternative to other platforms, which has solved the most significant issues in the cryptocurrency space. Unlike other platforms, Zen Protocol utilizes smart contracts that know in advance how much computation each contract requires. That means that unless there is enough "gas" to support that contract, it won't run.   6. Politics In the recent past, government parties here in the U.S. and around the world have been accused of rigging election results. But that won't be possible if blockchain is used because it would take care of voter registration and verification of identity, and it would count the votes to ensure only legitimate votes were counted. Gone are the days of recounting votes and voting day drama.   7. The Startup Industry With thousands of startups looking for investors, there is no current way for them to get in front of the right investors without jeopardizing the security of their ideas. Likewise, there is no right way for investors to find the companies they are interested in backing. Blockchain technology can change all of that. In fact, it has already started. Companies such as Pitch Ventures are creating a way for startups to pitch investors live in a secure manner. Entrepreneurs create summaries of their product or service and investors can quickly sort and find potential opportunities. Ethereum's Smart Contract address allows a secure medium for the pitches, so privacy is maintained.   8. The Video Industry Video is predicted to form 82% of all Internet traffic by 2021, and blockchain may play a significant role by decentralizing the video infrastructure. Decentralizing video encoding, storage, and content distribution will dramatically reduce the cost of video traffic by tapping into $30 billion in wasted Internet computing services. Startups like VideoCoin are already making good on the promise of freeing up this capital, which will allow entirely new and innovative ecosystems of video apps to emerge on the market.   9. The Education Industry The education industry is poised to see some significant breakthroughs utilizing an emerging version of the Internet that combines blockchain, cryptocurrency, and virtual reality. This new Internet will be known as "3DInternet," and it has the power to create a global classroom like never before. SocratesCoin is making big moves to make this a reality. The company will create a global community of faculty, students, campuses, and curriculum. The students will encompass all ages, cultures, and locations. SocratesCoin has secured Nauka University, which will utilize 3DInternet to unite science, thought leadership and science through education.   Blockchain-distributed ledger technology provides a safe and auditable way to record and transfer data. It can transform the way we live our everyday lives and disrupt any industry that uses data or transactions at all. And all of this disruption is a good thing. Whether or not you like to introduce new tech into your life, I think we can all agree that added security to our financial data would give everyone more peace of mind.     Sourse: https://www.inc.com/john-white/9-industries-that-will-soon-be-disrupted-by-blockchain.html

"Total investment in Ukrainian IT companies triple in 2017"

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"Ukraine, United Kingdom sign memorandum of cooperation in tackling cybercrime"

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5 March, 2018

"European Commission plans to allocate EUR 33 mln to Ukraine for budget support programs"

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"Finland will issue EUR15 mln for education and energy efficiency projects in Ukraine in 2018-2021"

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3 March, 2018

"Defense minister of the Kingdom of Sweden to arrive in Kyiv on March 5"

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"Ukrainian farmers’ demand for mineral fertilizers met by 79% now"

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2 March, 2018

"State Statistics: Ukraine’s exports of goods to EU grew by 30%, imports – by 21% in 2017"

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"President signs law on privatization"

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1 March, 2018
LARRY MYLER CEO By Monday, Inc., adjunct professor in the Rollins Center for Entrepreneurship & Technology at BYU UGTI on Facebook Farm-To-Table: How Blockchain Tech Will Change The Way You Eat Forget about Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies for a minute. The underlying technology is what I’m interested in. Blockchain is working its way into all aspects of B2B commerce, including our food chain. Here’s the why and how of this latest expression of a technology that is bringing massive change, and benefit, to yet another industry. According to the World Health Organization, 10% of us fall ill with a food-borne disease each year. Most of these diseases aren’t hard to prevent, but without clear and consistent oversight they remain prevalent. With the meteoric rise of the blockchain phenomenon, food commerce will soon get the shakeup it needs.   Transparency in the Age of Smartphones When a consumer enters a grocery store, she often has no idea how her food was handled or sourced. She could pick up a head of lettuce contaminated with E. coli, as dozens of Americans did in late 2017. Maybe she grabs a dozen eggs loaded with the anti-flea insecticide fipronil, like a dozen out of 700,000 eggs that ended up in Great Britain. Or, instead, maybe she reaches for her smartphone, scans a QR code on the food in question, and reads a report on where her groceries came from. TE-FOOD is an example of a new type of company offering a tracking system intended to provide all food industry participants—from farmers and wholesalers to retailers and consumers—with robust information about the products they buy and sell. This kind of technology rides the wave of the farm-to-table movement, while helping to iron out some of the chief concerns held by grocery shoppers and restaurant customers. Andrea Reusing, the chef at Lantern and a contributor for NPR, says, “The ubiquity that makes farm-to-table meaningless also gives it its power.” Though "farm-to-table" has gained buzzword status, there are no regulations on what farm-to-table food actually entails. According to Reusing, the phrase implies “adherence to fair labor standards, supply chain transparency or avoidance of GMOs,” but has become “increasingly unhitched from the issues it is so often assumed to address.” This is where the blockchain revolution re-imagines the meaning of farm-to-table. It documents all of the B2B relationships that lead up to the final B2C transaction. Consumers can see exactly when their food was grown, what sorts of pesticides and antibiotics were used and how it compares to other products on the shelves. An educated consumer only needs her smartphone to determine which grocery item is the cleanest, healthiest and most ethical.   Eradicating Food-Borne Disease Before food even reaches restaurant plates or grocery shelves, blockchain technology could prevent the spread of contamination of diseases like E. coli. A system like TE-FOOD acts as a third party, enabling buyers to more nimbly monitor the quality of food and the schedule on which it is transported. When a food producer notices a potentially dangerous anomaly, it would take only a few clicks on a screen to identify other contaminated products, as opposed to a time-consuming, costly and potentially imprecise by-hand investigation. If a contaminated product finds its way to a grocery store chain, the storeowners could use blockchain tech to perform an agile recall. A more targeted system to recall food cuts down on time, money and food waste, creating a win for business owners and environmentalists alike. Why has it taken so long to make the food industry more transparent? According to Reusing, it’s all about the money. “Food production and processing… is nearly always configured to rely on cheap labor.” The end consumers and retailers are the ones who benefit most from transparency, but the burden of paying for traceability often falls to those B2B suppliers at the beginning of the supply chain, like farmers. This is why a consistent system—one that everyone in the supply chain uses—is integral. A blockchain system allows all players to get on the same page and track food in a more cost-effective way. Historically, if farmers wanted to track their cattle, they would use an RFID tag (a radio frequency tag that transmits data). Each tag costs between $2 and $5 and only covers the cost of the farmer’s portion of the supply chain. To date there is no comprehensive farm-to-table tracking option. Compare that to a TE-FOOD-type system of QR code security seals and stickers, which cost less than $1 per animal. That’s an 80% decrease, and it covers the entire supply chain, from slaughterhouses to food producers to wholesales and the end retailer. This is a compelling reason to embrace blockchain. Given the current success in using blockchain to track the food industry in the Ho Chi Minh City region, other members of the international community can expect their countries to follow suit before long. Should governments step in and engage with these solutions, improved farm-to-table traceability will arrive even more quickly. As consumers become more interested in the stories behind their food, government involvement and legislation seem increasingly likely. Blockchain tech has amassed a long list of industries it is poised to revolutionize. Food and health, two of our most fundamental quality-of-life sectors, may be the next to change. We could be looking at a future with higher standards for health and a stronger understanding of our food, with the added bonus of a discounted price tag. While we may never eradicate food-borne disease, blockchain technology will certainly bring a new level of affordable transparency and accountability.     Sourse: https://www.forbes.com/sites/larrymyler/2018/02/16/farm-to-table-how-blockchain-tech-will-change-the-way-you-eat/#469f12d42c45

"Altostrata from Ireland plans to invest EUR 225 mln in construction of solar power plant in Ukraine (Dnipropetrovsk region)"

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"European Commission ready to approve EUR 1 bln financial package to Ukraine"

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28 February, 2018

"Energy Efficiency Fund can raise EUR 100 mln from partners in March"

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"Ukraine, Denmark sign agreement on further cooperation within energy center"

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27 February, 2018
BOHDAN DANYLYSHYN Ukrainian politician, economist and statesman UGTI on Facebook What should medium-term strategy of Ukraine's economic development look like? Earlier I attended a meeting of the Ukrainian government, where I considered the "Report on the progress and results of the Program of the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine in 2017". The government has launched a number of reforms that, if properly coordinated and directed, can significantly change both the institutional form of the relationship between the state and business entities and form a new structural framework for economic development. On the whole, I positively assess efforts of the government to ensure the reform of economic relations in the country. The Cabinet of Ministers within the framework of the policy of economic growth has worked out a number of initiatives, the introduction of which will significantly accelerate the development of key sectors of the economy, primarily the industrial and agricultural sectors, as well as attract investment and innovation in the economy and citizens' lives. However, in our opinion, the government should not forget that Ukraine has formed an economic model, which has three features: export orientation, a significant level of import dependence and relative underdevelopment of the domestic market. But the ratio of exports of goods and services (as well as their imports) to GDP fluctuates around 50%. At the same time, the indicator of net exports remains negative. So, if in 2016 it amounted to -5.5 billion dollars, then in 2017 – it was already - 6.8 billion dollars. An important factor is the negative balance of foreign trade in goods, which increased in 2016-2017, from - 6.9 billion dollars to - 9.2 billion dollars. So, as an obvious way to accelerate economic growth, short-term (2020-2025) incentive measures should be considered: - restructuring of export activities; - reduction of import dependence; - development of the internal market.   Restructuring of export activities - a short-term aspect Given the existing market advantages in the production of agricultural goods, the main focus should primarily be on increasing the production of high-tech goods, the cost of which in foreign markets can be five to six times higher than the cost of raw materials. This, for example, concerns the transition from the export of conventional grain to the export of lactose syrups produced from it, amino acids, gluten, bioplastics, vitamins. Similar opportunities exist for the export of high-tech whey produced from conventional milk. Secondly, it is necessary to deepen our relations with the EU within the FTA, that is, to achieve a softening of the conditions for access of Ukrainian products from the internal market of Europe by increasing the current quotas and reducing the current tariff restrictions. Thirdly, it is necessary to ensure the full implementation by Ukreximbank of its "core" functions regarding the support of domestic exporters with the simultaneous practical launch of the Export Credit Agency.   Reduction of import dependence - a short-term aspect In 2017, commodity imports to Ukraine increased by $ 8.5 billion, of which almost half (3.9 billion) accounted for the increase in imports of mineral products (primarily oil and petroleum products, coal, anthracite, briquettes, etc.). This became an additional factor in increasing the energy dependence of the national economy. In the course of 9 months of 2017, the cost of imports of hard coal from the Russian Federation increased by 67.6% in the corresponding period of 2016, and by 20.9% in physical volumes. This requires an early geographic re-profiling of imported energy supplies while reducing the energy intensity of the national economy.   The development of the domestic market - a short-term aspect Accelerated economic growth is impossible without first addressing the problems we have at customs, because of which "gray" and "black" imports suppress the production of analogs of goods. Secondly, it is advisable to create a kind of development fund that would be formed from several sources of financing (budget, private, foreign, donor, etc.), aimed at developing modern production technologies and would be supervised by the supervisory board from respected Ukrainian and foreign participants. Thirdly, the introduction of such a fund requires a clear definition of promising technologies, as well as mechanisms and instruments for their support: tax, fiscal, credit, foreign exchange, and others. Unfortunately, today such a list of technological priorities and the system of their targeted support in the country de facto does not exist. However, in reality, there are other phenomena when the state accumulates funds during the year on its own treasury account in the National Bank, and then "releases" up to UAH 50 billion to the market within two to three weeks before the New Year holidays, as, for example, we saw in 2017. As a result: hryvnia depreciates, inflation grows, the National Bank raises the discount rate, bank loans increase and it becomes incomprehensible how they can support economic growth if their value starts to reach 18-20% per annum (in national currency).   Investments Modernization of the national economy is impossible without the receipt of foreign direct investment, which is directly related to the import of new technologies. Both the state and national business should increase capital investment. The business should be a positive example in this respect, demonstrating effective cooperation in the form of a successful public-private partnership in implementing joint development projects.   Preservation of labor potential of the country Without the implementation of these measures aimed at technological modernization of production, it will be impossible either to achieve accelerated growth of the national economy or to preserve its labor potential. After all, if during 2015-2017, 800 thousand of labor migrants left the country left and did not return, then in 2018-2019 another 500 thousand people can join them. Not only the domestic experts but also the leading Western centers (in particular, the Atlantic Council) note the negative consequences of the loss of the most active, professionally trained and valuable workers. It should be noted that we are unlikely to be able to keep promising young people in the country on the existing raw materials base of domestic production. Moreover, the nearest neighbors are able to offer them more interesting working conditions.   Medium-term strategy of economic development based on technological modernization In general, all these issues are interrelated. Therefore, they should be combined into a single strategy of economic development on new technological principles. The latter should be designed for a medium-term period, for example, 2019-2025. It is advisable to entrust it to the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine with the involvement of the National Bank of Ukraine, the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, as well as representatives of the expert environment. Such a strategy of technological modernization should link the production of the real sector to the single complex, with the activities of specialized scientific institutions and applied production and research centers, which for today does not exist. The development of such a strategy should be initiated as early as 2018 so that by 2019 it would be possible not only to have agreed content but also to begin its practical implementation. The key task of such an economic growth strategy should be to ensure the development of the national economy at a pace higher than the world average. The announced 5-7% annual increase in the real GDP of Ukraine is desirable.     Sourse: https://112.international/opinion/what-should-medium-term-strategy-of-ukraines-economic-development-look-like-25840.html

"Venture investment in Ukrainian start-ups triples in 2017, to $300 mln – Economy ministry"

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"Ukraine, Indonesia to develop scientific cooperation"

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26 February, 2018

"Ukroboronprom ready to join Hyperloop project"

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"Ukraine slightly reduces steel output in Jan 2018, ranks tenth in Worldsteel rating"

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24 February, 2018

"Ambassador Chaly: United States views Ukraine as serious strategic partner"

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"UK to promote conducting transparent privatization in Ukraine – embassy"

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23 February, 2018

"Ukrzaliznytsia, GE sign 15-year contract worth $1 bln on delivery of locomotives, their localization and maintenance"

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"Ukraine pins hopes on China International Import Expo to boost exports"

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22 February, 2018
KOSTIANTYN TSENTSURA Student, journalist UGTI on Facebook 18 tech companies in Ukraine among world’s top outsourcers Eighteen information technology companies operating in Ukraine have made it onto the list of the best tech firms in the world – the 2018 Global Outsourcing 100. Twelve Ukrainian-founded software developers, along with six international IT companies that have Ukrainian offices, are on the list of 100 most successful tech companies worldwide. Compiled by the International Association of Outsourcing Professionals (IAOP), the alphabetical order list has now been posted on the IAOP’s website. The main criteria for ranking the companies were profitability, team growth, customer recommendations, and level of corporate social responsibility. The top 100 outsources list is designed to help IT companies find business partners by highlighting the best of them. The Ukrainian firms are located in the country’s biggest cities – Kyiv, Lviv, Kharkiv, and Dnipro. They are: Ciklum, Infopulse, Miratech, Innovecs, Softengi, SoftServe, ELEKS, Intellias, N-iX, Sigma Software, Program-Ace, and AMC Bridge. Three tech firms with Ukrainian offices have their headquarters in the United States (EPAM, TEAM International Services, Softjourn) and other three are originally from Switzerland, Norway, and Russia (Luxoft, Itera, and Artezio). ...     Sourse: https://www.kyivpost.com/technology/18-tech-companies-ukraine-among-worlds-top-outsourcers.html

"Infrastructure Minister of Ukraine to announce start of Hyperloop project"

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"U.S. Orbis asset management will issue $30 MLN for lending to farmers"

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21 February, 2018

"Asset management company Horizon Capital wants to invest up to $200 MLN in Ukraine"

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"United States and European Union are largest international donors to Ukraine"

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20 February, 2018
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook International Cybersecurity Leaders Forum: The U.S.-Ukraine Cybersecurity Partnership Our Track “1.5” Initiative launch with GW’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security launch on February 7 was a great success. For those unable to attend in person but interested in the topic and discussion you can watch the video below.     https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=-D7uWltP-98&app=desktop

"World Bank sees growth of Ukrainian economy"

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"Most large Ukrainian companies seek to increase expenses on cyber security in 2018"

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19 February, 2018

"Over a dozen world-famous companies have desire to participate in Ukraine’s GTS management"

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"Europe-Ukraine Forum to be held in Poland in March"

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17 February, 2018

"President of European Commission assures that the EU is ready to strengthen support for Ukraine in 2018"

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"PrivatBank posts UAH 1.1 bln profit"

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16 February, 2018

"Finance minister, IMF experts discuss reform of State Fiscal Service"

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"Ukraine sees 19% real growth of wages in 2017"

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15 February, 2018
CHRIS BING Cybersecurity reporter for Scoop News Group UGTI on Facebook U.S. moves to develop grand cybersecurity partnership with Ukraine, a favorite target for Russian hackers During a week where multiple senior Ukrainian government officials came to visit Washington, a bill designed to foster further collaboration on cybersecurity efforts between the U.S. and Ukrainian governments passed the House of Representatives late Wednesday night. Known as the “Ukraine Cybersecurity Cooperation Act of 2017,” the bipartisan legislation was first introduced by Rep. Brendan Boyle, D-Pa., in April 2017 just three months after news surfaced that a massive electric power blackout in Kiev had been caused by a complex cyberattack. Cybersecurity experts later attributed the attack to Russian hackers. The bill, which was cosponsored by Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick, R-Pa., passed with a 404-4 vote. In practice, the bill would encourage greater cooperation between the U.S. and Ukraine regarding several key digital defense priorities, including a promise that the U.S. will support the Ukrainian government when or if requested. The legislation proposes organizing the partnership through a Department of State initiative, including regular reporting back to Congress about the agreement’s ongoing effectiveness. While the U.S. and Ukraine already work together on various diplomatic missions, the Ukraine Cybersecurity Cooperation Act deliberately requires for the U.S. to help provide Kiev with “advanced security protection on government computers, particularly systems that defend Ukraine’s critical infrastructure; provide Ukraine support to reduce reliance on Russian technology; and help Ukraine to build capacity, expand cyber security information sharing, and cooperate in international response efforts,” according to the bill. Boyle, a member of the House Foreign affairs committee and outspoken advocate for more robust relations with Ukraine, said the bill represented a “strong step forward in the ongoing fight to counter Russia’s intensifying cyber-aggression.” “Over the last few years, Russia has been using Ukraine as a field test for cyber attacks that endanger the national security of our great ally Ukraine, its regional neighbors, and the United States,” Boyle said. “H.R. 1997 sends a strong signal to Russia and all those who threaten the cybersecurity of America and its allies that we are ready and able to protect ourselves against this escalating threat … Time is of the essence, with American and Ukrainian elections each right around the corner.” The legislation now heads to the Senate for a vote. At the moment, there is no companion bill in the upper chamber. Boyle’ bill is important for a number of reasons, including the fact that Ukraine is not yet a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). With membership comes a legal framework for how and when the U.S. could respond to attacks against Ukraine under Article 5 of the treaty. The Act provides another avenue for the U.S. government to voice their commitment without having NATO accept Ukraine’s application; a move which some in the Putin regime say could trigger a military conflict.     Sourse: https://www.cyberscoop.com/us-ukraine-cybersecurity-act/

"Ukraine’s economy sees growth eight quarters in a row – State Statistics"

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"U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Sullivan to visit Ukraine"

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14 February, 2018

"Ukraine to present national stand at EXPO-2020 in Dubai"

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"Draft U.S. budget provides $200 mln in security assistance for Ukraine"

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13 February, 2018
LARRY MYLER CEO By Monday, Inc., adjunct professor in the Rollins Center for Entrepreneurship & Technology at BYU UGTI on Facebook How Blockchain Technology can help B2B companies become more profitable The Bitcoin frenzy has made it very difficult to understand blockchain technology and advanced ledger technologies. Until they are more easily understood, B2B interests cannot take advantage of the potential profits. But that won’t be the case for very long. Blockchain is a sophisticated algorithm created for cryptocurrency. It drives a distributed data structure that manages electronic cash movements. It replaces the administrative role of a central bank or government backing. The blockchain is the repository and distributor of virtual coins. Crypto-coins are not carried or handled, but they do trade, multiply and function thanks to the blockchain at the center. If you picture a business ledger that updates itself in real-time, multiplying that picture by billions of data spaces will give you some illustration of the way blockchain works. For B2B companies, it can be a virtual bank—moving money, accepting deposits, completing transactions and more. This differs from online banking where your business is subject to regulation, monitoring, business hours and other restrictions.   How Does Blockchain Technology Help B2B companies? • Efficient supply chains. The blockchain is open to all members of the network. An IBM report notes, “This ‘shared version of events’ enables improved supply chain efficiencies, better multi-party collaboration, and streamlined resolution processes when exceptions or disputes occur.” It does not replace legacy chain supply software, but it engages new realities like the expanding data flows presented by the Internet of Things. • Improved sales processes. “The B2B sales process is based on relationships and responsibility,” said Jeremy Epstein, blockchain marketing expert and CEO of blockchain consulting firm, Never Stop Marketing. B2B sales relationships are ongoing, have a longer lifespan, and in general, require a longer sales cycle than B2C sales. “Trust is essential to B2B sales success and blockchain technology represents a way to expedite the creation of trusted relationships at lower costs” he continued. His eBook, The CMO Primer for the Blockchain World, points out that only 50% of businesses check buyer credit worthiness, request secure forms of payment, or both. And 81.5% of companies report employing credit management policies to mitigate trade risks. • Ease and speed. Joe McKendrickpoints out that, with this open access system, “blockchain's value proposition is that it takes out the middlemen in transactions, enabling more autonomous types of engagements.” Easing and escalating the speed of financial transactions, blockchain replaces banks, credit card processing and checking. This reduces cost to B2B vendors and customers. • Beyond fintech. B2B Business Network believes, “Outside of fintech applications, blockchain has yet to make its impact felt.” However, contributor Derek Handova predicted B2B applications will catch on soon. In 2016, the writer saw it serving only the finance/tech world. But, he envisioned future value in real estate transactions, identity management, healthcare records and more. He called it a “Swiss Army Knife of technology.” • Safe and secure. Phoebe Luckhurstinsists, “The future is in the chain.” But she also admits that the blockchain is only as good as its code, and codes have been cracked. Goldman Sachs agrees on its credibility, calling it “a faster, safer way to verify key information and establish trust.” And Professor Kevin Werbach at Wharton refers to “a new architecture of trust,” a system where you do not deal with an intermediary person, institution or authority. • Real savings. B2B merchants in retail or online need the cost savings promised by blockchain dealing. First and fundamentally, it speeds the transaction, immediately moving the customer payment to the vendor. Second, this speed ripples back through the supply chain and forward to the customer’s satisfaction. Third, it facilitates distribution and logistics, increasing efficiencies down the line. And, fourth, by bypassing credit card processors and other merchant services, blockchain reduces the overhead reflecting the price of service.   Blockchain is Picking Up Velocity This technology may have the public confused. Most people had never heard of it until Bitcoin started to catch everyone’s attention. Virtual coinage and cryptocurrency are a long way from being ubiquitous terms, but that is changing fast. Epstein notes, “We are living in the ‘age of accelerations,’ as Tom Friedman calls it. In fact, there are studies out now that say millennials would prefer to hold cryptocurrencies over stocks. Granted, some of that is due to the crypto-mania currently taking place, but it is noteworthy.” A closer look at blockchain and distributed ledger technology reveals the deep impression it has made on major banks, Big Data, social media platforms, browser powerhouses and eCommerce leaders. IBM is already using blockchain in its television commercials for business cloud services. The next generation of providers and consumers will know the tools and language well. The transactions will be second nature to them, and anything not blockchain will seem archaic, risky and foolishly expensive. The reality is, most people will not even know they are using a blockchain back-end, but just like WiFi, fast internet, and phones today, in the near future the expectation will be intermediary-free transactions. The cryptocurrency platforms have invited people to come to them. Other than the sophisticated code, they have no product to offer. Conversely, a credit card provides the illusion of cash that is on hand and available. Thanks to some governmental oversight, we have credit card statements that we almost understand. The public has adapted to this, psychologically. Likewise, the business owner has become used to established routines and GAAP oversight. This significant shift in ledger processing will come with a learning curve, and although the new systems would immediately benefit eCommerce, it will require a revolution in how online marketing and sales occur. We can anticipate a time when blockchain will ensure even greater security, more practical applications and customized products. When customers find it cost effective and easy to navigate, the market will follow. “There’s a saying in the blockchain world,” says Epstein who works with blue-chip crypto projects like OpenBazaar and Zcash. “Five months in crypto is like five years in the regular world in terms of change. My advice is that it’s better to spend the time now to get prepared than to get caught blind-sided.” How long this transition will take is anyone’s guess, but it’s gaining momentum. Increased trust, security and efficiency will always help B2B companies compete. Blockchain can build all three.     Sourse: https://www.forbes.com/sites/larrymyler/2018/01/22/how-blockchain-technology-can-help-b2b-companies-become-more-profitable/

"'Marshall Plan' for Ukraine can be discussed at G7 summit in Canada – Kubilius"

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"Ukrainian banks interested in securities investments of foreign issuers"

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12 February, 2018

"Ukraine agriculture boosted by new financial tool"

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"IMF experts start working in Ukraine"

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10 February, 2018

"Ukrainian Education Ministry, World Bank agree on expert assistance"

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"Fiscal Service: import of new cars to Ukraine 28% up in 2017"

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9 February, 2018

"Belgium's Upgrade Energy wants to build 25-30 MW solar power plant in Zhytomyr region"

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"Ukrainian cyber police want to legalize cryptocurrency"

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8 February, 2018
YULIANA ROMANYSHYN Staff writer at the Kyiv Post UGTI on Facebook Ukraine House Davos succeeds, gives hope for new investment The first-ever conference venue Ukraine House Davos turned out to be a success, welcoming more than 5,000 investors, top executives, activists, politicians and other visitors during its five-day run on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum in Switzerland. The event, which ran from Jan. 22–26, featured panel discussions, receptions and speeches promoting the country’s investment opportunities and some of its most talented people. The events focused on technology and innovations, like blockchain, as well as data science, energy, agricultural business and cryptocurrency. Sophia, a social humanoid robot manufactured by Hanson Robotics, also went on display. “Ukraine has to push itself in,” Jaroslawa Johnson, president and CEO of the Western NIS Enterprise Fund, said. “And make sure that everyone recognizes it as an important player, not simply someone in a sidelight of Russia.” Johnson made three previous trips to the forum, an annual conference that gathers the global economic and business elite. She noticed that Ukraine didn’t have a strong presence and, after last year’s test event — Ukrainian Davos Nights in 2017 — the organizers came up with this year’s plan for Ukraine House Davos. Without receiving government support, the Ukrainian Venture Capital and Private Equity Association teamed up with the Western NIS Enterprise Fund and the Victor Pinchuk Foundation, among others. ...     Sourse: https://www.kyivpost.com/business/ukraine-house-davos-succeeds-gives-hope-new-investment.html

"U.S. House of Representatives supports Act aimed to enhance U.S.-Ukraine cyber security cooperation"

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"IMF mission to arrive in Ukraine on Feb 12"

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7 February, 2018

"First auctions to sell small privatization facilities could be held in June 2018"

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"Antonov Airlines took part in preparations for Falcon Heavy rocket launch"

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6 February, 2018
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook   Please register at the link below and join me and my colleagues at GW tomorrow (Wednesday, February 7) at 10am.   https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07ef2qbo6jed10c086&oseq=&c=&ch= International Cybersecurity Leaders Forum: The U.S.-Ukraine Cybersecurity Partnership Ukraine and the United States face many of the same cyber threats and share certain interests. To discuss these challenges, as well as the opportunities they present for cooperation on joint goals, the Center for Cyber & Homeland Security in cooperation with the Embassy of Ukraine in the United States will convene an International Cybersecurity Leaders Forum on Wednesday, February 7th, 2018. Keynote remarks --- by Dmytro Shymkiv, Deputy Head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine; and by U.S. Congressman Brendan Boyle (confirmed, subject to votes), Member of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, and Sponsor of H.R. 1997 - Ukraine Cybersecurity Cooperation Act of 2017 --- will be followed by a panel of experts.   Opening Remarks: Frank J. Cilluffo - Director Center for Cyber & Homeland Security; Ambassador Valeriy Chaly - Ambassador of Ukraine to the United States; Dr. Leo M. Chalupa - Vice President for Research, The George Washington University.   Keynote Remarks Featuring: Dmytro Shymkiv - Deputy Head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine Former Head of Microsoft Ukraine; Congressman Brendan Boyle (D-PA) (confirmed, subject to votes) - Member, House Committee on Foreign Affairs Sponsor of H.R. 1997 - Ukraine Cybersecurity Cooperation Act of 2017. New Speaker Added: Robert Strayer - Deputy Assistant Secretary for Cyber and International Communications and Information Policy, Department of State   Followed by a Panel Discussion: Oleh Derevianko, Co-Founder and Chairman, Information Systems Security Partners (Kyiv, Ukraine); Co-Founder and President, Kyiv Cyber Academy Former Deputy Minister and Chief of Staff at the Ministry of Education and Science, Ukraine Bob Flores, Former Chief Technology Officer, Central Intelligence Agency Junaid Islam, Chief Technology Officer and President, Vidder, Inc. Scott McCormick, Chief Technology Officer, Alchemy Data Matthew Murray, International Lawyer Specializing in National Security Affairs Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Europe, the Middle East and Africa   Panel Moderator: Aleks Mehrle - President, UGTI Inc.

"Exports of it services in Ukraine 7% up in 2017"

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"Ukraine among world leaders in blockchain innovation – Justice Ministry"

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5 February, 2018

"Ukraine-EU agricultural products turnover grew by 31% in 2017"

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"Google LLC (Kyiv) sees 75% rise in revenue from advertisement in Ukraine"

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3 February, 2018

"Cyber forces to be created in the ranks of Ukraine’s Armed Forces – National Defense Council Secretary"

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"Company from Ukrainian Solar Systems launches 16 MW solar plant in Zaporizhia region"

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2 February, 2018

"Ukraine House Davos succeeds, gives hope for new investment"

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"Ukraine to participate in China International Import Expo - Xinhua"

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1 February, 2018
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook   Join me and my colleagues in Washington, DC at George Washington University at 10am on February 7 by registering at the "Register Here" link below. Please also note an update to the agenda. Robert L. Strayer, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Cyber and International Communications and Information Policy at the US Department of State will join Dmytro Shymkiv, Deputy Head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine and Congressman Brendan Boyle (D-PA) (confirmed subject to votes) Member, House Committee on Foreign Affairs Sponsor of H.R. 1997 - Ukraine Cybersecurity Cooperation Act of 2017 in making a keynote remark.   International Cybersecurity Leaders Forum: The U.S.-Ukraine Cybersecurity Partnership Ukraine and the United States face many of the same cyber threats and share certain interests. To discuss these challenges, as well as the opportunities they present for cooperation on joint goals, the Center for Cyber & Homeland Security in cooperation with the Embassy of Ukraine in the United States will convene an International Cybersecurity Leaders Forum on Wednesday, February 7th, 2018. Keynote remarks --- by Dmytro Shymkiv, Deputy Head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine; and by U.S. Congressman Brendan Boyle (confirmed, subject to votes), Member of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, and Sponsor of H.R. 1997 - Ukraine Cybersecurity Cooperation Act of 2017 --- will be followed by a panel of experts.   Opening Remarks: Frank J. Cilluffo - Director Center for Cyber & Homeland Security; Ambassador Valeriy Chaly - Ambassador of Ukraine to the United States; Dr. Leo M. Chalupa - Vice President for Research, The George Washington University.   Keynote Remarks Featuring: Dmytro Shymkiv - Deputy Head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine Former Head of Microsoft Ukraine; Congressman Brendan Boyle (D-PA) (confirmed, subject to votes) - Member, House Committee on Foreign Affairs Sponsor of H.R. 1997 - Ukraine Cybersecurity Cooperation Act of 2017.   Followed by a Panel Discussion: Oleh Derevianko, Co-Founder and Chairman, Information Systems Security Partners (Kyiv, Ukraine); Co-Founder and President, Kyiv Cyber Academy Former Deputy Minister and Chief of Staff at the Ministry of Education and Science, Ukraine Bob Flores, Former Chief Technology Officer, Central Intelligence Agency Junaid Islam, Chief Technology Officer and President, Vidder, Inc. Scott McCormick, Chief Technology Officer, Alchemy Data Matthew Murray, International Lawyer Specializing in National Security Affairs Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Europe, the Middle East and Africa

"IMF representative predicts Ukraine's economy may grow by 3%-3.5% in 2018"

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"Italians ready to invest in infrastructure projects of Kyiv"

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31 January, 2018

"Results of 2017: Ukrainian airlines see 27.5% rise in passenger transportation, passenger flow at airports 27.6% up"

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"Canadian companies seek to invest in alternative power units in Luhansk region"

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30 January, 2018
DANIEL JEFFRIES Author at the Hacker Noon, futurist and thinker UGTI on Facebook Why Everyone Missed the Most Mind-Blowing Feature of Cryptocurrency There’s one incredible feature of cryptocurrencies that almost everyone seems to have missed, including Satoshi himself. But it’s there, hidden away, steadily gathering power like a hurricane far out to sea that’s sweeping towards the shore. It’s a stealth feature, one that hasn’t activated yet. But when it does it will ripple across the entire world, remaking every aspect of society. To understand why, you just have to understand a little about the history of money.   The Ascent of Money Money is power. Nobody knew this better than the kings of the ancient world. That’s why they gave themselves an absolute monopoly on minting moolah. They turned shiny metal into coins, paid their soldiers and their soldiers bought things at local stores. The king then sent their soldiers to the merchants with a simple message: “Pay your taxes in this coin or we’ll kill you.” That’s almost the entire history of money in one paragraph. Coercion and control of the supply with violence, aka the “violence hack.” The one hack to rule them all. When power passed from monarchs to nation-states, distributing power from one strongman to a small group of strongmen, the power to print money passed to the state. Anyone who tried to create their own money got crushed. The reason is simple: Centralized enemies are easy to destroy with a “decapitation attack.” Cut off the head of the snake and that’s the end of anyone who would dare challenge the power of the state and its divine right to create coins. That’s what happened to e-gold in 2008, one of the first attempts to create an alternative currency. Launched in 1996, by 2004 it had over a million accounts and at its peak in 2008 it was processing over $2 billion dollars worth of transactions. The US government attacked the four leaders of the system, bringing charges against them for money laundering and running an “unlicensed money transmitting” business in the case “UNITED STATES of America v. E-GOLD, LTD, et al.” It destroyed the company by bankrupting the founders. Even with light sentences for the ring leaders, it was game over. Although the government didn’t technically shut down e-gold, practically it was finished. “Unlicensed” is the key word in their attack. The power to grant a license is monopoly power. E-gold was free to apply for interstate money transmitting licenses. It’s just they were never going to get them. And of course that put them out of business. It’s a living, breathing Catch-22. And it works every time. Kings and nation states know the real golden rule: Control the money and you control the world. And so it’s gone for thousands and thousands of years. The very first emperor of China, Qin Shi Huang (260–210 BC), abolished all other forms of local currency and introduced a uniform copper coin. That’s been the blueprint ever since. Eradicate alternative coins, create one coin to rule them all and use brutality and blood to keep that power at all costs. In the end, every system is vulnerable to violence. Well, almost every one.   The Hydra In decentralized systems, there is no head of the snake. Decentralized systems are a hydra. Cut off one head and two more pop-in to take its place. In 2008, an anonymous programmer, working in secret, figured out the solution to the violence hack once and for all when he wrote: “Governments are good at cutting off the heads of centrally controlled networks like Napster, but pure P2P networks like Gnutella and Tor seem to be holding their own.” And the first decentralized system of money was born: Bitcoin. It was explicitly designed to resist coercion and control by centralized powers. Satoshi wisely remained anonymous for that very reason. He knew they would come after him because he was the symbolic head of Bitcoin. That’s what’s happened every time someone has come forward claiming to be Satoshi or when someone has been “outed” by the news media as Bitcoin’s mysterious creator. When fake Satoshi Craig Wright came out, Australian authorities immediately raided his house. The official reason is always spurious. The real reason is to cut off the head of the snake. As Bitcoin rises in value, the hunt for Satoshi will only intensify. He controls at least a million coins that have never moved from his original wallets. If VC Chris Dixon is right and Bitcoin rocket to $100,000 a coin, those million coins will shoot up to $100 billion. If it goes even higher, say a $1 million a coin, that would make him the world’s first trillionaire. And that will only bring the hammer down harder and faster on him. You can be 100% sure that black ops units would be gunning for him around the clock. Wherever he is, my advice to Satoshi is this: Stay anonymous until your death bed. But resistance to censorship and violence are only one of a number of incredible features of Bitcoin. Many of those key components are already at work in a number of other cryptocurrencies and decentralized app projects, most notably blockchains. Blockchains are distributed ledgers, the third entry in the world’s first triple-entry accounting system. And breakthroughs in accounting have always presaged a massive uptick in human complexity and economic growth, as I laid out in my article Why Everyone Missed the Most Important Invention in the Last 500 Years. But even triple-entry accounting, decentralization and resistance to the violence hack are not the true power of cryptocurrencies. Those are merely the mechanisms of the system, the way it survives and thrives, bringing new capabilities to the human race. The ultimate feature is one that Bitcoin and current cryptocurrencies have only hinted at so far, a latent feature. The true power of cryptocurrencies is the power to print and distribute money without a central power. Maybe that seems obvious, but I assure you, it’s not. Especially the second part. That power has always rested with the divine right of kings and nation-states. Until now. Now that right returns to its rightful owners: The people. nd that will blow open the doors of world commerce, sowing the seeds for Star Trek like abundance economics, leaving the Old World Order of pure scarcity economics in the pages of history books. There’s just one problem. Nobody has created the cryptocurrency we actually need just yet. You see, Satoshi understood the first part of the maxim, the power toprint money. What he missed was the power to distribute that money. The second part is actually the most crucial part of the puzzle. Missing it created a critical flaw in the Bitcoin ecosystem. Instead of distributing the money far and wide, it traded central bankers for an un-elected group of miners. These miners play havoc with the system, holding back much needed software upgrades like SegWit for years and threatening pointless hard forksin order to drive down the price with FUD and scoop up more coins at a depressed price. But what if there was a different way? What if you could design a system that would completely alter the economic landscape of the world forever? The key is how you distribute the money at the moment of creation. And the first group to recognize this opportunity and put it into action will change the world. To understand why you have to look at how money is created and pushed out into the system today.   The Great Pyramid Today, money starts at the top and flows down to everyone else. Think of it as a pyramid. In fact, we have a famous pyramid, with a third eye, on the dollar itself. One of the most cliched arguments against Bitcoin is that it’s a Ponzi or “pyramid” scheme. A pyramid scheme rests on the original creators of the system roping in as many suckers as possible, paying them for enrolling people in the system rather than by offering goods and services. Eventually you run out of people to bring in and the whole things collapses like a house of cards. A Ponzi scheme is basically the same, in that you dupe the original investors with fake returns on their initial investment, a la Bernie Madoff, and then get them to rope in more suckers because they’re so elated by the huge returns. The irony of course is that fiat currency, i.e. government printed money like the Yen or US dollar, is closer to a pyramid scheme than Bitcoin. Why? Because fiat money is minted at the top of the pyramid by central banks and then “trickled down” to everyone else. The only problem is, it doesn’t trickle down all that well. It moves out to a few big banks, who either lend it to people or give it to people for their labor. In fact, having a job or getting a loan are the primary methods that people at the bottom of the pyramid get any of the money. In other words, they trade their current time (with a job) or their future time (with a loan) for that money. It’s just that their time is a limited resource and they can only trade so much of it before it runs out. Think of economics as a game. Everyone in the system is a player, looking to maximize their advantage and the advantage of their team (a company, their family and friends, etc.) to get more of the money. But to start the game you need to initially distribute the money or nobody can play. Distributing money sets the playing field. Now if you were in charge of the money, how would you distribute it to the network? You’d want to keep as much of it for yourself as possible, so you’d set the rules to maximize your own personal advantage. Of course you would! That’s what anyone in their right mind would do, maximize their own power to keep it for as long as possible. That’s precisely what the kings and queens of the ancient world did, and that’s what nation states do today. As Naval Ravikant said in his epic series of tweets on blockchain, today’s networks are run by “kings, corporations, aristocracies, and mobs.” “And the Rulers of these networks [are] the most powerful people in society.” That’s why every single system in the history of the world has distributed the money in one way: From the top down. Because it maximizes the advantage of the kings and mobs at the top. Unfortunately, that means most of the money never really leaves the top. It stays right there, as wasted and frozen potential that’s never realized. There is little to no incentive for the money to move. Since money is power, hoarding it is literally hoarding more power and nobody would willingly give up that power. In other words, the game is rigged. What we need is a way to reset the game. Up until now, our prospects looked very dim. For example, we could pass a law, like a Universal Basic Income (UBI). That would give everyone a stream of money, pushing it out across the entire playing field and giving more people a chance to participate in the system. If more people can participate, we unlock all kinds of hidden and untapped value. How many great inventors never managed to create their next breakthrough because they were stuck driving a bus seven days a week to feed their family, with no hope of free time or any clear path to digging themselves out of debt? How many great writers went to their graves never having written their great novel? How many budding scientists never discovered the cure to cancer or heart disease? The problem with all of the plans before now, from UBI to socialism (high taxes on the rich to spread the wealth across the game) is that to redistribute the money after it’s already been distributed is nearly impossible. The people with that money rightfully resist its redistribution. And as Margret Thatcher said: “The trouble with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people’s money.” But what if the money is NOT already distributed? What if we don’t have to take it from anyone at all? That’s the missed opportunity of all of today’s cryptocurrencies. Cryptocurrencies are creating new money. And unlike credit markets, which only pretend to expand the money supply, by lending it out 10x with fractional reserve lending, cryptocurrencies are literally printing money. And they aren’t loaning it to people, they’re giving it to them for their service to the network. It’s like microloans, without the loans. As Naval said: “Society gives you money for giving society what it wants, blockchains give you coins for giving the network what it wants.” So instead of giving all the money to a small group of miners, what if we could do better? A lot better? We can. I outlined one way in the an article about the Cicada project, How We Deliver a Universal Basic Income Right Now and Save Ourselves from the Robots. The Cicada design flips the idea of mining on its head. Everyone on the network is a miner and nobody can have more than one miner. Miners are drafted randomly to keep the network running smoothly. You might be walking along, getting coffee and your phone gets called on to secure the network for a few minutes. After that it goes right back to sleep. As a reward, you might win new coins for doing nothing but having the application on your phone. Simple right? Because everyone is eventually drafted, everyone gets paid, in essence creating a UBI right now. And that’s just one way. If you think about it you can come up with dozens. Oh and don’t get caught up with thinking the only way to do this is with an ID. Lots of ways to randomly draft miners without that too. The key is to free your mind of the “Satoshi box” and think different. What we really need is to completely gamify the delivery of money, distributing it far and wide at the moment of creation. Give it out as rewards for using apps, or as distributed mining fees, or as shared cuts of the mining fees to organizations that provide value to the network are just a few more ways to do it right. Those are just the tip of the iceberg. There are thousands of ways but we just haven’t been thinking about the problem the right way. In other words, we missed the real power of Satoshi’s creation: the distribution of money. The first system that truly gamifies the delivery of money will rocket to exponential growth, upending the current system for good. That will set the initial playing field dynamically and allow players who never would have gotten into the game to compete. The more people who can participate, the more efficient and valuable the network becomes. “Networks have “network effects.” Adding a new participant increases the value of the network for all existing participants.” Right now, we’re not adding new participants fast enough to the cryptonets of tomorrow. The system is still vulnerable to the violence hack. Gamified money is the answer to exponential growth. If the system can grow large enough, fast enough, it will become an unstoppable juggernaut, and the rest of the economic universe will need to come over to the new playing field. Once the Amazons and Google’s of the world join the playing field, their self-preservation instinct will kick in and they’ll want to protect and expand it. And this new network will behave differently. Instead of rewarding just the people at the top, who’ve been rigging the rules in their favor since the beginning of time, the game will completely reset with a new set of rules. What’s best for the whole network, not just the few players at the top, is best. “Blockchains are a new invention that allows meritorious participants in an open network to govern without a ruler and without money. They are merit-based, tamper-proof, open, voting systems. The meritorious are those who work to advance the network. Blockchains’ open and merit based markets can replace networks previously run by kings, corporations, aristocracies, and mobs.” Those that join the network and help it grow will thrive and flourish with it. It will amplify their own value, making it grow faster than at any point in history. Every ounce they give to the system will magnify their own rewards. By cоntrast, economies that stand against the network, attempting to cripple it with arbitrary rules, will pay a heavy price. The system will stretch across the globe and only the most essential rules will take root, because in order to upgrade a distributed system, you need vast consensus across the network. Since people can generally only agree on big, essential solutions, no self-defeating, narrow-minded rules will be allowed. Let’s say that a country decides to restrict ICOs to their citizens altogether or make cryptocurrencies illegal. Instead of killing the network, the rules will blow back on their creators. Only their own people will suffer, as they won’t be able to participate in the explosion of new potential that ICOs bring to the table, draining money out of the economy into rival economies. Even worse, if they make cryptos illegal, they’ll simply drive that money underground, which will keep them from getting tax from their citizens, which will starve them of revenue. As the system spreads it will put people back in control of their own financial power. No one will be able to take your money from you. And that is a good thing. Of course, not everyone thinks so. Some folks always worry that people will do bad things with this power, like commit crimes. But people will always do bad things. They do those things now and they always have. Crippling the system for everyone just to get those people is the height of insanity. It has never worked and it never will. Still, some people will never believe that. They trust their central powers unquestioningly. All you have to do is wrap up your argument in “protecting the children” or “fighting terrorism” and you can generally fool half of the people half of the time about any terrible policy you want. Yet I’ve found that people who see central systems as the answer to everything have usually lived in a stable central system for their whole lives. A few days in an unstable system would change their minds very quickly. Don’t believe me? Imagine you lived in Syria right now. Your central infrastructure is destroyed, as is your money. You don’t want the war, but there’s nothing you can do about it. Now your house is gone, your friends and family are dead, your banks are bombed out and you’re cast out, adrift, homeless and penniless. Even worse, nobody wants you. The world has shifted from open borders to building walls everywhere. You’re not welcome anywhere, you can’t stay where you are and you’re broke. But what if your money was still there, recorded on the blockchain, waiting for you to download and restore a deterministic wallet and give it the right passphrase to restore it? How much easier would it be to start your life over? Cryptocurrencies finally offer a way for us to control our own destiny. For the very first time in the history of the world, we have a way to generate and distribute money without a central power. People will have control over the money they rightfully earned. And even better, instead of setting the playing field so the game is always rigged, we can set the game up the way it was always meant to be played, with open competition and flexible rules in a dynamic system that allows everyone to compete. But we need to think big. We need to find a way to distribute the money far and wide without taking it from everyone else. Do that and we change the game forever.     Sourse: https://hackernoon.com/why-everyone-missed-the-most-mind-blowing-feature-of-cryptocurrency-860c3f25f1fb

"Three Ukrainian startups become winners of 2017 Golden Kitty Awards"

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"Finland invests EUR 6 mln in development of ‘green’ projects in Ukraine"

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29 January, 2018

"Qatar interested in infrastructure projects in Ukraine"

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"AIS entering USED commercial electric vehicle market"

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27 January, 2018

"IMF mission can come to Ukraine in mid-February"

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"Petro Poroshenko sure Ukraine will soon enter top 50 in doing business rating"

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26 January, 2018

"First 4G tender to be held on Jan 31"

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"Ukraine raises electricity exports by 28.6% in 2017"

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25 January, 2018
TIMUR CHMERUK Entrepreneur, partner of the international investment company "Base capital management" UGTI on Facebook Globalization of world economy and Ukraine's place in it The logic of the world market development determines the expediency of each country's participation in the processes of globalization and integration into the world economy. In order for enterprises to participate in the formation of an international economic structure and be competitive, they simply must be under the constant influence of foreign competition. Today, everyone is talking about globalization processes in the world, but what is globalization? This phenomenon is characterized by an increase in the influence of various international factors on the social reality of individual states. Particularly interesting is the impact of globalization on the economy, which is manifested incorporations of a transnational type that function effectively in different parts of the earth and actively take advantage of new historical conditions. Globalization stimulates the strengthening of the interconnection and uniqueness of people, as well as of civilization as a whole. However, in addition to the positive aspects, there are also a number of factors that are alarming. Some scholars suggest that the role of transnational organizations will soon be so great that it can cast doubt on the existence of individual nation states. Therefore, what are the threats of globalization regarding the economy, and how can it improve the economic system of the world? Many experts have great hopes connected with globalization in the field of solving complex economic problems. First and foremost, this is the alignment of the economic situation in the world, the improvement of production, the use of high-quality equipment, the exchange of essential products, the improvement of foreign trade, the effective management of finances, the growth of the well-being of the population in countries provided by a common economic system and the absence of a deficit. But there is also the opposite viewpoint, with which antiglobalists act, actively criticizing any processes of globalization. However, everyone agrees that globalization has opened a new stage in world economic relations. The logic of the world market development determines the expediency of each country's participation in the processes of globalization and integration into the world economy. In order for enterprises to participate in the formation of an international economic structure and be competitive, they simply have to be under the constant influence of foreign competition. Despite this, the problems that globalization engenders are also inevitable. Thus, the globalization of the economy in the modern world faces one serious problem. All the leading positions in the world are already occupied by the states that are members of the "Big Seven". It is their share of not less than 12% of the total population of the planet and about 60-70% of world GDP. They play a decisive role in organizations such as the IMF and the World Bank, the WTO and OECD. The G7 countries form the epicenter of globalization processes, the so-called core of the world economy. Two dozen countries managed to join a group of leaders, establish fruitful and mutually beneficial cooperation with them and are actively developing. The consequences of globalization are not only the clash of cultures but also their dense intertwining. For the West, which has always been ahead, the process of globalization offers quite broad prospects and universal opportunities. All other countries were forced to choose between dependence, isolation, and modernization. With the growth of globalization processes, inequalities between states will also grow, which can lead to the emergence of new conflicts. Therefore, the negative consequences are obvious: developed countries will become even richer, and the poor ones even poorer, as a result of which the gap between them will only increase. According to statistics, only a small part of the population, in particular about 14% of the inhabitants of the Western world, benefit from the processes of globalization. The most negative consequences of this process will be felt by countries with the lowest level of development. There will be a demarcation of society in the economic sphere, a sharp increase of unemployment rate, which is caused by the use of innovative technologies and the introduction of robotization. It is known that with the introduction of technology, the need for a large number of workers is reduced: high-tech equipment simply replaces them.   Future of Ukraine  The globalization of the world economy is not only the formation of a free system of world trade. It is also a process of the rapid development of the productive forces, which requires a new type of production relations not only in a single country but on a global scale. Attempts to limit access of foreign goods to the domestic market by administrative methods or create non-market advantages for their own producers will inevitably provoke a similar reaction from the governments of other countries. In addition, under these circumstances, the government, most likely, will not have the opportunity and motivation to implement those measures that would ensure the competitiveness of domestic producers' products in foreign markets. The liberal model of world trade is determined by the level of technologies and financial instruments that we have today. But creating a great opportunity, the liberal model of the economy forms its very strict rules of the game not in a separate country, but at the global level: either competition or forced bankruptcy. But this is the bankruptcy of not a single enterprise, but whole countries that are slowly but steadily degrading - they are left by citizens who travel around the world in search of a better life. This, unfortunately, is happening today in Ukraine. In order for Ukraine to survive as an independent state, we must do everything to create a competitive economy in our country, both in terms of production costs and in terms of investment attractiveness. At the same time, it is worthwhile to be realistic and to realize that today we have a limited number of advantages that can ensure the competitiveness of Ukrainian economy. In my opinion, it is the raw material structure of Ukrainian economy is the main factor that creates extreme dependence on external influences. It should be recognized that the state of Ukrainian economy and public finances, the level of salaries and the welfare of millions of Ukrainian citizens depend on the prices of raw materials on world markets during the last twenty years. Domestic raw oligarchs are objectively not interested in increasing the salaries and incomes of the population, in the development of the domestic market, because in this case the profitability of their business with obsolete, unmodernized enterprises will decrease. That is why Ukrainian enterprises need to modernize, improve production and quality of products. The state should invest in the development of innovations and technologies, because without this we will continue to lag behind the developed economies of the world, and then we can simply turn into a bankrupt state.     Sourse: https://112.international/article/globalization-of-world-economy-and-ukraines-place-in-it-24663.html

"Foreign investors show large interest in Ukraine House in Davos"

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"Nibulon invests $6 mln in agrimachinery since start of 2018"

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24 January, 2018

"Electric car production in Ukraine four times more profitable than in Germany"

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"Antonov Airlines opens office in Houston"

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23 January, 2018
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Cybersecurity – Why the US And Ukraine Are Cooperating Hromadske Radio (Ukrainian for "Public Radio"), a Ukrainian non-governmental and nonprofit media organization, which aims to create an independent radio broadcasting in Ukraine, recently published an interview on the topic of US-Ukraine cybersecurity cooperation with me and my colleagues Junaid Islam and Stephen Browne. Please have a read and listen in the original English at the first link below or dubbed into Ukrainian at the second link below.     Read more: https://hromadskeradio.org/en/programs/ukraine-calling/cybersecurity-why-the-us-and-ukraine-are-cooperating   Читати: https://hromadskeradio.org/programs/hromadska-hvylya/novyy-etap-spivpraci-u-kiberbezpeci-mizh-ukrayincyamy-ta-amerykancyamy

"EBRD invests EUR 800 mln in Ukraine in 2017"

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"UIA increased passenger traffic by 16.4% in 2017"

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22 January, 2018

"Strategic Advisors group head: FDI should be attracted to Ukraine"

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"Ukraine House opens at World Economic Forum in Davos"

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20 January, 2018

"CMU Has Approved the Concept and Action Plan for Development of Digital Economy in Ukraine until 2020"

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"Ukraine to consider possibility of training highly sought industrial staff according to high German standards"

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19 January, 2018

"Trade between Ukraine, Germany rises by 21.5% in 2017"

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"Poroshenko, Trump to meet at World Economic Forum in Davos"

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18 January, 2018
BERMET TALANT Journalist at the Kyiv Post UGTI on Facebook Key business developments ahead for Ukraine in 2018 Here are the Kyiv Post’s picks for some of the most exciting deals and events coming in the first half of 2018:   4G spectrum auction The faster 4G — a dream for Ukrainian mobile operators and their customers — may soon come true. The state regulator finally set the date for the auction on the 1800 MHz spectrum, which includes the frequency ranges between 1710–1785 MHz and 1805–1880 MHz. The auction is scheduled for Feb. 26. Ukraine launched 3G only three years, more than a decade behind European Union countries. But local providers — Kyivstar, lifecell, and Vodafone — are ready to roll out 4G.   New link with Europe The Beskydy railway tunnel connecting Ukraine with Europe will be open in May, Ukraine state railway company Ukrzaliznytsya announced. The 1,822-meter long tunnel is a section of the fifth Pan-European transport corridor connecting western Ukraine with Italy, Slovenia, Hungary and Slovakia. It will boost Ukraine’s trade capacity with the European Union. ...     Sourse: https://www.kyivpost.com/business/key-business-developments-ahead-ukraine-2018.html

"Ukrainian Pivdenmash to supply 20 engines under European space agency program"

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"Ukrainian DTEK orders 26 wind turbines from General Electric"

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17 January, 2018

"Canadian, U.S. defense ministers discuss support for Ukraine"

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"Foreign Minister of Ukraine sees increased interest in Ukraine from German businessmen"

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16 January, 2018
MONICA GREEN Author, Technological geek UGTI on Facebook Bitcoin Gains More Popularity in Ukraine Ukraine is considered as an immensely important region for both Bitcoin and cryptocurrency. Although we barely take notice of this Eastern European country, fascinating things are transpiring there. For the moment, the local government is working on some sort of regulation about the current issue. However, it may still take quite a while, a few months or so, until that happens. Two of the most Google-searched words in the country right now are “Bitcoin” and “Mining.” Not totally shocking, considering the country’s access to relatively cheap electricity. Ukraine is about to play a huge role in the future of cryptocurrency. A good example of this is the fact that there is already a thriving Bitcoin and altcoin community. Moreover, local legislators are now taking steps on introducing regulations for cryptocurrency, which of course is not going to be a walk in the park. At present, the general public is expressing their approval of cryptocurrency in various ways. In 2017 alone, searches for the terms Bitcoin and Mining are unprecedented. This is quite fascinating since many people do not view Ukraine as a top Bitcoin mining hub.   Bitcoin thrives in Ukraine On the other hand, there is the accessibility to cheap electricityin the country. For anyone planning to put up a Bitcoin or altcoin mining operation, Ukraine is worth exploring. This positive momentum also benefits the local residents, as they can earn a lot from their mining activities. This extra revenue is direly needed since the country is undergoing massive inflation. This predicament has been worsening since 2013 with prices for basic necessities keep going high. Paying 18% more for basic needs like food, compared to one year ago is never a good sign. As of the moment, it is still quite uncertain whether Ukraine will implement a Bitcoin and altcoins regulation. While the government has every intention of doing so, it is still uncertain if they can successfully do it. There is a very small difference between regulation and innovation. This is particularly true when dealing with cryptocurrencies no matter what part of the world you are. However, there has yet to be an official guideline regarding this matter. Nevertheless, this situation may still change in the coming months. As long as Bitcoin lingers in the gray area, things look relatively positive for the world’s top cryptocurrency. More particularly, the Ukrainian government has to consider a number of legislative proposals. Although a draft legalizing cryptocurrencies received a positive feedback, nothing is definitely sure. Presenting legal definitions of cryptocurrencies in every possible situation would require a lot of time and effort. It will be entertaining to wait and see how this will conclude in this part of the globe. It is definitely possible Ukraine will set an example for most Eastern European countries regardless of the outcome of this regulatory fiasco.     Sourse: https://www.coinwire.com/bitcoin-gains-more-popularity-in-ukraine

"Ukraine to speed up attraction of investments in renewable energy with International Renewable Energy Agency"

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"SPF to lease site of 60,000 sq m in Chornobyl to build solar power plant"

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15 January, 2018

"Britain notes Ukraine's success in global data openness ratings"

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"U.S. ready to help Ukraine create Financial Intelligence Service"

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13 January, 2018

"Canadian TIU builds 10.5 MW solar power plant in Dnipropetrovsk region"

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"IFC invests EUR 30 mln in Ukrainian packaging firm"

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12 January, 2018

"Ukraine’s Antonov applies for U.S. permit to haul SpaceX's oversized cargo"

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"Ukraine's increased cooperation with China - major 2017 achievement - ministry"

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11 January, 2018
ANNA KYSLYTSKA Analyst at Internews Ukraine and UkraineWorld UGTI on Facebook Business is cautiously optimistic about Ukraine, though many problems still remain As the third year of reforms in Ukraine draws to a close, current and potential international investors are calculating risks with an eye on the economy failures and revealed political liabilities, including the recent slowdown in anti-corruption reform, not to mention the ongoing Russian-provoked war in Eastern Ukraine. Investors are giving it a shot for the robust IT sector and the massive energy resources market and agriculture, as their numbers have been growing slowly but steadily since 2015. According to the survey conducted by the Dragon Capital and the European Business Association, the share of foreign investors who decided to invest in Ukraine or were actively seeking business opportunities in the country has increased: 40% and 22% in 2017 compared to 37% and 18% in 2016 of all investors in Ukraine, respectively. For those companies already investing in Ukraine, this year was marked by little, yet important, achievements of the government. They included the openness of state data, steps noticed in deregulation, the development of electronic services (in particular, the electronic system of VAT refunds), simplification of the procedure for obtaining permits for building construction, a moratorium on inspections, easing of currency control, establishment of the institution of private performers, the adoption of the law on squeeze-out (on minority shareholders). As the Executive Director of the European Business Association, Anna Derevyanko, notes, the year started quite successfully for many industries: “During the past 6 months our member companies registered the government’s special attention towards the development of innovation, IT and creative economy, capacity building, the opening of additional research centers and terminals, expansion or consolidation of networks.” Gradual economic growth is noted by the EBRD, which is the largest international financial investor in Ukraine. According to the November report, Ukraine maintained positive dynamics in the first half of 2017, growing by 2.5% year-on-year in the first quarter and by an estimated 2.3% year-on-year in the second quarter. The EBRD forecast for the Ukrainian economy’s growth was 2% in 2017 and 3% in 2018. These are quite promising numbers against the 12% decline in 2015, 6.8% decline in 2014 and zero growth in 2013: “Ukraine has done more to reform its economy in the last 3-4 years after the Euromaidan revolution than it did in the previous 22 years,” says The World Bank Country Director for Belarus, Moldova, and Ukraine, Satu Kahkonen. The country“adopted decisive reforms in response to the deep economic crisis in 2014 and 2015. These reforms have helped stabilise the economy, reduce macroeconomic imbalances and produce modest economic growth.” The Doing Business 2018 Report shows positive but slow changes where Ukraine occupies 76th place, rising by four positions since the previous year. However, the component indicators vary significantly: receiving loans, resolving insolvency, enforcing contracts, cross-border trading and getting electricity is close to or below the level of 100 out of a possible 190. These results are not very encouraging: for Ukraine to rise in the rating and catch up with at least its neighbours it has to grow by 20-30 positions a year. The Ministry of Economic Development has estimated that ten points in the ranking are equivalent to about 1 billion dollars in additional annual inflow of investment into the economy. Dmytro Shimkiv, the Deputy Chief of the Administration of the President of Ukraine, recently told UNIAN news agency that investors are primarily interested not in the actual position of countries, but rapid and spectacular growth. Satu Kahkonen says that the current growth of 2% is not enough to make a significant difference: “After a deep economic crisis, the catch-up growth during recovery is typically much higher—a multiple of what we are observing today in Ukraine”. Ms Kahkonen names critical steps for reducing risks for domestic and foreign investors: “the strengthening of impartial and transparent enforcement of the rule of law and anti-corruption measures, further streamlining procedures for permits, licenses, and inspections, as well as increasing the use of electronic solutions, and strengthening enforcement of competition legislation to level the playing field between the private sector and state-owned companies.” According to a survey by Dragon Capital, investors suggest that the Ukrainian government should focus on productive anti-corruption activities, ensuring the rule of law for law-enforcement agencies, reforming the judicial system and, notably, the timely implementation of the IMF program. At the same time, the continuous support of the EBRD and the World Bank gives investors good signs for investing in Ukraine. In June 2017, the World Bank Group Board endorsed the new 5-year Country Partnership Framework for Ukraine. “At the moment, we are preparing a new Development Policy Operation to support the adoption and implementation of key policy reforms to accelerate economic growth and bring public services to people,” says Ms Kahkonen. The World Bank is also waiting for land reform to “move forward with support to agricultural, land and irrigation development to help tap Ukraine’s potential,” adds Ms Kahkonen. It is too early to draw the year balance, yet the Ministry of Economic Development and Trade of Ukraine delivered the results of the 6-month period. According to the report for January-June 2017, foreign investors from 75 countries of the world invested $711.2 million worth of direct investment in the economy of Ukraine, which is 1.9 times less than for the same period in 2016. Slow economic growth and reform implementation make investors act more carefully, but don’t drive them away. According to the Ukraine Investment Promotion Office’s UkraineInvest quarterly report, Ukrainian regions are becoming more attractive for investors in the agribusiness, energy, infrastructure, and manufacturing sectors. That is, Western Ukraine is becoming one of the most extensive automobile parts manufacturing clusters in Eastern Europe, a wood processing cluster is being raised in Zhytomyr, agro-processing and port logistics are evolving in Mykolayiv and Kherson Regions, while energy and manufacturing clusters are opening in Eastern Ukraine. As local investments retain the flow and the traditionally strong national sectors of agriculture and energy demonstrate rising productivity, the country continues its fight for a better tomorrow.     Sourse: http://euromaidanpress.com/2018/01/05/business-is-cautiously-optimistic-about-ukraine-though-many-problems-still-remain/

"Ukraine's central bank mulls introduction of blockchain-based e-hryvnia"

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"Kyiv airport boosts passenger traffic by 64.2% in 2017"

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10 January, 2018

"World Bank retains stable outlook for growth in Ukraine until 2020"

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"Ukraine raises exports of titanium ore by 26% in 2017"

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9 January, 2018
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Aleks Mehrle Letter to the Editor of Fletcher Magazine Thank you Fletcher Magazine for publishing my letter to the editor commenting on the fantastic article by Heather Stephenson titled "The Reformers" and published in the Summer 2017 issue. Please enjoy the Winter 2017 edition of Fletcher Magazine in which you can find my letter to the editor on page 2.     Link: https://issuu.com/fletchermagazinespring2015/docs/fletcher_magazine_winter_2017_no_cl

"Ukraine sees 54.9% rise in revenue from exports of electricity in 2017"

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"Ukraine’s local budgets to receive 100% of proceeds from single tax paid by farmers"

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8 January, 2018

"Govt permits biofarma plasma to export blood preparations in 2018"

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"Pope urges international community not to forget about conflict in Ukraine"

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6 January, 2018

"Ukraine looking for unconventional, liberal solutions to improve investment climate, boost economic growth"

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"Ukraine's international reserves increased by 21% for past year - NBU"

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5 January, 2018

"FTA with Turkey is Ukraine’s key priority for 2018 – ambassador"

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"West should create fund for Ukraine with $6 bln per year - Carpenter"

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4 January, 2018
ANDRIY KOLODYUK Founder and Managing Partner of AVentures Capital UGTI on Facebook Ukraine shall become global “IT and crypto-offshore” Ukraine is the only world’s country that managed to create 100% private IT field. This is because the state steered almost clear of this process. Now we have the chance to become the global platform in the field of ICO and blockchain. The only thing that shall be done by the state is not to bother. The market will regulate itself. De jure, all the Ukrainian business is in the offshore zones. According to various estimates, up to 75% of Ukrainian export is crossing over through offshore companies. $5 bln. is siphoned off every year through offshore jurisdictions. Startups are no exception – on frequent occasions they are incorporated outside the territory Ukraine, but for some other reasons. If company is aimed at global market, then it has nothing to do, but to open its sales offices across the globe and to be registered there. Or, this shall be done in core target markets, at least. Thus, the companies, whose major customers are located is the States – legal entities in the USA – is the only condition for them to handle selling there. This is the distinctive feature not for the Ukrainian startups only. Offshore scheme provides business with an opportunity to pay less taxes by legal means. On the other hand, offshore gets extra revenues. But how Ukraine, whose companies are currently being registered in offshore zones, may “make profit” of this situation? For many consecutive years I stand for the idea as follows: we shall stop blaming offshores and shall become IT-offshore. As soon as this is done, we will raise investments. Let’s get a view of Cyprus, for instance. In these latter days, it is making concentrated efforts to attract IT-business, and we could compete with it. Just a very short while ago, everyone was discussing the innovations introdused by Belarus. Upon completion of ten-year long experiment with the Innovation Park, one decree was adopted in the country. This decree makes Belarus IT and crypto-offshore in the public eye. This initiative may become a magnet that will boost the inflow of investments. However, this is also a threat for the CIS market (Ukraine, Russia, etc.): some business entities may move to Belarus in search for more comfortable conditions, since it is much more easier and simpler compared to Cyprus or the USA. I will repeat myself and say that this will be a major threat for us when business departs from Ukraine. Our only remedy is to create similar competitive conditions in the short run. We have been working for a long time to turn Ukraine into “global IT/crypto offshore” favorable for global IT companies operation not only de jure, but de facto as well. Some time ago our Ukrainian Venture Capital and Private Equity Association (UVCA) has established Blockchain Committee, whose goal is very simple: for the ICO to be performed in Ukraine as the investment raising tool. We work with the government, with the Cabinet of Ministers, for instance. We show the opportunities and arrive at a consensus. Those, who work in top corner offices, already know what bitcoin stands for. But we shall switch from perception to market evolution conditions arrangement. What conditions we are talking about. We need no special legislation for ICO or benefits for blockchain-projects implementation. From a legal perspective, the coast is clear for the ICO to be conducted in Ukraine. I believe that Ukraine will soon make its first transaction. For Ukraine to become “Cyprus for ICO-projects”, the state shall conduct hands-off policy and shall let the market regulate itself – by efforts of the community and such industrial groups as UVCA Committee, Bitcoin Foundation, etc. Therefore, our message to the state is very simple: it just so happened, that you did not help IT guys and now this is the third branch of Ukrainian economy. Therefore, at the very least, please stay out of the way of further development (though, nevertheless we’d really appreciate if someone helps us). Ukraine is the only country that managed to create 100% private IT field. I’m saying this all over the earth, and, I’d go as far as saying, this blows the mind. The state shares the same message too from its own part. When the Minister of Economic Affairs declares that IT is the third our field as to the export, everyone understands that this is true. All the member state of the European Union, Israel, Silicon Valley – their IT field was initiated and supported using the state funds, taxpayers’ funds. I will tell how does the self-regulation occurs, using UVCA as an example. We do not accept to our Association anyone who feels like it. If investor having high money but ill fame comes to us, we give him a cold shoulder. In precisely this way the self-regulation works: it chops off those, who may do damage to ecosystem and to the market. Every investor has both “black list” of startups that will never be invested by him for some reason or another and the list of investors, not suitable for syndications. Other regulation may take place under existing laws. This is a normal practice. If someone has stolen something from you via ICO, then general legislation will sort this out. We promote Ukraine abroad as a new technology partner. We are talking about the economics and about the new place of Ukraine in the global capital allocation. “Ukraine is your partner, and that’s why…”. We do not fooling around with a begging bowl, just the other way round – we show our personal example. Portfolio of our AVentures Capital has 12 companies. Almost all of them, except for us, have international investors, who were taken on not without our contribution. We invest by ourselves and invite others to do so. Personal example is the best signal for international investors. During the World Economic Forum, which will traditionally take place in January in Davos, we will organize Ukrainian House for the first time. As I mentioned before, its goal is to represent Ukraine as a new technology partner. Our broad topic: “Ukraine: creativity, innovations, opportunities” we will show the investment opportunities in Ukrainian IT to the worldwide leaders of business, technology, and investments. We hold nearly 10 various events in Davos to tell as much as it is possible about the opportunities in Ukraine, such as investment panel discussion, AgroTech panel discussion, “Kyiv city as a global Tech Hub” panel discussion, etc. Ukrainian House shall become the unique place for bilateral meetings of startups and world-class venture capital persons from across the world. Moreover, we separate panel discussions dedicated to ICO and crypto currencies “Where is crypto-harbor’s future” and “Is Blockchain safe enough to become the Internet 2.0”. We want to present Ukraine as the place for ICO conduction and to explain the distinguishing features of regulation and non regulation of this field in Ukraine. “Ukraine is the place where ICO of global company may be made,” – this is our message to the whole world, and it would be nice if the state could be the bearer of this idea on the world stage. Ukrainian House will become the chance of a lifetime to show vivid and dynamic European country – Ukraine, and to show people, who live in it and create global innovative companies.     Sourse: https://innovationhouse.org.ua/en/columns/ukrayne-nuzhno-stat-myrovym-it-y-kryptoofshorom/

"Leader of Ukrainian auto market Toyota raises sales by 26% in 2017"

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"Fiscal revenue of Ukraine's consolidated budget almost 27% up in 2017"

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3 January, 2018

"Ukrenergo will implement ERP system based on Microsoft platform"

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"Some 31,000 successful tenders to procure medicines in ProZorro system held in 2017"

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2 January, 2018
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Happy New Year Ukraine! On behalf of UGTI team around the world, we would like to wish you all a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous 2018. We made a lot of progress in last 12 months, so did Ukraine. All signs are pointing to a breakthrough year for Ukraine in 2018. Things will change and they will change for the better. During this time of year, we all take time to reflect back and look into the future. None of us can change the past but we can definitely impact the future. Me and my partner Aleks Mehrle, done a great deal to promote positives about Ukraine and the opportunities Ukraine represents to investors and strategic partners world-wide. We are looking to do much more in 2018. Our focus for 2018 would be primarily on execution of projects related to Cybersecurity, Blockchain, Electrical Vehicle Infrastructure and Alternative Energy in Ukraine. We want to thank all of our readers and supporters. We are looking forward working much closer with a lot of you in 2018. Happy New Year!

"Ukraine tops ratings of largest gainers in ease of doing business since 2010 – FT"

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"Energy Efficiency Fund begins its work in Ukraine"

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1 January, 2018

"Japan simplifies visa requirements for Ukrainians from January 1"

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"EBRD to provide EUR 150 mln loan for modernization of Dolynska-Mykolaiv-Kolosivka railway track"

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30 December, 2017

"Bloomberg: Stocks of Ukrainian companies are most profitable in 2017"

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"Ukrainian agro-industrial complex will gain record government support in 2018"

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29 December, 2017

"Ukrgazvydobuvannia announces tender for drilling another 42 wells for UAH 6.3 bln"

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"Ukraine expands industrial rocket building cooperation with south-eastern Asian countries"

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28 December, 2017

"About 2,000 ESCO projects can be implemented in Ukraine in 2018 – Savchuk"

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"EBRD issues EUR25 mln loan to MHP to build biogas plant"

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27 December, 2017

"Poroshenko signs law on Ukraine's accession to International Renewable Energy Agency"

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"EBRD issues EUR25 mln loan to MHP to build biogas plant"

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26 December, 2017

"Borschahivsky Chemical Plant wins UNDP tender on oncohematology due to well-balanced price offer"

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"Ukrainian exports grow by 20% in 2017"

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25 December, 2017

"Canada will help implement world standards of strategic planning at Ukraine's Cabinet"

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"Experts presented to the President a draft law on the Anticorruption court that will be submitted to the Parliament"

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23 December, 2017

"Economy ministry estimates Ukraine's GDP growth at 2.3% in Jan-Sept 2017"

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"PM Groysman expects defense industry to drive Ukrainian economy in 2018"

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22 December, 2017

"Ukraine’s exports to Canada in 2017 up by 76%, and imports by 93% "

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"AVentures Capital invests over $3.5 mln in Ukrainian companies"

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21 December, 2017
DIRK MATTHEISEN Writer/blogger political economy and independent consultant institutional governance UGTI on Facebook Why I am optimistic about Ukraine Buffeted by rapacious oligarchs and invasion by Russia, Ukraine seems an unlikely success story. However, renewed economic growth is fueling a growing sense of optimism and of opportunity. There are a few things getting in the way. But first the good news. Ukraine’s economy is projected to grow 2.0% this year and then accelerate to 3.5% in 2018 and 4.0% in 2019, driven by a steady growth in consumption of 3% per year and in exports of 1.6% in 2017, 3% in 2018 and 5% in 2019 (recent government estimates of growth are slightly lower but still very similar). Already in 2017 exports to the EU in the first nine months are up 29.1%, which indicates the rapid pace at which Ukraine is taking advantage of access to EU markets). The business press is full of stories about new businesses and investment opportunities, including highly innovative, internationally competitive startups, such as Google’s Grammarly, which was developed by two Ukrainian entrepreneurs in Kyiv, as well as countless “locally-grown” tech startups and micro-enterprises. There is constant chatter about fashion and advertising video shoots in Kyiv, including the recent Apple Watch 3 video, adding cultural flair to the economic momentum. Ukraine Finance Minister Oleksandr Danyliuk said all the right things in September in the lead up to the World Bank/IMF annual meetings. He pointed to the government’s tough measures to stabilize the economy with the support of a US$17.5b IMF program. He also emphasized the seriousness of the government’s efforts to improve the business climate, such as in tax and customs administration for which Ukraine had hired an international consultancy firm to help run an anti-corruption program and invited the US, Germany, EU, EBRD, and Canada to sit on the supervisory board to ensure the program was not derailed. Danyliuk emphasized that many reforms had been instituted, but it was also now important for the people to feel the effect through improved living standards by not just eliminating high level corruption but of eliminating petty day-to-day corruption. For example, the World Bank estimates that reforming land ownership laws alone could lift economic growth by 1.5%. This is critical because, as welcome as 4% GDP growth may be, Ukraine has to grow faster for people to feel, as Danyliuk emphasized, a meaningful impact on their well-being. At $2,200, Ukraine’s GDP per capita is roughly a quarter of Russia’s (though more equitably distributed) and among the lowest among the former Soviet republics; to counter Russia’s existential threat to the country,Ukraine needs to increase GDP per capita by several orders of magnitude to demonstrate that its economic model can deliver benefits comparable to other countries. To visualize Ukraine’s economic potential, compare its GDP of about $93 bn to Poland’s GDP of about $480 bn with roughly half the area of Ukraine and the same population. Twenty-five years of serious economic reform separate Polish GDP from Ukraine’s. A more serious effort by Ukraine is necessary to make up the difference in a shorter period of time. As Poland shows, economic growth does not solve all the problems, but it is an essential start. To make that happen, Ukraine has to get a grip on pervasive corruption that is fueled by lack of respect for the law, ineffective law enforcement and widespread self-interest over civic interest in government and business. Rule of law was the core of the 2014 Revolution of Dignity which, despite substantial progress, remains an aspiration. Above all, reform has to be credible. Liberalizing the land market is useless without a reliable cadastral system and market transparency that prevents raiding and speculation. Judicial reform is useless if incompetent or corrupt officials continue to be appointed. The recent appointment of 25 judges with histories of questionable decisions and improbable wealth undermines reform. Criminal charges against public officials, such as those against Ukraine’s General Prosecutor, Yuriy Lutsenko, need to be prosecuted in accordance with the highest legal standards and not subverted by legal artifice that fails to hold wrongdoers accountable. Lack of progress will erode vital international support (as evidenced by the recent halt due to unfulfilled anti-corruption conditions in the EU’s macro-financialassistance program and a slowed IMF program). Political reform is integral to ending corruption and achieving economic success. For reform to work, the political process has to serve society’s needs. It can’t if the political and economic elite, including President Poroshenko and members of his government, behave as in the past. The reformists can try to wait out the entrenched interests, risking that the reform process will peter out; or, they can find ways to breath additional life into the process. Civic activism is essential; and entrenched interests have to support the reform process, which may require some form of selective amnesty for economic crimes committed before the Revolution of Dignity, which these interests fear will expose them to prosecution, and a commitment that they not stand in the way of or undermine further reform. Entrenched interests will not disappear, but they must be made to fall in line. Timing is crucial. The 2019 presidential election is warming up. It can be a watershed moment in surmounting corruption. President Poroshenko has been effective in leading the economic stabilization program with the IMF and in introducing many of the needed reforms. His resolute defense of Ukraine internationally and support for association with the EU has elevated recognition in the West of Ukraine as a democratic nation distinct and separate from Russia. However, he has also failed to live up to personal commitments as president, including putting his extensive business interestsahead of the national interest by forming a blind trust; many of his businesses are held in offshore corporations of the type that are used by oligarchs to hide assets and avoid taxes. Extraordinarily wealthy individuals fuel corruption if not checked by law, and they have yet to yield or share power in Ukraine with the next generation of business, government and political leaders who will build the new Ukrainian society. The 2019 election is a good moment for anti-corruption and political reform not just to be declared but to become real in order to unleash the rewards of reform. Though the protests have been small, the political risk is not. The “impeach Poroshenko” protest, again led by Saakashvili, is a portent of worse to come if reform is derailed. Public unhappiness will grow, especially if the politically unpopular Porochenko continues to provoke friction with highhanded political assaults on Saakashvili and other opponents and backroom maneuvers to enforce his control of the government. The focus needs to be on advancing anti-corruption and economic reforms and upholding the rule of law, including in politics. Messy disputes (such as this) between anti-corruption authorities and security services and mutual claims of corruption don’t help. For all the risks, the promise of change is irreversible. Ukrainian society is no longer capable of sliding back into conformity and submission. Ukraine’s transformation into a more just and inclusive society is in its early stages but even now entrenched interests cannot contain Ukrainian society’s new aspirations nor its new economic promise. Fundamentally, what distinguishes Ukraine is not its historic association with Russia. Cast between competing empires (and sometimes known as the borderlands), Ukraine has a powerful egalitarian tradition based on the independent-minded Cossack warrior-farmer (reviled during Russian-dominated Soviet times as kulaks). This tradition is a distinct cultural identifier setting Ukrainian society apart from a more hierarchical and authoritarian Russian society, something Stalin understood as a threat and attempted to extinguish through state-sponsored genocide in the 1930s. Completing the key reforms today will transform Ukraine into a democratic nation and an economic power in Europe. In the future, when one speaks of Ukraine–a strong European nation at the heart of a unified Europe—one will be able to say that it’s democratic institutions were formed on its distinctive traditions that Russian imperialism failed to crush and on the renewed vitality of its civil society.     Sourse: http://euromaidanpress.com/2017/12/16/why-i-am-optimistic-about-ukraine/#arvlbdata

"Uber opens office in Kyiv, appoints Oleksiy Stakh general manager for Central and Eastern Europe"

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"Volume of Ukrainian exports increased by 20.9% this year"

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20 December, 2017

"Naftogaz Ukrainy plans to place eurobonds worth $1 bln in 2018"

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"IKEA may open first outlet in Kyiv within two years "

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19 December, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Extending the U.S.-Ukraine Cybersecurity Partnership: A Track “1.5” Initiative The bilateral relationship between the United States and Ukraine in the area of cybersecurity is still evolving. Yet the two countries face many of the same cyber threats and share certain interests. Against this background, the current context presents an opportunity to expand and deepen bilateral cyber ties, in order to build both capabilities and resilience. Such ties must go beyond government and ensure that companies, who find themselves on the frontlines of the cyber battlefield, help chart the path ahead. As a first step, the two sides must each organize themselves for cyber-success. This means taking measures within government, forging bonds between the public and private sectors, transacting prudently from company to company, and taking steps within each business to advance cybersecurity. While each country must organize consistent with its history and culture, there are lessons learned to be from international experience. To discuss these challenges and work towards solutions, best practices, and other joint goals we have joined forces with a leading cybersecurity team within a US university that will convene a task force, composed of select U.S. and Ukrainian technology, policy and thought leaders. Member-only activities will include networking opportunities and roundtable discussions featuring key experts, interlocutors, and decision makers; and issues of priority concern and interest to Ukraine and the U.S. Events may be convened either on or off the record (or as a hybrid of the two) depending on the group’s preference. There is a window of opportunity to shape and define the future U.S.-Ukraine relationship on a critical set of cyber issues facing both our governments and industries. We intend to seize that window by establishing a new U.S.-Ukraine policy initiative to serve as a center of gravity for policy and research on cybersecurity. Stay tuned for updates, media interviews by key team members in the US and Ukraine and a forthcoming OpEd.

"Ambassador of Norway gets acquainted with potential of Chernihiv region and expresses interest in grain export"

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"IT sector ranked third in Ukraine’s exports last year "

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18 December, 2017

"Ukraine, Portugal sign memorandum on cooperation in energy efficiency and renewable energy"

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"Cabinet intends to adopt deregulation package abolishing over 300 regulations"

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16 December, 2017

"Kyiv airport to increase passenger traffic by more than 60% in 2017, more than 30% in 2018"

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"Ukraine exported agricultural products worth 14.7 bln dollars for 10 months"

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15 December, 2017

"Imports of electric cars to Ukraine in Jan-Nov 13% more than during entire 2016 – fiscal service"

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"IMF mission to visit Ukraine in the beginning of 2018"

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14 December, 2017
SATU KAHKONEN World Bank Country Director for Belarus, Moldova, and Ukraine UGTI on Facebook Ukraine Can Boost Annual Output by US$15 Billion with Land Reform Land reform — lifting the moratorium on agriculture land sales — is the most powerful measure the government can take to boost economic growth and job creation, particularly in rural areas. More than 70 percent—some 43 million hectares — of Ukrainian territory is classified as agricultural land. And that land is exceptionally fertile: Ukraine has one-third of the world’s black soil. But despite this abundance, agricultural yields in the country are only a fraction of those in other European countries whose land is not of the same quality. This is because land users have little incentive to invest in land management, as neither land owners nor users know if, when, or how the moratorium will be lifted. Moreover, getting credit is difficult and costly as land cannot be used as collateral. Meaningful reform of the land sector must include providing incentives for long-term investment and proper land management, access to credit, and transfer of land to its most productive uses. The resulting boost to agricultural productivity could add US$15 billion to annual output and increase annual GDP by about 1.5 percentage points. And it would boost public revenue — up to US$2 billion from the one-time sale of state land and US$250 million annually from land leases — freeing precious budget space for schools, hospitals and infrastructure. It would also allow land owners to get a fair return on their most valuable asset. Today, rental prices for agricultural land in Ukraine are a fraction of their market value. Indeed, some 4.5 million small land owners, often retirees, currently receive 10-20 percent of annual income from renting out their land at rates about a tenth of the level in EU countries, and well below developing countries like Argentina and Brazil. This is unfair to landowners and is strangling the livelihoods and future prospects of the country’s rural population. The economic case for lifting the moratorium is clear. But unless this is done transparently, the risks may outweigh the benefits. In a country that has seen enormous public wealth disappear through corruption and theft, and with public institutions charged with the prevention of this kind of malfeasance yet to demonstrate their effectiveness, many fear that any change to the current system will lead to concentration of land in the hands of the elite. Thus, beyond the economic reforms/measures listed above, fair and transparent reform of Ukraine’s land market would demonstrate to Ukrainians — and the world — that the country can ensure that its unique natural resources can benefit all of its citizens. The good news is that such an outcome is possible if the government follows through on actions it is taking on several fronts. First, making land markets transparent: Building public trust in agricultural land markets will require information from registry and cadastre to be integrated and accurate. Prices — at least at the aggregate level — for land rental and sales should be public. And transactions need to be transparent. Measures, such as the use of e-services in the Cadaster and mandatory e-auctions for rental of state land, should be extended to sales. Second, informing land owners of their rights: To use their land most effectively, land owners need to be aware of their rights. One way to achieve this, that has broad support, would be to upgrade the technical and operational capacity of the Parliamentary Ombudsman for Human Rights with the establishment of a Land Ombudsman. That would help provide land owners unbiased legal advice on questions regarding their land rights, and help access the judicial system and get redress if these rights are violated. Third, facilitating access to finance for farmers: Nearly two decades ago the Peruvian economist Hernando de Soto published The Mystery of Capital, in which he identified the link between property rights and economic development. His simple but groundbreaking observation was that worldwide, trillions of dollars of “dead capital” were frozen because poor people did not enjoy the full ownership of their land, including the ability to leverage its value to borrow capital. In Ukraine, the moratorium on land sales has prevented land owners from using their most valuable asset as collateral, making it impossible to access credit to expand production or start a new business. With an appropriate regulatory environment, transparent land sales markets would facilitate much-needed rural investment and enable banks to extend credit to family farmers and rural SMEs. Work on instruments to fast-track development of rural financial markets is already progressing, including working with farmers’ associations to train farmers with no history of credit or record keeping on how to put together viable business proposals. Land reform will be challenging, but the rewards to rural Ukraine, and ultimately to the entire country, promise to be transformative. Moreover, given Ukraine’s potential as a commodities exporter, reform of the sector would impact food security globally. Fortunately, the Government has taken important first steps in the right direction. It has made land reform a priority and begun critical preparatory measures discussed above. So, for the sake of the Ukrainian people and the country's economic prospects, I hope the authorities and politicians have the vision and courage to lift the moratorium this year, so that Ukraine’s potential will finally be tapped.     Sourse: http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/opinion/2017/10/02/ukraine-can-boost-annual-output-us15-billion-with-land-reform

"Dragon Capital buying logistics complex near Kyiv"

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"NBU expects to receive two tranches worth $3.5 bln from IMF in 2018"

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13 December, 2017

"Rothschild calls greatest achievement and biggest failure of Ukrainian reforms"

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"Economy ministry proposes creating ‘digital’ governmental committee"

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12 December, 2017
MAKAR PASENIUK Head of Investment Banking at Investment Capital Ukraine (ICU) UGTI on Facebook Agriculture, Infrastructure, Energy Sectors are most promising for investment In Ukraine The increase in internal and external investment is the key factor for accelerating the economic growth in Ukraine in coming years, and the most promising sectors for the next two years are agriculture, infrastructure and energy sectors, Managing Partner of ICU Investment Group Makar Paseniuk has said. Speaking at the Ukrainian Financial Forum organized by ICU in Odesa on September 21 and September 22, he said that capital investment in Q2 2017 grew to 15.4% of GDP from 15.1% in 2016 and 13% in 2015, although they should be at least 20-25% of GDP for the desired economic growth. Explaining his selection of the sectors, Paseniuk said that in agriculture, infrastructure and energy sectors Ukraine has a global competitive advantage or needs to develop them to ensure the long-term economic stability. As an example, he took the capacities in power generation and energy supply, estimating the necessary amount of investments to restore their operating lives, which have already been exhausted by 70-80%, at $15-20 billion. "Market prices and transparent, unchanging rules will create conditions for the investment in the extraction, transportation and distribution of gas, oil, coal, and electricity, and the development of competition in these sectors will ensure minimum prices for consumers, while bringing Ukraine closer to energy independence," he said. Paseniuk also said that the farmland market is the reserve for attracting $15-20 billion of investments. In his view, the formation of the market could begin with state-owned land. He added that preference should be given to direct investments than debt financing, and in terms of currency this should be a financial tool nominated in hryvnias. Completion of cleaning the balance sheets of financial institutions from low-quality assets should increase the activity of the Ukrainian financial sector and its involvement in investment, according to the expert. Paseniuk said that an important factor for growth of investments is justice, the presence of transparent and unchanging rules of the game. "Therefore, one of the priorities for all should be judicial reform, which will ensure real protection of property rights and impartiality of decisions made by courts," he said.     Sourse: https://inventure.com.ua/en/news/ukraine/agriculture-infrastructure-energy-sectors-are-most-promising-for-investment-in-ukraine

"Ukrnafta resumes production in six fields"

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"Ukraine's Fiscal Service boasts revenues from single social security tax"

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11 December, 2017

"Ukraine’s SPF approves list of companies for privatization in 2018"

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"EU-Ukraine economic cooperation gains pace, showing 29% bilateral trade growth"

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9 December, 2017

"Trade turnover between Ukraine and Lithuania increases by 45% in 2017 - Poroshenko"

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"Norway contributes EUR 950,000 to CoE Action Plan for Ukraine in 2018-2021"

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8 December, 2017

"Polish funds invest EUR 400,000 in Ukrainian fintech-startup"

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"Foreign medicines to be registered in Ukraine under simplified procedure"

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7 December, 2017
AISHA DOWN Editor at The Ukraine Business Journal UGTI on Facebook Ukraine’s IT Industry Could Near $10 Billion by 2025 KYIV -- Ukraine’s dynamic IT outsourcing sector could more than double in the next decade, reaching $8.4 billion in 2025, according to Stanislav Sheliakin, a senior consultant at PricewaterhouseCoopers, speaking the Ukrainian Software Development Forum. That’s only if the government comes through with vital reforms to protect intellectual property rights and breathe life into outdated labor laws, he added on Friday. Sheliakin’s projection, derived from PwC’s industry studies, suggests a more moderate pace of growth for Ukraine’s IT sector than the past decade, which saw 10-fold industry growth, according to Chirag Rawat, deputy director of Avasant, an international consulting firm. Rawat and Sheliakin were among 50 speakers at the Forum, which brought together hundreds of participants—among them government officials and corporate leaders—to discuss the outlook of Ukraine’s IT. Like Sheliakin, most were optimistic about Ukraine’s potential. Mr. Rawat, who spoke on the global perception of Ukraine as an IT outsourcing destination, cited Ukraine’s talented tech grads as an edge. “Now in Ukraine there are more than 100 research centers of large international companies,” he said, adding that Ukraine had a competitive advantage in niches like blockchain technology and game development. However, the war, perceptions of corruption, and fears about data security still made foreign businesses leery about opening shop here, said Rawat, a native of India. Speaking after the forum, Sheliakin said outdated regulations were a far more significant obstacle than corruption—or even the war.   Independent contractors and IT intellectual property protection “Most Ukrainian IT professionals would like to work as independent contractors,” he said. Independent contractors avoid a mandatory 18 percent payroll tax. Instead, they pay the 5 percent independent contractors’ tax, which is permitted by the government. The problem? While the U.S. and E.U. nations have a body of familiar regulations in place to govern intellectual property rights between independent contractors and their clients, Ukraine’s are far more patchy in the area of transfer of intellectual property rights. “There are a lot of ways for companies to lose money here,” said Mr. Sheliakin. Intellectual property rights are especially important in service industries like IT. Without legislation, an IT contractor could create a spin-off company after closing a deal with a client -- even if they’d been paid to develop an exclusive product. At present, said Sheliakin, some companies, like Ciklum, find ways—usually after extensive consultation—to frame contracts and navigate Ukraine’s legislation. For now, Ciklum’s might be the best approach, he said—besides moving company headquarters abroad. “I don’t see [this legislation] as being ready in a year or two,” Sheliakin said.     Sourse: http://www.theubj.com/news/view/ukraines-it-industry-could-near-10-billion-by-2025

"Finnish NEFCO company to develop green projects in Ukraine"

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"Ukraine boosts sugar exports by almost 60%"

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6 December, 2017

"United States helps Ukraine discover more than $3 bln stolen public funds"

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"Ukraine, China sign program of investment cooperation in agricultural sector"

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5 December, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook A Ukrainian House in New York's East Village I met last week in NYC with my friends and colleagues Mariya Soroka, Ivan Chaika and Alex Gorbachov to discuss a “Ukrainian House” community / co-working space concept for New York’s East Village. The East Village – where I was born and raised - has since the 19 Century been a neighborhood of immigrants (German, Jewish, Polish and Ukrainian). For a fascinating history of the neighborhood and a neighborhood Landmark I encourage you to read an article in 6sqft is published by CityRealty titled “Jewish gangsters, jazz legends, and Joy Division: The evolution of the Ukrainian National Home.” https://www.6sqft.com/jewish-gangsters-jazz-legends-and-joy-division-the-evolution-of-the-ukrainian-national-home/ Another recent article in the New York Times titled “With Closing of East Village Shop, Little Ukraine Grows Smaller” tells an important story about the history of the neighborhood as well as its character today. https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/06/nyregion/with-closing-of-east-village-shop-little-ukraine-grows-smaller.html As the title suggests, the East Village is looking less and less like “Little Ukraine” with each passing year. That said, a new generation of young Ukrainian-Americans and Ukrainian-American organizations like Razom for Ukraine and stepping into the neighborhood and revitalizing the community and building on the legacy that my mother, grandparents and their respective generations built on New York’s East side. “Ukrainian House” (a working name) is envisioned as both an institution firmly rooted in New York but also as a bridge to contemporary Ukraine and Ukrainians, in particular to the thriving civic and startup communities bubbling with activity in Ukraine among Ukrainians that are – for the most part - under 40. Although “Ukrainian House” is not formally a UGTI project, as a native son of the East Village and Ukrainian-American committed to building a better future for Ukraine and Ukrainians I will lend my time and energy to helping ensure that this project becomes both a reality and a success. Stay tuned for updates!

"Ukraine, China implementing some joint projects for $7 bln"

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"Parliament ratifies investment agreement between Ukraine and OPEC Fund"

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4 December, 2017

"Ukraine intends to extend govt securities, raise domestic borrowings"

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"The Ukrainian Central Bank Is Expanding Its Blockchain Team"

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2 December, 2017

"Ukraine harmonizing legal framework in export control with EU norms"

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"It’s quite possible to achieve 5% GDP growth next year - PM Groysman"

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1 December, 2017

"China can invest $8-12 bln in Ukraine within five years - MP"

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"Renewable energy generation capacity of 300 MW to be installed in 2017"

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30 November, 2017
BORYS HUMENIUK Ambassador of Ukraine to the Republic of Cyprus UGTI on Facebook Priorities for Ukraine: European Union integration IN 2017, Ukraine has continued to implement structural reforms, generating positive trends in the economic and social sphere despite internal and external challenges. The illegal annexation of Crimea and Sevastopol by the Russian Federation and the conflict in the east of the country provoked by Russia’s destabilising actions have continued to pose significant challenges to Ukraine’s reform process from a political and economic perspective, in addition to causing significant human suffering. Ukraine has continued actively to seek peaceful legal and political solutions in this area. Considerable legislative reforms have taken place in the fight against corruption and new specialised anti-corruption institutions have been set up in Ukraine. Work on implementation of anti-corruption efforts continued over the past year, while further substantial work is still outstanding. Some of the new Ukrainian agencies already participate actively in the fight against corruption, while others remain to be fully operationalised. Ensuring sustainable and tangible changes in the governance system to eliminate corruption opportunities and ensure proper prosecution and punishment for corruption-related crimes remains one of the key challenges Ukraine faces in its reform process hindering the improvement of the business and investment climate. With full entry into force of the Association Agreement and introduction of visa-free travel, Ukraine and the European Union had reached qualitatively new ambitious level. A new political and contractual reality establishes proper conditions for elaboration of a new forward-looking strategic agenda, which will foster further transformations in Ukraine towards the best European standards and practices. The President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko put forward five new strategic long-term goals on the road of Ukraine’s European integration: association of Ukraine with the Schengen Area; integration into EU Customs Union; integration into EU Energy Union; integration into EU Single Digital Market; and entry into EU Common Aviation Area. Implementation of these initiatives is in the interest of both Ukraine and the European Union. The Bulgarian presidency of the EU Council as an EU Member State from the Central-Eastern Europe and the Black Sea region has a unique opportunity and advantage to bring new impetus to the developments in the region. With a view towards the Bulgarian presidency being a success story, Ukraine has elaborated short-term priorities of its relations with the EU. We rely on Bulgarian leadership in the EU Council and EU member-states, including the Republic of Cyprus, to facilitate their effective implementation. Particularly, we urgently need further international support for Ukraine in the context of ongoing Russian aggression. This kind of support could be provided by upholding EU’s personal and economic sanctions against Russia until full restoration of sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine, regularly updating the sanctions list of persons and entities responsible for the violation of territorial integrity and sovereignty of Ukraine over Crimea, preventing bypassing of the restrictive measures by the EU economic operators, as well as illegal visits to the occupied territories of Crimea and Sevastopol by EU citizens, organisations and companies, blocking any attempts of Russia to legitimize the occupation of Crimea and city of Sevastopol in the framework of international agreements and launching the UN peacekeeping operation in the occupied territories in the Donbas in accordance with the UN peacekeeping principles in coordination and by agreement with Ukraine, and pressing Russia to release immediately Ukrainian political prisoners and hostages while establishing an international Group of Friends of Ukraine for de-occupation of Crimea and at the same time intensifying efforts to counter Russian propaganda. In the field of trade and economy Ukraine needs much support in implementation of DCFTA commitments between Ukraine and the EU, establishment of new financial instruments to enhance AA/DCFTA implementation and to boost domestic and foreign investments to Ukraine, continuation of EU-Ukraine High Level Industrial Dialogue in order to accelerate approximation of EU rules for industrial technical regulations and standards, with the view to forge closer links between European and Ukrainian industrial sectors, promoting Ukraine’s participation in the EU Digital Single Market, establishment of export promotion agency, Support Ukraine-EU dialogue on accelerated liberalisation of trade in services in the DCFTA framework, focusing on a several priority sectors. We need further financial assistance as well, particularly by ensuring due level of Ukraine’s participation in the EU’s initiative on the External Investment Plan aimed at providing assistance to the EU Neighbourhood, revising the EIB External Lending Mandate for Ukraine including for rehabilitation of Donbas and with regard to lending to sub-sovereign borrowers, ensuring EU’s financial and humanitarian assistance to the population in the Donbas, and supporting establishment of a European Investment Plan for Ukraine based on the best practices of multi-donor instruments. The investors/donors’ international conference for Ukraine in Brussels in 2018 will be a great support to this end. Despite the continuing conflict in its East, Ukraine has demonstrated unprecedented levels of resilience and persistence in achieving societal change, asserting its European orientation. Expectations regarding the EU remain high. Civil society continues to play a pivotal role in the country’s reform progress, counterbalancing strong vested interests still represented in parliament and among institutions and authorities. With the entry into force of the AA/DCFTA and visa liberalisation, EU-Ukraine relations have never been so intense. In order to attract the investment necessary for sustainable economic development and for an improvement in standards of living across the country, including for the most vulnerable segments of the population, the authorities are being urged by civil society and international partners to redouble their efforts in the pursuit of meaningful reform, intensifying in particular the fight against corruption at all levels. The EU is consolidating its political, technical and financial support, with clear conditionality. In 2018, Ukraine will continue to undertake political and economic reforms in numerous key sectors, in the context of its political association and economic integration with the EU. It will also continue to address significant macroeconomic imbalances. Through policy dialogue and financial assistance the EU, during the Bulgarian presidency of the EU Council, in collaboration with international partners, has to proceed with supporting measures aiming at improved governance, the fight against corruption, judiciary reform, public administration reform and decentralisation. And without any doubt, continuous emphasis has to be placed on support for the implementation of the Association Agreement.     Sourse: http://cyprus-mail.com/2017/11/25/priorities-ukraine-european-union-integration/

"Finland’s foreign ministry, NEFCO setting up fund for financing renewable energy in Ukraine by EUR 6 mln"

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"British parliamentarians start visit to Ukraine"

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29 November, 2017

"Electric car sales in Ukraine increase 3.2-fold in Jan-Oct"

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"II Ukrainian Renewable Energy Forum to kick off in Kyiv tomorrow"

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28 November, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine & the world needs blockchain technology I am sure by now everyone heard all the hype about Bitcoin. Yesterday it reached $10,000. But not everyone aware the Bitcoin is based on the blockchain technology. It is my view, as important as crypto currencies might become, the long term play is an opportunity blockchain technology provides. For countries like Ukraine and many other developing economies, if operations of the government and business is conducted on blockchain it creates transparency and drastically reduces corruption at all levels. It improves investor’s trust and confidence to put their hard earned money to work. Further, properly structured, SMART tokens give inventors and business owners an opportunity to reduce risks, reduce operating expenses and at the same time provide liquidity for both. The future of the earth, civilization and all its assets belong to an individual human. The humanity was given a key in the form of Blockchain technology to change the way we live today and to harmonize human relationships around the world. We believe Suntri ( full disclosure: I recently become CEO of the United States based company) is a solution and the way to create decentralized globalization platform with decision power at individual level anywhere in the world. Blockchain will give power back to an individual in a truly democratized way to empower an individual. It is a new global operating system based on principals of decentralized operations at all levels of governance and management. The new global democracy will be based on collective decisions of parties interested in a subject. Suntri is created to facilitate the transformation process. • Blockchain technology will transform all sectors of the global economy; • Blockchain technology will move governments and corporations from the centralized system to the decentralized system of governance; • Blockchain technology will make corruption a thing of the past; • Blockchain technology will eliminate need of a “middle man” in most industries reducing the cost of all operations; • Blockchain technology will give an access of low cost capital to every corner of the world and to any individual; • Blockchain technology will allow freedom to invest Ukraine is already one of the global leaders in blockchain. It can give country an opportunity to export it’s know how and solutions, but it also will facilitate in attracting Foreign Direct Investment in the country. Our team is working on several very exciting projects for Ukraine in this space. Stay tuned.

"Japan simplifies visa regime for Ukrainians from 2018 – pm Abe"

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"Ukraine, China approve updated bilateral program of space cooperation until 2020"

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27 November, 2017

"Capital investments in Ukraine grew 20.7% in January-September 2017"

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"Australian Ukrainians welcome Australia’s foreign policy White Paper"

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25 November, 2017

"Cyber attacks, hybrid war biggest threats for EaP countries"

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"About EUR 750 mln invested in development of renewable energy sources in Ukraine over past three years"

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24 November, 2017

"Ukrainian IT company among 500 world's largest software manufacturers"

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"Ukraine’s National Police, Microsoft sign cybersecurity agreement"

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23 November, 2017
DONALD N. JENSEN Senior Adjunct Fellow at the Center for European Policy Analysis UGTI on Facebook ARE UKRAINE’S REFORMS REVERSIBLE? Many people — especially in Russia — have long accepted a narrative about Ukrainian history and society that is largely false, distorted or simplified: that Ukraine was merely an offshoot of Russia, that Russia is the principal successor of the great East Slavic state of medieval Kyivan Rus, and that Ukraine was a backward, unsophisticated province of the great Russian (and Soviet) empires without a true language or culture of its own. Indeed, Russian President Vladimir Putin has stated several times that he believed Ukraine was not even a real country. Since the 2014 Maidan Revolution, moreover, the Kremlin has concocted a propaganda mishmash to rationalize its shock that Ukraine — though closely related to Russia in some ways — is a state that wants to shape its own future independent of Moscow. Russian officials and the Kremlin propaganda machine thus have claimed that the Kyiv government is dominated by fascists, that anti-Semitism is rampant, and that ethnic Russians in eastern Ukraine are victims of discrimination. Little of this is true. In fact, Moscow’s efforts — especially its bloody military invasion — to hold Ukraine close against its will have backfired and driven Ukraine more quickly toward the West. “The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people,” John Adams wrote to a friend in 1818 of the American war for independence. The United States and Ukraine are vastly different, but a comparable transformation of popular attitudes appears to have taken place among Ukrainians since the Maidan. More than 90 percent of Ukraine’s inhabitants now consider themselves ethnic Ukrainians, and only 5.5 percent Russians, found a recent poll conducted by the Gorshenin Institute. In addition, 84.6 percent of those living in eastern Ukraine consider themselves Ukrainian. Since the Maidan, Ukraine’s national identity has come to include a strong anti-Russian animus. In an April 2017 public opinion survey by Rating Group Ukraine, 57 percent of Ukrainians expressed a very cold or cold attitude toward Russia, while only 17 percent expressed a very warm or warm attitude. As anti-Russian sentiment has grown, so has the West’s appeal. The European Union, with its allure of economic prosperity and functioning democracy, has long attracted the interest of a sizeable portion of the Ukrainian population. The last three years have also witnessed growing Ukrainian public support for joining NATO. While the EU offers proximity, the Ukrainian government and many Ukrainians see the United States as Kyiv’s primary security partner. What do these changes in attitude mean for Ukrainian reform? An outstanding report by the distinguished Chatham House think tank takes note of Ukraine’s fight for survival as an independent and viable state. It finds that much of what Ukraine has achieved is susceptible to reversal, and that underlying political conditions are “far from healthy.” Ukraine’s “core security objectives,” the report argues, depend on national cohesion, wise allocation of resources, and a long-term commitment by state and society alike. The more pluralistic, Western-oriented values of much of society — but by no means all of it — will likely ensure that there will be no literal reversion to the past. Ukraine is unlikely to move back into Moscow’s orbit. But the problems outlined by the Chatham House report remain, and mean the struggle for reform will probably take new forms — in increased tensions between an active civil society and often corrupt political and economic elites, and in the fight against corruption. Rather than increase its military involvement in the Donbas, Moscow is likely to try to exploit strains in Ukrainian society by stepping up its meddling in Ukrainian politics. In recent months, Ukraine’s intelligence service has identified a center in Kharkiv — an internet storefront — that plans and finances Russian activities. Russian-sponsored gangs vandalize Polish or Hungarian monuments so that Ukrainians are blamed or they, alternatively, vandalize Ukrainian monuments so that Poles are blamed. They also damage synagogues and pit groups against one another. They recently defaced a poster of Pope John Paul II with “anti-Polish slogans.” Vandals who are arrested have often been directly linked to parties or companies still controlled by Ukraine’s deposed dictator, Viktor Yanukovych. Such methods are less brutal than large-scale military intervention, but reflect no less accurately the Kremlin’s continued commitment to denying Ukraine the future favored by most of its citizens.     Sourse: http://infowar.cepa.org/EN/Are-Ukraines-reforms-reversible

"President of Ukraine signs judicial reform"

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"Ukraine agrees with UAE on joint aircraft production"

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22 November, 2017

"Projected growth of production in Aerospace industry in Ukraine estimated at 30% in 2017 – SSAU"

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"Ukraine saves over 7 bln cu m of gas thanks to alternative sources"

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21 November, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Co-founder Update UGTI has developed a clear opportunity pipeline and is focused on closing a number of strategically critical projects during the first half of 2018. During the holiday lull, my personal focus will be on raising awareness in the United States of the critical importance to Ukraine and to the national strategic interests of the United States of the proper implementation of an independent anti-corruption court in Ukraine. Together with colleagues in New York and Ukraine we made interesting progress on this front today and look forward to providing a substantive update on this effort soon. Слава Україні!

"Ukraine raises export of electricity by almost 1.4 times in ten months"

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"Ukraine up from 84th to 43rd position in Taxation rating over year "

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20 November, 2017

"Space industries of Ukraine and Canada have potential for cooperation"

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"U.S. National Security Council approves $47 mln grant on weapons for Ukraine - ABC"

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18 November, 2017

"Stoltenberg: NATO doors opened for Ukraine"

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"Cybersecurity: Barely perceptible threat has potential to derail Canada's economy"

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17 November, 2017

"U.S. Senate approves defense budget with lethal weapons for Ukraine"

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"Ambassador Du Wei: Silk Road to strengthen Ukraine-China relations"

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16 November, 2017

"Hahn says EU ready to continue helping Ukraine implement reforms"

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"Ukraine, China may cooperate in production of electric vehicles"

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15 November, 2017

"World Bank impressed with reform process in Ukraine"

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"HarvEast seeks to double investment in 2018"

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14 November, 2017
DAR'YA ANASTASʹYEVA Chief Editor at AgroReview UGTI on Facebook Blockchain - Chinese wall of information security Within the framework of the 2nd Annual AgroIT Conference, we had a conversation with SuntriBlockChain Operation System’s founders, Henry Shterenberg and Roman Nazarov, then we tried to figure out how much Ukraine is willing to change its approach to information policy and why farmers need blockchain. Blockchain is a distributed database. Any technology has a server, and if there is one server, even with a few keys, the access is available to several people. They can change the data if they want to, or if they aree forced to. Also, there are hacking attacks directed straight to the server, causing damage to companies. Blockchain, which brings together a huge number of servers, displays the changes made on all servers at once, while changing any number or letter in one of the databases. Consequently, it is impossible to spoil the data or enter them incorrectly unnoticed. Blockchain eliminates corruption at all levels. Hacker attacks are played on a specific server, there are hundreds of them in blockchain, so the data that it contains are saved. Cybersecurity is one of the most important tasks facing the whole world and Ukraine in particular. Today our country, considering the war with Russia, is becoming one of the main players in the field of cybersecurity, but unfortunately, work in this area is not serious enough. Our company is actively working in this direction; we are in the process of creating "Ukrainian Dream" Cybersecurity Center for Ukraine in the Silicon Valley. The main project, which is currently being developed by SuntriBlockChain Operation System is the land platform. There is a lot of hype around Blockchain technology because of Cryptocurrencies (most of which, by the way, will soon cease to exist at all, and the rest will be used completely differently). The most important progress of the economy and business in the global context will be the monetization of land without its sale. Investors from all over the world will be able to enter our cooperative model and buy land. Due to to the creation of a corporate model today, the cost per hectare of land has decreased. Blockchain enables each farmer (no matter, he has 10,000 or 2 hectares) to monetize what he has. Investors are buying tokens in a cooperative for every hectare of land without buying land physically. Thus, as a result, they increase the price of a token by raising the value of land and dividends from the products that the land provides. What a farmer receives in this case are: less amount of expenses, better technology, regardless of the culture of cultivation and as a result - increased productivity. And when the productivity increases - the price of land increases. The cooperative attracts the best technologies - from organic fertilizers that clean the earth, to the satellite images that allow to keep track of the land and harvest from above and see the entire picture. Ukraine is one of the leaders in blockchain technologies. Our project "Ukrainian Dream" has united in cooperation the Academy of Sciences, state and business of Ukraine for the first time during the years of independence. In addition, the Prime Minister Mr.Groysman announced the transition of the State Land Cadastre to the blockchain technology. According to Henry Shterenberg, this technology is capable of changing the world, as it will eliminate the existence of a credit system, banks, notarial services, etc. The main difficulties encountered by the blockchain lobbyists are the lack of specialists and the unwillingness of businesses to actively adopt and implement something new.     Sourse: https://agroreview.com/news/blokchejn---kytajska-stina-informacijnoyi-bezpeky

"Disinformation in social networks influenced elections in 18 countries - Freedom House"

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"Kuwait interested in AN-178 aircraft - National Security and Defense Council"

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13 November, 2017

"U.S. successfully launches Antares rocket designed by Ukraine"

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"World Bank Group President starts visit to Ukraine"

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11 November, 2017

"Ukrainian-made An-132D transport aircraft showcased at Dubai Air Show "

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"S&P affirms 'B-/B' ratings on Ukraine with stable outlook"

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10 November, 2017

"World Bank Group President to visit Ukraine"

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"Ukraine, Japan have good prospects for developing relations - Poroshenko"

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9 November, 2017

"U.S. Congress approves defense budget of $350 mln for Ukraine"

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"Canada eases visa requirements for Ukrainians"

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8 November, 2017

"EBRD confirms stable growth of Ukraine's GDP"

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"IMF expert group to visit Kyiv for technical discussion of draft budget 2018"

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7 November, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Anti-corruption Court As a Ukrainian-American committed to help build a better future for Ukraine and Ukrainians and working to promote investment in and trade with Ukraine, I believe without reservation that the struggle against corruption and the entrenched status quo struggle presents no less formidable an obstacle to delivering on the promise of Maidan than Ukraine's war with Russia. Countries Ukraine might emulate to guide reforms are anchored by a common understanding of social and business norms enforced by the rule of law. Equally significant, multinational Western corporations and investment houses dominate the internal economy of each Western “first world” country and control the largest proportion of trade among them. Ukraine cannot join the West as an exception to this rule, because the desired outcome necessarily springs from a sharing in Western norms and the legal framework for enforcing them. With the patience of its citizens running thin and with Western resolve less steadfast than the Kremlin’s, a necessary condition for current leadership in Ukraine to deliver on the demands of Maidan, deter Russia, and protect Ukraine against future aggression is for Western and Ukrainian governments (and business interests) to work in a concerted, coordinated manner to drastically and expediently increase the presence of Western multinationals and investment houses in Ukraine to break its dependence on local oligarchs and thereby speed the “Westernization” of its economy. In this context, implementing a transparent and independent anti-corruption court is the most important issue in Ukraine today. Ukrainians, both at home and abroad, as well as western partners of Ukraine must campaign against endemic corruption and other lingering hallmarks of the economic and political status quo in Ukraine in the same breath and with equal vigor as their armed forces fight in the Donbas.

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ROSTYSLAV AVERCHUK Guest editor VoxUkraine UGTI on Facebook Ukraine: Reforming a Country in War is Difficult, but There Is No Other Way The recent opinion article on EUobserver, “West Needs to Get Real on Ukraine”, calls upon the West and supporters of reforms in Ukraine to realize how difficult it is to implement changes while fighting off Russia’s aggression and suggests that they should decrease the pressure on the Ukrainian government. The authors argue that it is necessary to put off major reforms because they divert valuable resources, generate instability and undermine national unity. At first glance, some of the arguments may seem to be convincing. Yet the reasoning behind the key arguments is not persuasive. The article “West needs to get real on Ukraine” by Roman Sohn and Ariana Gic considers the expectations about reforms in Ukraine in the context of Russia’s aggression. The authors rightly note that the demand that Ukraine carries out reforms does not free the West from the necessity to resolutely oppose Russia. They are also right to argue that the Government bears the full burden of political responsibility; hence one should recognize its achievements and be objective when criticizing it. Other points, however, are much more controversial. The authors argue that Ukraine needs to mobilize all of its resources to win the war and should thus put resource-intensive and destabilizing reforms on hold. The article calls upon the West to abandon unrealistic expectations about the progress of reforms in Ukraine, recognize the priority of its right to defend itself, and let Ukrainian society determine the balance and pace of the reforms. The lobbyists of reforms should focus on promoting the demand for change among the population.   Mobilise all resources to win the war before turning attention to reforms?   As the authors write, Ukraine confronts a much stronger opponent. Russia has an interest and ability to wage a hybrid war for quite some time. Even if Ukraine does mobilize all of its resources, will it be able to end this conflict – and if so, when and at what cost will this happen? Ukraine lacks the resources to win a decisive victory whereas a gradual build-up of armaments at the country’s own expense will not be enough to stop the simmering conflict. One should thus not expect the conflict to end soon. Therefore, all the ways to enhance the country’s ability to withstand Russia’s pressure over a long period constitute an effective use of resources. It is right though that a balance must be found between maintaining defence capabilities in the short run and the accumulation of resources in the medium run. Besides, putting the economy on a war footing would provoke a socio-economic instability at least equal to one that, the authors fear, is created by reforms. The authors also emphasize that significant changes should be clearly validated by the people. Yet to what extent is the society willing to support the full mobilization of resources for military purposes? Recent reports about the embezzlement by high-ranking officials at the Defense Ministry do not help here. As long as the level of perception of corruption remains high, doubts as to the real use of funds will linger. Apart from corruption, the weakness of the Ukrainian state, and hence of the army, arguably results from the low efficiency of the use of available resources. Reforms, which are long overdue, could improve the situation. The authors believe that liberal Western institutions are equally unable to fend off Russia’s attacks. In their opinion, this shows that pro-Western reforms will not enhance Ukraine’s ability to resist Russia’s aggression. However, this comparison is hardly convincing. Western institutions were not created to withstand Russia, yet there is no doubt that they can be more effective than their unreformed analogues. Moreover, it remains unclear what the actual impact of Russia’s interference in the internal affairs of Western countries is, especially compared with its interference in Ukraine.   Reforms scatter the country’s resources?   Reforms do not necessarily consume valuable internal resources. Some reforms are already being financed by the West. For example, the EU is committed to providing €100 mln to fund the public administration reform. Other reforms, such as the reform of inefficient state enterprises, are not prohibitively expensive yet can play a crucial role in balancing public finances, reducing corruption risks, attracting foreign investment etc. Any difficulties here are mostly of political nature. Moreover, the state has also been carrying out a number of reforms without any pressure from the West, even though they require considerable expenses, e.g. the education reform. Therefore, if reforms are high on the priority list, resources can be found.   The expectations of the West are utopian and its pressure excessive?   Western governments and organizations provide a balanced assessment of the progress of reforms in Ukraine. Francis Malige, EBRD’s Managing Director, says that Ukraine’s reform successes have exceeded his expectations. David Lipton, First Deputy Managing Director of the IMF, also emphasizes Ukraine’s achievements in macroeconomic stabilization, banking sector reform, innovative decisions in public procurement, etc. One can thus hardly say that the West has utopian expectations or that it underestimates Ukraine’s achievements. It may be rather tempting instead to accuse Ukraine’s government of encouraging utopian expectations. For instance, a number of extremely optimistic goals in President Poroshenko’s Strategy 2020 were not imposed by any Western government, international organization, or Ukrainian NGO. On the other hand, it reflects the aspiration of the Ukrainian people for change. The West does exert pressure on Ukraine’s government. Still, according to the publicly available information, the interaction between Ukraine and e.g., the IMF, hardly resembles blackmail. The negotiations are ongoing and the IMF is well aware of the difficulties and political nuances that major reforms entail. Deadlines are often postponed. For example, the IMF understands that the opposition to lifting the ban on land sales in Ukraine is currently too strong. In the words of David Lipton, “What was agreed is that more time is needed to get the right decision on this important topic.” The authors rightly point out that the West needs to deal more resolutely with Russia’s aggression. They are not alone in thinking so. Chatham House’s experts argue that the West can and should do more to dissuade Russia from continuing its hostilities against Ukraine. However, they also believe that one of the ways to do this is to ensure the continuity and depth of reforms in Ukraine: to that end, it is necessary both to give more support to Ukraine and to make sure that it undertakes real, not cosmetic, reforms. It is also worth remembering that the West is not a monolithic entity. Facing the pressure from populists in a still complicated economic settings, governments in the EU countries have to to convince voters that their support for Ukraine is important. If reforms in Ukraine are successful, the population of other European countries will more readily agree to assisting Ukraine, which will make a favorable resolution of the conflict with Russia more likely.   Lead and innovate instead of repeating and copying?   As the authors remark, Ukraine’s resources, including human ones, are limited. Given the pressure from Russia and criticism from the populists, this does not leave much room for experiments. Hence the safest bet for Ukraine is to employ the recipes that other countries (not necessarily EU members) have successfully tested. Besides, innovation is always possible as the required changes are so massive while the settings are inevitably unique. Moreover, the IMF does not insist on implementing any specific model of reform. Its main message to Ukraine is not to postpone changes. For example, Mr Lipton says the following about the land reform, “The reform can be done in different ways, and there are different models and examples from different countries. What’s important is that there is land reform rather than no land reform.” Ukraine can thus offer various ways to reform itself to Western donors.   The balance of reforms should be determined by the people rather than by non-accountable NGOs or the West?   The Ukrainian people hardly exert effective and systematic influence on public policy. While hoping for a change for the better, the majority of the population remains politically passive. Most media outlets are dependent. Main political parties are based on personalities and interpersonal arrangements rather than on ideas and specific programs. It will take years for the status quo to change even if relevant political reforms are implemented. In these settings, NGOs is a channel through which the society can influence politicians – by means of pooling the country’s intellectual resources, creating alternatives for public policy, and controlling the authorities. Yet the authors clearly exaggerate this influence when they warn that no reformist NGO should have a monopoly over the reform agenda. At the same time, some of the authors’ comments are fair. NGOs have to ensure their transparency and work more actively with the population. However, politicians do not merely translate the public opinion into political decisions. Voters sometimes provide general guidelines, transferring the right to make decisions to politicians and expecting that the latter will improve public welfare. Linking each and every issue to the public opinion is tantamount to escaping from responsibility. If politicians always take the public opinion as an excuse, a good moment for change may never arrive. Influencing the public opinion through discussion and informing sometimes becomes part of a reform. It is complicated yet feasible. And here the state is much more powerful than reformist NGOs, which, the authors think, should focus on building public support for the reforms. In Mr Lipton’s words, “Ukraine must and can find a way for a public debate and consensus to get past rejection, shelving and blocking the reform. Again, it’s important to act rather than not act.” The authors caution Ukraine against turning into a client state of the West. Yet in the absence of reforms Ukraine will inevitably have to seek outside support over and over again. In Ukraine’s history, reforms have been much slower and less decisive than necessary. There is a risk that some of the much-needed reforms will be shelved again, as it happened after the Orange Revolution. When the society does not have sufficient influence on political decision-making, external stimuli can be decisive. For instance, it was the prospect of the visa-free regime with the EU that motivated Ukraine’s parliament to pass important anti-corruption measures. The reliance on Western aid can actually serve as a lever that frees the reformist politicians from the pressure of special interest groups.   The changes should be carefully crafted and implemented, so as to maintain government stability and national unity?   Sometimes, politicians should have the courage to take the steps that may seem unpopular. This would not necessarily lead to losing power. The failure to act may have even worse consequences. After all, no relation has been foundbetween reform and government instability. Economic performance is much more important. In fact, it is passivity and lack of reforms that eventually leads to economic downturn and to socio-economic instability. Besides, in Ukraine, opposition parties are likely to find many reasons for criticising the government anyway, given the strain that the conflict has put on the country’s economy and other long-standing problems. All the mentions of the “window of opportunities” is not just empty talk. Reforms, especially so massive, are more likely to succeed when implemented quickly. If one keeps insisting on a gradual approach, reform may not happen at all. Even necessary changes add to the public fatigue, prompt the opponents to organize, and threaten the unity within the government.   Conclusion   Russia’s aggression aims to weaken Ukraine, prevent it from succeeding, keep it isolated and under Russian control. This war is unlikely to be won exclusively by military means and will probably continue for quite some time in one form or another. Ukraine needs reforms to become stronger. The pressure of the West can help to circumvent the opposition of special interest groups, yet leaves much room for initiative and dialogue in Ukraine. Shelving the reforms because of the military conflict would ultimately play into the hands of Russia.     Sourse: https://voxukraine.org/2017/10/27/ukraine-reforming-a-country-in-war-is-difficult-but-there-is-no-other-way/

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NOLAN PETERSON The Daily Signal’s foreign correspondent based in Ukraine UGTI on Facebook Russia Field-Tested Hybrid Warfare in Ukraine. Why That Cyberthreat Matters for US KYIV, Ukraine—Since 2014 Russia has used Ukraine as a testing ground for its hybrid warfare doctrine, underscoring what some security experts say is a case study for the new kinds of security threats the U.S. and its Western allies can anticipate from Moscow. “The threats Ukraine faces are harbingers of things to come for the U.S. and its other allies,” said Junaid Islam, chief technology officer and president of Vidder, a California-based cybersecurity firm that does work in Ukraine. “It is in the national strategic interests of both the United States and Ukraine to cooperate deeply in cybersecurity because Ukraine is a canary in the cyberspace coal mine,” Islam told The Daily Signal. A top Ukrainian security official recently disclosed a cyberwarfare tactic honed by Russia in Ukraine, which could be a bellwether for Russia’s next act of political warfare against the U.S. The Ukrainian government recently has been attacked by “undetectable” computer viruses that target “particular individuals, in particular departments, and they’re constructed based on the social understanding of social media by particular people,” Dmytro Shymkiv, deputy head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine on Administrative, Social and Economic Reform, explained this month during the Future in Review conference in Park City, Utah. “Russia recruits psychiatrists, scientists, and neurologists, who construct these things to target particular individuals,” Shymkiv said. According to Ukrainian security officials, Russian agents build a psychological profile of their mark through his or her social media footprint. Then, using that information, the Russians can make personalized computer viruses, or run a social media influence operation specifically crafted with that one particular person in mind. “People say, ‘Well, that’s a science fiction.’ It’s not,” Shymkiv said. “When the annexation of Crimea took place, [Russia] shut down the internet to Ukraine, and they used social media to influence people’s behavior. And you can influence people’s behavior. You do it in a nice way, posting things to their friends, et cetera. There’s a whole factory in Russia doing this.” This is known in the cybersecurity world as “social engineering”—a form of cyberattack in which people are psychologically manipulated into performing actions or divulging confidential information. According to some security experts, the best defense against this kind of threat is education. “Man is the weakest link in the chain of information technology,” Mykhailo Vasyanovich, head of the Public Council for the Ministry of Information Policy of Ukraine, told The Daily Signal. “With such cyberattacks, which are now taking place in Ukraine, it is necessary to raise the level of information technology literacy of users by conducting educational work on cybersecurity among employees of private and state enterprises,” Vasyanovich said. Some experts worry this reliance on the security savvy of internet users to fend off Russian cyberattacks might be a vulnerability for the U.S. “What may especially worry the U.S. is that Russia targets influential individuals, such as journalists or political analysts, especially those of rather skeptical approach toward Moscow,” Daniel Szeligowski, senior research fellow on Ukraine for the Polish Institute of International Affairs, told The Daily Signal. “Unlike institutions or infrastructure, they don’t have state protection and are thus vulnerable to intimidation and blackmailing,” Szeligowski added. “And given the rising popularity of social media, such a threat is even more widespread.” Hybrid War Russia’s hybrid attacks against Ukraine have included, but are not limited to: • Using social media to shape public opinion among an adversary’s population. • Turning commercially available computer software into a tool for espionage and cyberwarfare. • Exploiting smartphones to spy on and wage psychological warfare against an adversary’s military forces. • Using cyberattacks to undermine an adversary’s electoral process. • Using pseudo-news reports to push a propaganda line that sows division within an adversary’s national culture. All of these tactics have also been used by Russia against the U.S. since Russo-American relations took a nosedive in the fallout over Russia’s military aggression against Ukraine in early 2014. “Ukraine is a perfect testing ground for hybrid warfare,” Szeligowski said. “Thus, it is no wonder that Russia has already seized the opportunity, and in Ukraine it has made a dry run of all sorts of its offensive techniques.” Russian hybrid warfare is not covert warfare. Rather, it’s the combined use of conventional military force with other means such as cyberattacks and propaganda to sow chaos and confusion—both on the battlefield and deep behind the front lines. Hybrid warfare is an evolving threat spanning every combat domain. Particularly, hybrid warfare weaponizes many pieces of everyday life, including smartphones, social media networks, commercially available computer software, and journalism. “Russia is testing in Ukraine both procedures and concepts, which later on are being applied in the West—such as during the U.S. and French elections,” a Polish security official told The Daily Signal on background, asking not to be named due to professional restrictions on speaking to the media. “In short, Ukraine remains for Russia a crucial hybrid warfare battleground and testbed,” the security official said. “The Russian hybrid warfare model is being further developed, perfected, and tested as we speak. Russia’s ability to escalate rapidly across the whole spectrum of conflict makes the West prone to the ‘surprise effect.’” Russia’s use of social media and cyberattacks as weapons of war might be innovative, but, at its core, it’s a modern revamp of a Cold War-era idea. Hybrid warfare is the Kremlin’s contemporary take on a Soviet military doctrine called “deep battle,” in which front-line combat operations are supported with operations to spread chaos and confusion deep within the enemy’s country. Hybrid warfare also draws on the Soviet Union’s well-documented history of “influence operations” against the U.S. and other Western allies. In effect, Russia’s overall strategy to undermine the West hasn’t changed all that much from the Soviet Union’s playbook. But the world in which those Soviet theories are now put into practice is a radically different one than during the Cold War. The advent of the internet, and social media in particular, has given the Kremlin direct access to the populations of its adversaries—bypassing the gatekeeper role America’s media institutions used to play. “Everything today is digitized, including phone and mail services, and everything runs on the same network,” Kenneth Geers, ambassador of NATO’s cybersecurity center and a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, told The Daily Signal. “There is only one internet, and one cyberspace, inhabited by all of the world’s citizens, soldiers, spies, and statesmen.” Meanwhile, Americans’ distrust in their media institutions has reached historic levels. Russia has stealthily taken advantage of Americans’ crisis of confidence in the media to permeate the U.S. news cycle with misinformation spread by propaganda mouthpieces cloaked as alternative news sources, such as RT and Sputnik. Lessons Learned Some commercial cybersecurity firms have stepped in both to harden Ukraine’s cyberdefenses and use lessons learned from Ukraine to craft better defenses for the U.S. to counter Russia. “With the world increasingly digital and connected, Ukraine is of strategic, vital interest to the West,” said Greg Ness, a cybersecurity specialist and vice president of marketing at Vidder. “What happens in Ukraine doesn’t stay in Ukraine.” California-based Vidder has put together a team of cybersecurity experts to comprise the core of a proposed U.S.-Ukraine cybersecurity center with offices in Kyiv, Washington, and Silicon Valley. “By ensuring that Ukraine adopts leading cybersecurity solutions and best practices, we will not only provide Ukraine with the best protection from cyberattacks, but it also helps U.S. experts develop new and more effective technologies and strategies in the future,” Islam, Vidder’s president, told The Daily Signal. “It will also help establish Ukraine as a secure, stable, prosperous, and reliable ally in Eastern Europe.” The war in Ukraine has shaped how NATO forces are training for the next military conflict. On Thursday, NATO and Ukraine launched a joint center to counter hybrid warfare. The center is part of the Comprehensive Assistance Package that NATO pledged to Ukraine during the alliance’s summit in Warsaw last year. According to NATO, the joint center will be “a platform for identifying lessons learned from hybrid war in Ukraine.” For its part, the U.S. military has reportedly been studying the war in Ukraine to shape its own military doctrine. Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster, the Trump administration’s national security adviser, recently directed a study to analyze Russia’s hybrid warfare tactics in Ukraine in order to craft recommendations for the U.S. Army. Szeligowski added, however, that not all of Russia’s hybrid warfare tactics in Ukraine would be effective against the U.S. “There is a yawning gap between Ukrainian and American cyber capabilities, not to mention cultural and linguistic differences between Russians and Americans,” Szeligowski said. “But it goes beyond any doubt that, at least at some point, Russia already used hybrid warfare instruments against the U.S.—and did it effectively.” Hybrid Way of Life The effects of Russia’s proxy war against Ukraine are limited to a 250-mile-long static front line in southeastern Ukraine’s Donbas region. The war is moderated in intensity and is geographically frozen according to the rules of the February 2015 cease-fire deal, known as Minsk II. More than 10,100 Ukrainians have died so far in the war. The conflict has displaced about 1.7 million people. Yet, the physical consequences of the war are quarantined from most of the country. Outside the range of the artillery, mortars, rockets, and tank shots, you’d hardly know there was war going on. On a physical battlefield, a war extends as far as the range of the weapons used. In hybrid warfare, however, the battlefield knows no limit. Consequently, there’s hardly any part of Ukrainian life that hasn’t been affected by Russia’s ongoing hybrid war. Russian cyberattacks have hit Ukraine’s power grid, water supply systems, the country’s banking system (shutting down ATMs), its largest international airport, and the electoral process. In December 2016, a cyberattack, which Ukrainian officials attributed to Russia, took down one-fifth of Kyiv’s electrical grid. Since 2014, Ukrainian security services have thwarted numerous cyberattacks in which malware from abroad was used in attempts to steal classified information from Ukrainian government networks. In the eyes of Ukrainian security officials, the internet has become as much of a battlefield as the trenches in the Donbas region. The main goal of Russia’s information warfare, according to Ukrainian security officials, is to incite civil unrest throughout all of Ukraine and to undermine the government’s credibility. Since 2014, Ukraine has established a Situation Center for Cybersecurity, and Ukrainian officials have fostered closer ties to Western intelligence agencies to bolster their cyberdefenses. Security State Russia’s purchase of $100,000 worth of Facebook advertisements in the run-up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election sparked a media frenzy in America and an outcry from lawmakers for social media sites to provide better transparency about the identity of those who purchase advertisements on their sites. In Ukraine, Russia has been exploiting social media as a weapon of war for years. In a sweeping ban announced in May, Ukrainian officials banned Russian internet search engines, including Yandex, as well as popular Russian social media sites such as VKontakte, which millions of Ukrainians used. The ban prompted some pushback from Ukrainians, who used these sites for many daily tasks and for social reasons. But Ukrainian officials insisted the sites posed a national security threat, which warranted the free speech trade-off. Also in May, Ukraine banned commercially available Russian software, including anti-virus software from Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab—the same company U.S. officials now say was used as a Trojan horse for Russian intelligence agencies to steal classified information from the U.S. government. “The risk that the Russian government, whether acting on its own or in collaboration with Kaspersky, could capitalize on access provided by Kaspersky products to compromise federal information and information systems directly implicates U.S. national security,” the Department of Homeland Security said in a Sept. 13 statement posted to its website. U.S. intelligence officials said Russian intelligence services had modified anti-virus software from Kaspersky Lab to clandestinely search computers around the world for classified U.S. government documents and top-secret information. “Possessing a worldwide deployment of sensors may be too great a temptation for any country’s intelligence service to ignore, and Kaspersky may have been forced into a quiet business partnership with the Russian government,” Geers, the NATO cybersecurity specialist, said. Similarly, news reports recently detailed how Russian military forces have been targeting the smartphones of NATO troops to gather intelligence. Ukrainian soldiers in the eastern war zone have long been advised by their leaders not to turn on their smartphones while in the war zone. Russian forces reportedly have used the cell signals emitting from Ukrainian soldiers’ phones to target its artillery. And for years Ukrainian soldiers have reported receiving death threats and demands for their surrender from their enemies over cellphone text messages. New Weapons Journalism has been one of Russia’s most lethal weapons against Ukraine. Ukrainian officials have banned a slew of Russian TV stations from broadcasting in Ukraine, and foreign journalists accused of spreading Russian propaganda have been booted out of the country. Anti-propaganda outlets in Ukraine such as StopFake.org also monitor media reports for Russian disinformation and are dedicated to setting the record straight. To counter Russian propaganda in the war zone, Ukraine’s government has rebuilt its TV and radio broadcast network in the east—which Russia and its separatist proxies destroyed in the opening days of the war. For years, Ukrainian citizens in eastern Ukraine could access only Russian TV channels for their news. Now, Ukraine has taken back control of the airwaves. While not as evident or as spectacular as the artillery bombardments and the tank battles, the battle for broadcast dominance in eastern Ukraine is a key piece of the overall war effort for Kyiv. After all, many Ukrainian citizens in eastern Ukraine can’t tell whether the artillery they are living under is fired from Ukrainian or Russian forces. And so long as they had access only to Russian television networks—which exclusively painted Ukrainian forces as the aggressor and, consequently, responsible for all civilian casualties—public opinion toward Ukraine’s central government was under an endless stress test as the war dragged on. Now, with Ukraine able to defend itself on the airwaves, Russia has lost a potent weapon to turn the citizens of eastern Ukraine against their own government. Similarly, U.S. lawmakers have debated how to defend the U.S. population against Kremlin-backed news outlets, including RT (formerly Russia Today) and Sputnik, which U.S. officials have called out as Russian propaganda mouthpieces. The FBI reportedly has turned to a U.S. law intended to prevent the spread of Nazi propaganda to determine whether the two Russian media outlets should register as foreign agents. In America, as has been the case in Ukraine, manipulation of the media by a foreign power increasingly is regarded as a hostile act warranting retaliation. “America has experienced a sustained attempt by a hostile power to feed and exploit our country’s division,” former President George W. Bush said in an Oct. 19 speech in New York. Russia “has made a project of turning Americans against each other,” Bush said, adding, “Foreign aggressions, including cyberattacks, disinformation, and financial influence, should never be downplayed or tolerated.”     Sourse: http://dailysignal.com/2017/10/27/russia-field-tested-hybrid-warfare-ukraine-cyberthreat-matters-us/

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JONATHAN LITTMAN Founder at SmartUp.life UGTI on Facebook How Ukraine’s Cyber Chief Can Help the US Beat Russia Welcome to the age of cyber warfare. “We are all easy to influence,” warned Dmytro Shymkiv, Deputy Head of the Presidential Administration of Ukraine and Secretary of Ukraine’s National Reforms Council, at the chilling start of a computer security panel at last week’s FiRe conference. “You can say we are not, that we know how to filter, but with three years of working on and facing this, anybody, including myself, is vulnerable to social influence on me, on my family, on my kids, on any of your friends.” The dangers are only going to increase, says Shymkiv, and companies or nations may not know what hit them until it’s too late. The latest threats, he says, are all but undetectable by traditional computer security methods. Our minds, elections and governments are being manipulated one keystroke at a time. And North Korea is considered to be a new looming threat. “Every day my team and I are responsible for cyber security in the [Ukrainian] Presidential Office, we see viruses that are not detectable,” said Shymkiv. “We’ve seen viruses which are targeting particular individuals, in particular departments, and they’re constructed based on the social understanding of social media by particular people.” These sorts of first-hand sci-fi glimpses of extraordinary developments right around the corner – some frightening, some hopeful, but all actionable – were what made the Future in Review (FiRe) conference in Park City, Utah a compelling event, a place where knowledge and access were intertwined, a world warp where you could not only meet influential international leaders like Shymkiv, but lunch or have a drink with a former top CIA technologist, renowned NASA scientist or elite computer geek. FiRe sparked conversations among people from vastly different disciplines. The intense, three-day symposium has a history of drawing big thinkers from diverse fields – deep science, medicine, computing, and finance – to share forecasts and critical insights on large scale issues. It’s a conference based on the premise that breakthroughs come when bright minds from all walks come together to make a difference. And perhaps no one was more forcefully driving the urgency of a needed dramatic change in global thinking and policy than Shymkiv. Ukraine: From the Front Line in the Cyberwars of the Future Shymkiv spoke of how in the last two years, Russia has been electronically spying on a wide swath of social media users comprising roughly half Ukraine’s population in a broad-based thought control program right out of Orwell’s 1984. “People say, ‘Well, that’s a science fiction.’ It’s not. When the annexation of Crimea took place, they [Russia] shut down the internet to Ukraine, and they used social media to influence people’s behavior. And you can influence people’s behavior. You do it in a nice way, posting things to their friends, et cetera. There’s a whole factory in Russia doing this.” Not only that, says Shymkiv, but a whole army of experts who are perfecting the engineering of a sophisticated underlying behavioral science that has magnified the potency of the assaults: “Russia recruits psychiatrists, scientists, and neurologists, who construct these things, to target particular individuals.” Shymkiv’s story could not have been more topical. Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg was in Washington, DC last week on a PR mission, attempting to deflect heat for the 3,000 Russia-linked Facebook ads her company recently turned over to congressional investigators. “We don’t want this kind of foreign interference,” Sandberg said. “These ads are divisive, and they are down, and the pages are down, because they are from fake accounts.” Facebook has faced mounting public criticism for failing to detect and prevent the election-influencing ads, which are expected to be released soon after a November 1 congressional hearing featuring Facebook, Twitter and Google. Facebook takes “enormous responsibility” for the Russian ad scandal, Sandberg said: “Things happened on our network during the election that should not have happened.” Sandberg might have learned a thing or two had she attended the FiRe conference and met Shymkiv and other experts. Bob Flores, who once held the title of Chief Technology Officer at the Central Intelligence Agency, and is now a co-founder and partner at Cognitio Corp., led the panel on Russia’s Infowar Machines and noted that Ukraine has been and will continue to be on the front lines in the cyberwars of the future “because these tactics have a way of evolving from the testing ground, into Western Europe and the United States.” The Petya Virus and the Campaign for a Global ID Exhibit A should give everyone pause: this summer’s Petya virus attack. Tax time in the US is often dreaded. But in Ukraine this June, said Shymkiv, summer tax software turned deadly. Hundreds of thousands of companies, and the computers of CFOs and chief accountants within the ministry of finance had been receiving tax software updates with a dastardly, hidden time bomb. “Within the code that’s been distributed to these computers, they’ve [Russia] been extracting financial information and digital signatures, and hell knows what,” said Shymkiv. “And then, in the classic Soviet style, when the Soviets robbed the villages in Ukraine, during hunger times, they burned the buildings, the villages. So, they decided to bring a virus that burned these PCs. It was constructed in a way so that it spreads through all the organization within an hour.” The supposed ransomware element was false. “If you didn’t switch off your computer within an hour, your computer became a brick.” Pulling the plug would have helped, said Shymkiv, but most victims were too dazed to move fast. “Within the first hours, the top major companies in Ukraine lost almost 90% of their infrastructure.” Petya wreaked havoc worldwide, striking hospitals, governments and companies hard (Fed-Ex alone recently tallied its losses at $300 million) and Shymkiv said it may be only the start. “Yesterday we talked about personalized medicine,” he said, referring to Leroy Hood’s keynote on how we could use technology to end disease and solve the healthcare crisis. “Now we’re seeing personalized viruses.” Firewalls or classical defense infrastructures won’t be sufficient” to protect us. Project StopFake Fights Russian Lies During a week when the hit animation show South Park brutally mocked Zuckerberg for profiting from fake news, and Sandberg was essentially lobbying Congress to avoid future regulation, Shymkiv was taking the long view. He pointed out that Ukraine was one of the first to create a team of journalists to spot and debunk fake news before it further threatens democracy. StopFake.org, an inspired group of Ukrainian digital journalism students on a mission to expose “untruthful information about events in Ukraine” rose to the challenge during Russian’s brutal Crimean annexation, and have so far identified more than 1,000 Russian-engineered fake news stories. Incredibly, StopFake was launched in the spring of 2014, two full years before Russia began manipulating the US presidential election process, tainting Facebook and Twitter with fake news. Surrounded by journalists after his FiRe talk, Shymkiv said far more can be done. “We’re still formulating, with fake news spreading, how it gets disseminated. It’s interesting to analyze the flows, to analyze through what critical points in the past fake news went, and who are the spreading points. And this analysis can be done. It’s basic tools. Can the social media companies do it? Yes, they can.” So far, Facebook, Twitter and other social media companies have dragged their feet, appearing to have chosen profit over transparency. By making it easy for nefarious entities to exploit anonymity or introduce bots, traffic has been falsely inflated, leading to an increase in earnings. It’s not in the social media giants’ commercial interest to deny access to bots or Russian operatives. “The main mistakes of social media have been not putting together basic rules for validation of identity,” said Shymkiv. Shymkiv is a proponent of a form of “Global ID” in which personal identity is protected. Opponents charge that stringent identification controls would contradict the “free internet” but Shymkiv points out that when lives are at risk we accept tradeoffs. For example, he doesn’t mind being searched getting onto an airplane, because that extra step is necessary to prevent terrorism. Shymkiv’s dedication is clear. He was the CEO of Microsoft Ukraine when his president called upon him to join his nation’s government after Russian’s annexation of Crimea. Drawing from his deep technology background and astute understanding of social media, he’s been working closely with the Ukrainian cyber police to improve security. “It’s a friendly conversation. They’re trying to follow the physical world, while in the cyber world things are much faster. And the challenge for law enforcement is exactly that, how to do things [and prevent crimes] and not violate individual freedoms. But it’s a joint consent. We’ll become more cautious with all the things that are happening around us. We need [the tragedy of] 9-11, we need the shooting in the Las Vegas, we need all these things happening in France and Germany, or Ukraine. We need all these things to finally realize that we need to start changing some policies.” “But countries will not be able to do it alone,” said Shymkiv. “It’s not the governments, but society that needs to start pulling it together. About the Conference The Future in Review (FiRe) conference has long influenced thought leaders from diverse disciplines. Now in its 15thyear, this four-day crash-course networking bonanza is not just another tech conference crammed with entrepreneurs seeking to attract venture capital. Rather, it’s a chance to meet, share ideas, and solve problems with some of today’s most important technologists and scientists shaping the future. The conference is masterminded by futurist Mark Anderson, Founder and CEO of Strategic News Service (SNS) and publisher of the weekly SNS Global Report on technology and the global economy (www.stratnews.com), read by Bill Gates, Elon Musk, and other major tech moguls. This year’s conference started on a hopeful note. Health was a central emphasis. Not just the health of our data and supercomputing network systems, but the health of our planet and bodies. In his insightful keynote on “The End of Disease: Solving the Healthcare Crisis,” Leroy Hood, President and Co-Founder, Institute for Systems Biology; and SVP and Chief Science Officer, Providence Health & Services, spoke of personalized medicine, and how through monitoring our wellness we can stave off or even prevent disease, thereby extending our biological youth. Critical needs in cybersecurity and IP protection were another central focus, from risk analysis to breach protection. Security experts such as Robert Loeb, Solution Architect of enterprise cyber security firm Micro Focus, discussed the implications of the upcoming GDPR compliance standard stipulating that by 2018, any company with EU-based customers needs to implement far more identity protection than currently practiced in the US. IP theft by China was another big theme, covered in depth by Evan Anderson and Richard Marshall. Berit Anderson, CEO and Editor-in-Chief of Scout.ai, detailed Cambridge Analytica’s insidious social media manipulations in the 2016 US presidential election, during her “Computational Propaganda” session with BBC World News Service podcaster Ed Butler. The FiReFilms program tapped attendees’ emotions with several captivating film trailers, and filmmaker interviews. A screening of “Chasing Coral” educated conference attendees on the devastation of the world’s coral ecosystem through global warming. (Just last year, for instance, a third of the coral in the Great Barrier Reef died.) Fighting disease, including heroin addiction, was another focus, covered in Jenny Mackenzie’s documentary “Dying in Vein”, and Katia Moritz’s film “Undiagnosed: Medical Refugees”, which addressed the plight of individuals who suffer from mysterious diseases. Pattern recognition and large-scale image and data processing, and computing power is another looming sea change in technology as we know it. Larry Smarr, the founding director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), a UC San Diego/UC Irvine partnership, led panels and workshops in “Century-Scale Breakthroughs: Biology Driving Pictorial Supercomputing” and the FiRe CTO Design Challenge, “Comparative Image Computing: Creating the First Pictorial Processing System.” During the last hours of the conference, a team of technologists worked through the night to prototype a new computer systems architecture to better anticipate and respond to everything from natural disasters to fake news. For more about next year’s conference, visit The Future in Review. Sourse: http://smartup.life/how-ukraines-cyber-chief-can-help-the-us-beat-russia/?utm_source=FIRE2018&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=FiRe+2018%3A+Early+Bird+Registration+Extended

"Ukraine starts eighth round of talks on FTA with Turkey"

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"Ukrainian, Canadian space agencies to sign bilateral document on cooperation"

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25 October, 2017

"Ukraine moves up to 76th position in Doing Business ranking"

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"Korean company interested in building grain complex in Chornomorsk port"

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24 October, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Cybersecurity Center Cybersecurity Center The relative lack of investment in technology and cybersecurity over the past decade in Ukraine means Ukrainian business and government largely skipped a generation of cybersecurity solutions, most of which have proven ineffective against emerging state-sponsored attacks. That is the bad news. The good news is Ukraine is ready to modernize and capable of mounting an effective defense with help from allies. Providing this help is in the national strategic interests of Ukraine as well as the United States because Ukraine is a canary in the cyber-space coal mine. The threats Ukraine faces are harbingers of things to come for the US and its allies. By ensuring that Ukraine adopts leading cybersecurity solutions and best practices we will not only provide Ukraine with the best protection from cyber-attacks, but it also helps US experts develop new and more effective technologies and strategies in the future. It will also help establish Ukraine as a secure, stable, prosperous and reliable ally in Eastern Europe. To achieve these objectives, we propose a US-Ukraine Cybersecurity Policy and Research Center (the “Center”) with offices in Kyiv, DC and Silicon Valley to both quickly and efficiently create a digital environment wherein communications are secure, critical infrastructure is protected and businesses and trade can thrive. We believe that a public-private partnership is the appropriate structure for the Center, which will draw participants from US and Ukrainian companies as well as government (including, perhaps, the State Service of Special Communication and Information Protection of Ukraine, the National Security Council of Ukraine, the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate). With these various stakeholders working together, the Center will: • Develop policy recommendations as well as engage in collaborative research and development projects to improve the level of cybersecurity in critical systems necessary to the security and stability of Ukraine. • Focus on helping the Ukrainian government, military and private sector to solve difficult cybersecurity problems while gaining agility and cutting costs. • Take an agnostic, best practices approach to ensuring that Ukrainian companies are provided the best possible solutions to resolve their cybersecurity needs. • Become largely self-sustaining. Several key stakeholders and experts in Ukraine as well as the United States (DC as well as Silicon Valley) have committed to support developing, establishing and operating the Center and we will provide updates they become available over the coming weeks.

"Kernel to increase EBITDA by 1.6 times by 2021 FY"

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"Poroshenko calls to accelerate process of formation of united territorial communities"

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23 October, 2017

"Ukraine, Poland sign memo of cooperation in building via carpatia highway "

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"Some 154 more Ukrainian goods are exported to Canada"

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21 October, 2017

"U.S. envoy Volker to visit Ukraine Oct 27 "

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"Stoltenberg announces dates for next NATO summit"

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20 October, 2017

"Economic Development Ministry: Ukraine’s exports to EU four times larger than exports to Russia"

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"Some 98% of customs declarations filed in electronic form"

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19 October, 2017
PAVLO IVASHCHENKO Director of "Institute of Geophysics and problems of Earth "Ltd UGTI on Facebook HOW TO QUICKLY IDENTIFY AND RELIABLY SURVEY DEPOSITS Hundreds of oil and gas companies in the world annually go into the red by drilling "empty" wells onshore and offshore. Many times bigger losses are in the lost profit, which could be given by discovered fields. The same, but more dramatic situation occurs with the development of underground fresh water, especially in arid regions. It's not just business in here, but also the health and life of people. What is the problem of exploration activity? The main problem is that the most of methods of geophysics conformto the patternof "interpretation of indirect physical parameters" that native to the target minerals. So there is no direct identification of a specific hydrocarbon or other mineral. As a result, the reliability of such tests leaves a lot to be desired. The Ukrainian company "Institute of Geophysics and Earth Problems", Ltd., has developed and successfully applies innovative resonant technology (IRT) of spectral-resonant (remote) and magnetic resonance (on-site) survey of territories. This technology refers to the "direct" methods of exploration activity and conform to the pattern of "direct identification of the chemical composition" of the minerals. The main idea of such a pattern is use of the phenomenon of resonance as the principle for the identification of minerals. More detailsabout the theoretical basis, problems and specifics of the technical feasibility of the ITR can be found inour article in the European scientific journal "Geoscientific Instrumentation, Methods and Data Systems (GI)" (Copernicus): https://www.geosci-instrum-method-data-syst.net/5/551/2016/gi-5-551-2016.pdf The technology is patented in Germany and Ukraine, tested in the USA and Russia, successfully applied on various continents for remote search of minerals. We suggest that you consider the possibility of applying IRT in various territories (land and shelf) for solving different problems of search and inspection of hydrocarbon deposits, underground fresh water and other minerals. Advantages of technology: - quick survey of both small and large territories on land and sea; - high reliability of hydrocarbon identification, more than 90%; - relatively low cost of work. The conducted works are completely safe for humans and the environment. We can: - promptly identify and determine deposits at the regional stage; - detailed survey of area and detected deposits, providing data on topography of deposits, number and thickness of horizons, presence of gas caps and pressure in them, the deep sections of deposits and the calculation of predicted resources; - test location designed for drilling. To keeping data current and determine the optimal drilling location, we can offer on-site measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance to depths of 5 km or more. The time required for testing and reporting is 1 to 2 months. Above we talked about customer interaction over services of IRT. However, other, much more effective business forms of mutual cooperation are possible. One of these directions is partner business project “Find, drill and sell a deposit”. The main idea of the project is reflected in its title: “Find, drill and sell a deposit”. In fact we offer to radically reduce time of detection and deposit survey, substantially decrease financial expense on ‘entry’ and preparation of detected deposits for sale, thus providing the super high profitability of the project. The survey area decreases successively, from stage to stage (Fig.3) by means of locating of deposit contours, which allows to substantially shorten the survey time and financial expenses on geophysics. The total time of project execution, including simultaneous carrying of basic works, is 1 year. The outcome of project implementation (profit) can be thousands of percent. We believe that application of the innovative technology can bring economic benefit to your company which can be achieved within the shortest period of time.   PAVLO IVASHCHENKO Autor PhD Professor in Technical Sciences, associate professor. Is an active member of Georgian National Academy   TATIANA TAVORSKAYA Author assistance in preparing the article.

"Kernel secures $200 mln credit line"

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"KSG Agro launches two biofuel BOILER houses in Dnipropetrovsk Region schools"

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18 October, 2017

"Ukraine may get IMF tranche by end of this year - NBU"

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"UAE, Kyiv to develop cooperation in tourism and advertising"

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17 October, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukrainian Dream - Economic Renaissance of Ukraine The sixth Festival of the Innovative Projects "Sikorsky Challenge 2017" started in Kyiv. Every year it is held by the National Technical University of Ukraine "Kyiv Polytechnic Institute named after Igor Sikorsky" - the leader of startup innovations in Ukraine (new promising projects in various scientific fields). Traditionally, within the framework of the festival, there is an all-Ukrainian Competition of Startups, where the developers and representatives of a large business investment meet. One of the features of the contest is that domestic and foreign businessmen sit on the jury. They vote for a particular project only if they are willing to invest their own money in it. The festival "Sikorsky Challange" is the most significant event in the field of innovative technologies. This year, people's deputies of Ukraine - Sergiy Taruta and Alexander Danchenko were its participants. The last one was a student of the capital "polytechnics", and now he is a member of the jury of the festival and the head of the Verkhovna Rada Committee on Informatization and Communications. - In 2012, when the competition of startups was held for the first time, only two projects received investments for total cost $22,000, - said Mikhail Zgurovsky, rector of the KPI named after Igor Sikorsky. - And already in 2015, $26 million was invested in 23 innovative projects. The sensation of the festival was the news about the creation of a whole system for the realization of Ukrainian inventors’ creative ideas. Thus, under the "KPI" a scientific park was opened, where the winners of the startup competition can realize their projects with the support of grant and venture funds. At the same time, the state does not stand aside, but begins to take the first steps to introduce the valuable ideas of the local “Kulibins” into life. "Now we face the task of creating an innovative ecosystem under the KPI," said Vladimir Stavnyuk, the Chairman of the Board of the State Finance Institution for Innovations (SFII) at the Ministry of Economic Development and Trade of Ukraine. - Why is it important? For example, there is a technology park (the same ecosystem) at Jagiellonski University in Krakow, that provides employment for 150,000 people. True, Poland invests 4 billion euros annually in its startups. Unfortunately, today Ukraine can not make big financial injections into innovative development. But we offer an alternative - a mechanism to support foreign investors. "If scientific ideas are supported by the state and large foreign investors, it can increase the GDP growth from today's 4% to 50%," Mikhail Zgurovsky said, the rector of the KPI named after Igor Sikorsky. - Therefore, together with our partner Henry Shterenberg, president of the American company UGTI Inc., we are developing a fundamentally new concept of cooperation with foreign companies. Henry Shterenberg takes the mission of an operator to attract foreign companies that will invest in Ukrainian startups and bring them to the international market. The help of UGTI is very important, because there is a mental gap between Western and Ukrainian business cultures. To overcome this gap UGTI will act as an intermediary, whose task is to explain to foreign investors how to work in Ukraine, and to prepare our startups for cooperation with foreign businessmen. - Among countries with emerging economies Ukraine is the most attractive for foreign investors, - the president of the American company UGTI explains, he is a Ukrainian by origin. - First of all it is because of its intellectual fund - "golden heads". However, I consider my task not only to attract foreign cash flows to Ukraine, but also to help the country where I was born and raised to make an economic breakthrough. That is why I begin the implementation of my global project "Ukrainian Dream" - this is the plan for the economic renaissance of the country on the basis of technological, engineering, and scientific resources. I am convinced that Ukraine can dominate in the world in 24 economic and scientific areas. It is only necessary to create conditions for the development and support of the intellect of Ukrainians. --- Author: Pavel Nek Source: http://vremya.eu/novosti/novosti-biznesa/genri-shterenberg-prezntoval-ukrainskuyu.html

"Association of Japanese Entrepreneurs in Ukraine mulling investing in Odesa region"

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"EBRD considers introduction of auctions to stimulate renewable energy sources for Ukraine to be promising"

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16 October, 2017

"Finance Minister Danyliuk: World Bank president to visit Ukraine next month"

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"Ukrainian Finance Minister says that progress has been made in negotiations with IMF on gas tariffs in Ukraine"

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14 October, 2017

"Association of Japanese Entrepreneurs in Ukraine mulling investing in Odesa region"

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"SBU warns of possible large-scale cyber attack"

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13 October, 2017

"Denmark interested in cooperation with Ukraine within Energy Efficiency Fund – Zubko"

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"Ukraine PM confident of receiving new IMF tranche -agency"

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12 October, 2017
MYROSLAVA HARTMOND Managing Director at Triptych: Global Arts Workshop (Ukraine) UGTI on Facebook The world has much to learn from Ukraine’s story, and we can use culture to package this message attractively for a global audience FALLEN: A research exhibition with a mission This year, as the world takes stock of the centenary of the Russian Revolution of 1917, I am co-curating ‘FALLEN. Revolution – Propaganda - Iconoclasm’, a research exhibit at a leading British university that looks at the rise and fall of Lenin’s cult of personality --- and Ukraine’s role in its unmaking. Iconic works by Alexander Rodchenko, Gustav Klutsis and Sergei Eisenstein centre around a 4 metre long 1:1 scale model of Lenin’s finger from the 100m high sculpture proposed for the Palace of the Soviets that serves to remind us of the absurdity of the Soviet Union’s ruling elite’s ambition. The exhibition also features original artworks, sculptures, and propaganda posters from the Soviet period, as well as contemporary photography by Niels Ackermann and Donald Weber. Empty plinths persist as stark reminders of the absence of totalitarian rule, becoming points of convergence for contending visions of national representation, posing the question: ‘What next?’ As photographer Weber reminds us, ‘History hates empty pedestals’. From the exhilaration of the early Soviet years, to the systematic imposition of a personality cult that was used to enforce the will of the Communist Party, FALLEN documents the inglorious fate of the Soviet Union’s deification of Lenin. Propaganda paintings, photography, posters and film investigate the glorification of Lenin, first by Stalin to consolidate his power and then by the Communist Party who recognised the potency of art as a political weapon. FALLEN is accompanied by a public programme that expand on ideas raised in the show, including talks by Dawn Ades, Owen Hatherley, my fantastic co-curator Jess Twyman and myself, and a film screening led by John Haynes, while University’s Arts Outreach team respond with a Family Day. --- VIDEO: FALLEN Exhibition Tour by Myroslava Hartmond (Art Exchange, UoE) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ctt1wgZGcGw&lc=z23ii51zwmyhufoj504t1aokgofufq3qfjyla1ldwy1bbk0h00410   What can Ukraine’s ‘Leninfall’ teach the West? Ukraine’s decommunization process, which took many forms since the first Lenin was toppled in the wake of the Euromaidan protests in December 2013, has been both widely supported and harshly criticized. However, it has certainly not gone unnoticed, and Ukraine can capitalize on this heightened visibility to share its experience of rethinking the symbolic landscape of its public spaces. Today, not a single Lenin statue remains standing on its pedestal in Ukraine. Order No. 200, issued on 4th April 2016 by the Ministry of Culture, stripped 794 cultural objects in 13 Ukrainian regions of their ‘heritage’ status, including ‘monuments to V. Lenin, M. Frunze, F. Dzerzhynskiy, S. Kirov and other perpetrators of the totalitarian propaganda of the Soviet regime.’ Their various fates are the subject of ‘Looking for Lenin’, a book by Niels Ackermann and Sébastien Gobert, to which I contributed an introductory essay. Some have been stored away by the authorities, others removed from their original spot and laid out, some are broken, tampered with beyond recognition, while others – such as Oleksandr Milov’s Darth Vader – have been upcycled and have even featured in international news. Ukraine’s Leninfall has perhaps more in common with the Rhodes Must Fall campaign in South Africa and Oxford, UK, or the removal of Confederate monuments in the US earlier this year than it does with its own early waves of Soviet monument disposal, where the sentiment of banishing the symbols of Communism was the immediate concern of a newly-independent state (and not a symbolic war against a past that has since become history). While Western democracies have shied away from recreating the likenesses of their leaders in durable materials (at least on an industrial scale!), we have nonetheless seen in recent years a heightened awareness of the statuary and symbols that populate our public spaces. It is for this reason that we can garner much insight from the recent experience of a contemporary European state that has many layers of history beneath its surface. The empty plinths that litter the towns and villages of Ukraine today, much like the stumps of felled trees, ask the question: what next? Weber’s work exposes the ugliness of the ‘decommunized’ landscape, purged of Lenin and yet devoid of signs of development. Scrawled with slogans in one instance, damaged beyond repair in another, the empty plinths point to the drabness of their surroundings. No longer ‘colonized’ by Lenin, the vacant pedestal becomes an arena for contending visions of national representation. We hope that this exhibition will help to write Ukraine into the historic context of the Russian Revolution Centenary, and draw much-needed parallels between its contemporary challenges and the heritage debates that take place in the West today.     FALLEN Revolution – Propaganda - Iconoclasm 16 September – 4 November 2017 Art Exchange, University of Essex, Colchester campus More information about the exhibition can be found here. http://www.artexchange.org.uk/exhibition/fallen

"Iran, Ukraine to Form Joint Economic Commission"

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"Ukroboronprom hopes to expand military cooperation with U.S. amid hybrid war"

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11 October, 2017

"GUAM member countries agree on free-trade zone"

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"Ukrainian space industry enterprises loaded by a third in h1 2017"

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10 October, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Dentons Global Public Procurement Insights Webinar: Ukraine Thank you to anyone who was able to join me, John Herbst (US Ambassador to Ukraine from 2003–2006 and current Director of the Atlantic Council's Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center) and Dentons partners Mark Meagher and Markian Silecky on September 28, 2017 for our webinar discussing Ukraine's business climate, and opportunities and challenges for US and other foreign companies doing business or interested in doing business there. If you were unable to join the webinar live, this is your lucky day! Please find a copy of our presentation and a link to the video of the webinar below. PRESENTATION https://gallery.mailchimp.com/fc2ded176309d46ef7deb2bac/files/eaf9e5d4-b55d-487f-ab06-409f0cf18f7b/Public_Procurement_Insights_Webinar_Ukraine_105296514_1_.pdf   VIDEO https://dentons2.adobeconnect.com/pzpufpflllh3/

"EU Ambassador to Ukraine backs improvement of business climate for attracting investment"

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"Ukraine intends to finish cooperation program with IMF in 2018"

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9 October, 2017

"Ukraine’s barley exports to China 87% up from last year"

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"Erdogan arrives for talks with Poroshenko"

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7 October, 2017

"Ukraine to host NATO PA session for the first time in 2020"

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"Trade volume between Ukraine and Moldova increased by more than 30% - Moldovan PM"

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6 October, 2017

"Trump urged to give Ukraine weapons – NYT"

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"Rada ratifies agreement with U.S. on restoration of cooperation in science and technology"

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5 October, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine - Sikorsky Challenge - Innovations & Start Ups I been in Ukraine for almost 2 months now. It is the longest single visit since me and my family left the Soviet Union back in 1989. A lot of things changed. There is no way to qualify the excitement I personally feel about the future and economic potential of Ukraine. No, I am not referring to 2% to 3% GDP growth that being projected by the government. Such growth with inflation over 14% is a slow road to economic cemetery. I am excited about what we call "Economic Renaissance of Ukraine" based on Scientific fields of 21st century. UGTI team identified 23 scientific fields of 21st Century. We believe Ukraine has opportunity to be in the top 3 world-wide in each one of the fields. Only INTELLECT of the Ukrainians can give country sustainable annual GDP growth of 10% for forceable future. Technologies of each scientific fields we identified is in high demand around the world. Each field has opportunity to grow into multi billion dollar industry for Ukraine. For this to happen it is essential that Government, Academia and Business of Ukraine work in collaboration to achieve ultimate benefits for the people of Ukraine. Sikorsky Challenge today represents a major step in the right direction. It is a fundamental block for prosperous future. I am honored to be one of the SPEAKERS at the event. During the event, I will announce our global program "Ukrainian Dream - Economic Renaissance of Ukraine" Please see attached Sikorsky Challenge Program - I hope to see you there.   https://gallery.mailchimp.com/fc2ded176309d46ef7deb2bac/files/8efd5ab8-fe1e-486e-b0cb-de811326cebd/Program_of_the_Final_Startup_Competition_October__10_13__2017_f1.pdf

"General Electric to help modernize Ukrainian railways"

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"Iran takes interest in Ukrainian agriculture"

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4 October, 2017

"EBRD: Placement of $3 billion Eurobonds is significant Ukraine’s success"

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"Government budgets UAH 1 billion to finance Affordable Medicines program next year"

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3 October, 2017

"Economy Ministry to set up ad hoc group to increase trade between Ukraine and U.S."

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"Windkraft Ukraine launches 41 mw first stage of Novotroyitska wind farm"

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2 October, 2017

"Installed capacity of ‘green’ generation in Ukraine 18% up in nine months – NCER"

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"Ukrainian exports of computer and information services 18.3% up in h1, 2017 – EBA"

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30 September, 2017

"Apple co-founder Wozniak in Kyiv: "It's a special visit""

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"Ukraine cannot reach consensus on cryptocurrency – Central Bank explains why"

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29 September, 2017

"Intl companies ready to invest $500 mln in entertainment park in Kyiv"

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"Trade opening for Ukraine: Joint Statement by Commissioner Malmström and Deputy Minister Mykolska"

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28 September, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook The Reformers Heather Stephenson is Senior Writer and Editor for Fletcher Magazine which is published for Alumni and Friends of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. I am grateful to Ms. Stephenson for granting UGTI permission to share with our readers her article titled "The Reformers" originally published (with a fantastic illustration by Tang Yau Hoong) in the Summer 2017 issue of Tufts Magazine. This powerful piece highlights the ongoing struggle in Ukraine against the entrenched status quo which, in my view, presents no less formidable an obstacle to delivering on the promise of Maidan than Ukraine's ongoing war with Russia. "The Reformers" recounts the experience of committed reformers like Olena Tregub who until recently worked for the Government of Ukraine as the director within Ukraine's Ministry of Economic Development and Trade where she was responsible for overseeing a multibillion-dollar portfolio of international development projects. Ms. Tregub is no longer with the Ukrainian Ministry of Economics and Trade but after spending last week in New York as an attendee and speaker at the Concordia Summit (https://www.concordia.net/annualsummit/2017annualsummit/) she is back in Kyiv as the recently appointed Secretary General for the Independent Defense Anti-Corruption Committee established by Transparency International Defense & Security and Transparency International Ukraine to fight corruption in the Ukrainian defense sector. Please join me in thanking Olena Tregub and those dedicated Ukrainian reformers like her.   https://tuftsmagazine.com/issues/fletcher/reformers-0

"Kyivkhlib starts exporting products to U.S. in 2017"

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"Ukraine, Israel reach preliminary agreements on liberalization of industrial goods markets"

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27 September, 2017

"DuPont Pioneer launches sunflower seed production line in Poltava region"

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"Ukraine to Target Up to $1 Billion Via World Bank Lending"

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26 September, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Geothermal National & International Initiative Inc. My colleague Jack DiEnna is the Executive Director & Founder of the Geothermal National & International Initiative ("GEO-NII"). • http://www.geo-nii.org/ GEO-NII is an alliance of geothermal heat pump (GHP) industry professionals working to achieve the goals in the United States of the “Road to 30%” (market adoption for geothermal heating and cooling technologies) for the Ground Source Heat Pump (“GHP”) industry, both nationally & internationally, though federal, state, and local governmental officials, utilities providers, the design community, the HVAC industry, and end users in all market segments. GEO-NII's goal is to develop a sustainable infrastructure through professional development training. They support the adoption of IGSHPA standards & training certifications & accreditations, both nationally and internationally, for the design, installation and commissioning of GHP systems. These goals are even more important to achieve in Ukraine than in the United States because Ukraine’s acute need to quickly and cost-effectively enhance its energy security. This week I provide our readers a lesson in Geothermal Heat Pump Technology 101. In subsequent weeks, Mr. DiEnna will weigh in on specific applications of greatest interest to Ukraine so I encourage our readers to send me and Jack an email with questions or comments relating to Geo HVAC and energy security. We can be reached at: aleks.m@ukrainegti.com and jdienna@geo-nii.org. Geothermal Heat Pump Technology 101 Basic Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) Concept • GHP technology transfers heat between the steady temperature of the earth and a building no maintain the building space conditions. • Below the surface of the earth the temperature remains constant, in Virginia it is typically around 53 - 56 degrees Fahrenheit (approximately 11.6 – 13.3 Celsius). • This stable temperature provides a source for heat in the winter and a means to reject excess heat in the summer. • In a GHP system, a fluid (typically water) is circulated between the building and the ground loop piping buried in the ground. • In the summer the fluid picks up heat from the building and moves it to the ground. • In the winter the fluid picks up heat from the ground and moves it to the building. • Heat pumps in the building make this transfer of heat possible. • GHP systems exchange thermal energy between a building and the ground. • When the building needs heating, the system extracts energy from the ground and pumps it into the building where it is concentrated by the heat pump. • Conversely, when the building needs cooling, the heat from the building is concentrated by the heat pumps and the system removes heat from the building and pumps it into the ground. • This exchange of thermal energy makes the system efficient. Rather than creating heat by burning a fuel on site, the GHP system moves thermal energy between the ground and the building, using heat pump technology. • The relatively constant temperature of the ground makes this energy transfer efficient throughout the year, even during the coldest weather. • When the building needs cooling the system takes advantage of the relatively constant ground temperature that is often cooler than the outdoor air in the summer. • Alternative systems must move energy from the building to the hotter outdoor air, while the ghp system gains efficiency by transferring the energy to the cooler ground.   Benefits of GHP Include: • Low Operating Cost – The efficiency of the heat pumps operating under moderate loop temperatures provide the basis for high efficiency and low operating cost. The cost to move energy around the building is also low, as heat pumps are placed at each space. There is no need to circulate large amounts of air around the building to transport energy, nor is there a need to reheat air to maintain comfort in certain areas of a building. • Simplicity – The distributed nature of the system makes it easy to understand. A heat pump located at each space will provide independent heating and cooling. The operation of one heat pump does not affect any other heat pump. Control simply requires turning the unit on or off in response to the area that needs heating or cooling. • Low Maintenance – The heat pump itself is a packaged unit no more complex than typical residential air conditioning equipment. The components are the same as those used for outdoor applications that have much wider operating ranges and exposure to the weather. Diagnosing problems has become easier due to the distributed nature of the system. Any problem is typically closely related to the equipment serving the space. • No Supplemental Heat Required – Heat pumps can meet all of the space loads, including ventilation loads. Ventilation air can be tempered by separate heat pumps and/or conditioned with heat recovery equipment. • Low Cost Integrated Water Heating – Heat pumps can be dedicated to meet hot water loads. These heat pumps become particularly attractive when there is a large cooling load relative to the heating load. By extracting some of the heat from the ground loop for water heating, the ground heat exchanger size and cost can be reduced. • No Required Exposed Outdoor Equipment – The ground heat exchanger is buried and the heat pumps are located inside the building. Vandalism, noise, and visual screen problems are eliminated. Designers do not have to supply roof space for equipment, making options such as standing seam metal roofs or large sloped roofs possible. • Low Environmental Impact – No fossil fuels need to be consumed on site. Pollution can be best mitigated at a central power plant where electricity is produced. As the efficiency of electricity production or renewable power generation increases, so does the environmental efficiency of the heat pump system. • Level Seasonal Electric Demand – With winter heat pump operation displacing fossil fuel use and summer heat pump operation occurring at moderate, more efficient loop temperatures, the electric demand is more consistent throughout the year so the average price of electricity is reduced. • Longer Life Expectancy - Both the American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and the Electric Power Research Institute have concluded, based on independent research studies, that the appropriate service life value for geothermal heat pump technology is 20 years or more. This benchmark is the current industry standard.

"Klitschko announces construction of ‘Kyiv Disneyland’"

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"Apartment sold for cryptocurrency for the first time in Ukraine"

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25 September, 2017

"Canada's TIU to invest EUR94 mln in building five solar plants in Ukraine"

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"UkrAVTO Corporation could enter tractor market with South Korean LS tractors"

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23 September, 2017

"IMF: Ukraine has proven itself capable of implementing reforms"

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"Justin Trudeau: Canada will always remain a friend of Ukraine"

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22 September, 2017

"Agriculture, Infrastructure, Energy sectors are most promising for investment in Ukraine"

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"Ukraine president says Trump shares vision on 'new level' of defense cooperation"

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21 September, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Dentons Global Public Procurement Insights Webinar: Ukraine As noted in my post yesterday introducing the UA Global Support program, catalyzing change demands leading by example. For UGTI, the commitment to lead by example in Ukraine applies with equal force to business ethics as it does to social responsibility. At UGTI, we strive to develop an efficient, stable and profitable business on a foundation of high standards of business conduct and respect for the law. Our good name and reputation are essential to success in achieving this objective. We are developing and will adopt a Code of Business Conduct to achieve stability and success in the market economy. To learn more about why I believe leading by example in adopting and following a clear Code of Business Conduct is critical to long-term success in Ukraine please join me on Thursday, September 28 at noon Eastern for a 75-minute webinar examining key issues and opportunities for contractors supporting US and allied operations in Ukraine, cybersecurity challenges and opportunities, and openings for the sale of other products and services. I am privileged to have as my co-panelists and moderator for this discussion: • JOHN E. HERBST - US Ambassador to Ukraine from 2003–2006 and current Director of the Atlantic Council's Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center; • MARKIAN SILECKY - Dentons partner and resident in our New York and Kyiv offices; focuses on business formations, corporate law, mergers and acquisitions, and compliance, in the US, Ukraine and elsewhere internationally; and • MARK MEAGHER (moderator) - Dentons partner in our Denver and Washington, DC, offices, with 30 years' experience in US federal contracting, including providing legal advice for clients performing overseas support operations. To register for the Thursday, September 28 discussion please visit: https://goo.gl/GXFAJ5

"Ukraine shows highest investment attractiveness for last six years - President"

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"World Bank: Ukraine needs to carry out land reform as soon as possible"

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20 September, 2017

"Ukraine could get at least $10 bln from sale of Naftogaz minor stake when its reform complete"

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"Investors from U.S., UK buy 82% of Ukraine's bonds"

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19 September, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook UA Global Support To be a catalyst for change we must lead by example and UGTI hopes that the UA Global Support program will encourage other companies active in Ukraine to help Ukrainians build a more just society. This week’s post will be short in length but we hope incredibly impactful in Ukraine for years to come. We hope that our friends and colleagues share the view at UGTI that work like that performed by the Co-Pilot Project (https://razomforukraine.org/cpp/) team to address the significant deficit in high quality neurosurgical and spine surgery training in Ukraine is of critical importance and deserving of support. Fostering the development of a corporate environment in Ukraine where companies take seriously their social obligations is among UGTI’s core objectives. Beginning in 2018 UGTI will lead by example in this arena by committing to donate 2% of net revenue to projects and initiatives in Ukraine that promote the social good through the “UA Global Support” program. Over the coming months UGTI will either form or partner with an existing 501(c)3 nonprofit entity to identify and evaluate the projects and initiatives in Ukraine to which UGTI will donate – on a quarterly basis – 2% of its net revenue. I am thrilled to use this week’s post to announce that the Co-Pilot Project will be the first UA Global Support project partner. As the first partner, the Co-Pilot Project will receive the first $20,000.00 of UA Global Support funding. In the future, the nonprofit team will be solely responsible for selecting the projects and initiatives to receive donations under UA Global Support program.

"LYBID project should be completed despite all difficulties – State Space Agency"

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"General Electric considering setting up production of locomotives and spare parts in Ukraine"

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18 September, 2017

"EU proposes five-year program to support energy efficiency fund"

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"Chinese market opened for exports of Ukrainian sunflower cake, beet pulp"

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16 September, 2017

"Poroshenko, Trump to meet on September 21"

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"Ukraine-India commission on agrarian cooperation to start operating this autumn"

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15 September, 2017

"Chinese market opened for exports of Ukrainian sunflower cake, beet pulp"

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"EBRD President: We believe in Ukraine as one of our largest markets"

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14 September, 2017
MARIYA SOROKA President, Marketing Director at Razom for Ukraine Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook THE CO-PILOT PROJECT: NEUROSURGERY TRAINING IN UKRAINE Aleks Mehrle, UGTI President The Co-Pilot Project (CPP) is a Razom for Ukraine (https://razomforukraine.org/) initiative conceived, launched and realized by my friends Dr. Luke Tomycz and Mariya Soroka. CPP aims to address the significant deficit in high quality neurosurgical and spine surgery training in Ukraine, a country of 45 million people in eastern Europe. Just as a co-pilot acts as another set of eyes and ears for the pilot, their mission is to send surgeons from North America to mentor and aid Ukrainian surgeons through difficult cases. Luke and Mariya recently returned from 3+ intensive and rewarding months in Ukraine and Mariya was kind enough to prepare a short summary of their work and next steps for our readers. For more information on the lifesaving work of the Co-Pilot Project team (and to make a donation) please visit: https://razomforukraine.org/cpp/ Like Mariya and Luke, the UGTI team is are supremely optimistic about the future of Ukraine and Ukrainian medicine. We hope you join me and the CPP team for its main fundraising event of 2017 in NYC this November. Okean Elzy frontman, Slava Vakarchuk will perform a private concert in NYC with special guest, jazz pianist Fima Chupakin. This event will be held November 4th at 8 PM at a private residence in Manhattan. Tickets cost $500 and funds will go to support 2018 Co-Pilot Project efforts.To secure your ticket email Mariya: mariya@razomforukraine.org Mariya Soroka, President of Razom for Ukraine Luke and I just came back to New York from our 2017 Ukrainian trip. We are very excited about all we have been able to accomplish with the help of a committed team of Ukrainian and American volunteers and partners. We are also very eager to share our thoughts about the future of the Co-Pilot Project, especially the recently formulated plan to launch an international fellowship program in Ukraine. First some updates: • Our team continues to grow and has recruited the professional support of the following individuals in Kyiv: photographer and film-maker, Ruslan Batytskyi; organizer and administrator, Anya Siryk. • We have welcomed our second official "co-pilot", Jefferson Miley, MD (neurointerventionalist from Dell Medical School in Austin, TX) who accompanied us in Lviv for a week of operating, giving lectures, and teaching local physicians. • By the end of August, we project to have performed over 40 major neurosurgical procedures including: aneurysm clipping, aneurysm coil embolization, complex skull base tumor resections, pediatric brain tumor resections, spinal surgery, Chiari decompression surgery, endoscopic third ventriculostomy, lesionectomy and hemispherotomy for epilepsy, and vagal nerve stimulation...on infants and adults. • We have now assisted with surgical procedures and developed working relationships with Ukrainian surgeons at multiple sites all around Ukraine: International Neurosurgery Center (Kyiv), Romadanov Institute of Neurosurgery (Kyiv), Children's Regional Medical Center (Lviv), Adult Trauma Hospital (Lviv), Children's Regional Medical Center (Lutsk), Children's Regional Medical Center (Odesa). • Nearly $12,000 has been spent to date to help pay for implants and the costs of highly complex brain surgeries to help provide these life-saving operations for patients who otherwise cannot afford them. • Igor Kurilets MD, one of our Ukrainian neurosurgical partners, will attend the European Association of Neurosurgery course in Brno, Czech Republic, one of the first of many training courses we hope to fund. • We have identified partners interested in building a neurosurgical center of excellence with a training program that will secure the sustainability of the Co-Pilot Project and ensure that high-quality neurosurgeons train young surgeons in Ukraine in the immediate future and for generations to come. Short version: We continue to form strong relationships with surgeons throughout Ukraine who we feel confident will be deciding the future of Ukrainian neurosurgery. These young men and women are driven and committed, speak English, and cease at every opportunity to learn modern techniques. Over the last three months, as we approach the completion of 40 major brain and spine operations with close to 10 different partners, we became ever more convinced for the need to develop a fellowship program in Ukraine to supplement the woefully inadequate training that most young neurosurgeons receive. We hope with time, we could apply for accreditation with the World Federation of Neurosurgery - and we feel confident that we see a way forward to achieving that goal. Looking forward to see you on November 4th, Mariya and Luke

"Ukraine should take advantage of world economic growth"

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"EU signs document on granting additional trade preferences to Ukraine"

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13 September, 2017

"Average salary in Ukraine grows by 21%"

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"Iran, Ukraine review developing economic ties"

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12 September, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine - education is a first step to a breakthrough I arrived in Ukraine two weeks ago. Unlike dozens of previous trips to Ukraine this one is very special. On all previous trips our main goal was to establish network and build infrastructure to support UGTI vision on economic development of Ukraine. But now I arrived with single goal to lunch UGTI operations in Ukraine. UGTI Inc is a “window in and out of Ukraine”. We are the mechanism that allows capital, technology and innovation to flow freely into Ukraine and out of Ukraine to the benefit of all. The atmosphere here (at least for me) is electrifying! My intuition tells me that there is a major breakthrough for all Ukrainians and its already underway. I am and my partner Aleks are honored to be able to play a role. Statement above in NO WAY discounting all of the obstacles still in place in Ukraine. There will be a great deal of hard work ahead. Ukrainians are ready for growth and will demand this during upcoming political season. But Ukraine is 1st again – country that is most attractive for investors. See below https://en.censor.net.ua/news/454272/ukraine_tops_the_list_of_most_attractive_investment_countries_for_fund_man agers_institutional_investor In order to facilitate and expedite this transformation EDUCATION is a must. So, as a first step of our implementation plan, we are lunching Master Class this October (will be hosted in all 22 regions within 6 months) in partnership with SFII and Sikorsky Challenge. Below is a description of 1 day, 8 hour interactive Master Class, with real life examples that will benefit individual looking to start a business and a season professional. I hope to see many of in the audience. Master Class Description Long time ago Charles Darwin said: “It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change.” This is an absolute true in the world of entrepreneurs today and it will become even truer in the future. One-day Master Class is created for an audiences who is fully committed to succeed in business. The Master Class is designed to provide overview and introduction to most critical elements of the business irrespective of its current development stage. 1) Start-Up and Innovation – individuals who are contemplating becoming entrepreneur and the ones who already made a GIGANTIC step to transform their Idea to Reality. Apprenticeships are a phenomenal opportunity to achieve this. It is an ultimate model for work-based learning and a fantastic gateway to opportunities in the business world. Working with local industries, global organizations and entrepreneurs, students develop a rounded skill set that means they can hit the ground running when they enter the real world – whether that's as entrepreneurs in their own right or whether they choose to start their career in an existing business. Apprentices can extract the most value from an apprenticeship by being exposed to several businesses and sectors during their apprenticeship term. 2) Taking Business to next Level – building business model to scale Over 300 years ago Galileo said: “You can not teach man anything; you can only help him to find it within himself”.Over 90% of small and medium size businesses underutilize their potential. For majority, the reasons are:of clearly defined long-term strategy, business model that has no chance to scale and operations that depend not on systems but on specific individuals. In this course, students will be given a roadmap of how to transform their business into fast growing and high margin enterprise.“We can not be content with status quo. Any business today that embraces the status quo as an operating principle is going to be on the death march” Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks. 3) Sales, Customer Service & Marketing Everything in life is Sales. People just do not see it this way. John D. Rockefeller said that “The ability to deal with people is as purchasable commodity as sugar or coffee. And I will pay more for this ability, then any other under the sun”. Define key success drivers; develop your people and drive business outcomes. Sounds very simple but there is science behind it. Regardless of how brilliant product is or how critical your service is, without sales there is no business. In this course students will learn in-depth Discovering Markets to Sell into, Executive Sales Skills, Professional Sales Management, Successful Negotiations, Client Development, Selling Process, Presenting Solutions to buying team, Recruiting Sales People, Building Sales Team and creating Customer Focused culture throughout organization. 4) Executive Leadership for 21st Century According to John Wooden, a legendary basketball coach: “body, mind and emotions of the leader - all must be balanced in order to build and lead a successful organization”. We will develop skills in areas such as communication, data-driven decision-making, developing and supporting talent, leadership, strategic management, project management, and supporting and fostering stewardship of an organization’s culture and brand. You’ll learn through a combination of theoretical course work and practical applications.

"YES Forum will be held in Mystetsky Arsenal in Kyiv"

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"Ukraine, Canada start creating contract and legal base for developing cooperation in aerospace area"

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11 September, 2017

"Ukraine’s exports to Iran grew by almost 80%"

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"Turkish govt cuts import duties on Ukrainian agricultural goods"

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9 September, 2017

"Westinghouse, Polenergia, EDF want to participate in Ukraine-EU Energy Bridge project"

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"Port industry in Ukraine is most promising in terms of concession contracts - EBRD"

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8 September, 2017

"U.S. Greenbrier wants to order about 10,000 wagons in Ukraine with maximum localization of production"

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"Holtec International intends to produce small modular reactors in Ukraine"

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7 September, 2017
PAVEL HRANOVSKIY PR support, development of marketing strategies, design of materials for outdoor media Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook SFII Press release Kyiv, Ukraine, the lobby of Hyatt Regency Hotel. Large numbers of people at the entrance to the conference hall make it clear that there is a big business event. The attendance of security guard near the windows hints that Ukraine’s political elites are present at this event. In a matter of hours, on the runway of the panel discussion of Forum will come out the person, who in his own words and messages will make some young people who are wearing the brand suit to turn on the recorder and make notes. This man is Volodymyr Stavniuk, the chairman of the board of the State Finance Institution for Innovations. This Institution is unique by the nature of its activity. And this is not just a matter of words. You may judge. The Institution is the only one of the hundreds of the public organizations that can attract foreign investment for the implementation of the innovative project. Without bureaucratic acrimony, without various kinds of checks and restrictions, the top management just says – if you want to invest in Ukraine with the guarantee of success - come to us. The atmosphere of understanding and trust that comes from the speech of the chairman of the board reinforces the general provisions of the Institution that spelled out in its Charter. “Our door is open for investors from all over the world. We believe that the ideas of our compatriots and government’s earnest desire to carry out the reforms are multiplied by the desire of foreign investor to secure profits in a short space of time will become the synergistic impetus and historical choice for Ukraine and many generations of Ukrainian,” said Volodymyr Stavniuk. The investors from China and Korea were the first who supported this formula. Ukraine was and remains the territory which despite the political problems has several advantages, including the progressive developments of scientists and resource base. The lack of the strict regulation in the sphere of ІТ, infrastructure and agribusiness play the important role. A number of agreements have been concluded with such giants as CNTIK, AVIC, CPCG and this confirms the success of this formula. “We are ready to start the work as soon as possible because we believe in the Ukrainian projects and prospects which are opened before us. The another argument for our confidence is the vision of seriousness of intentions towards the foreign investors from Ukraine,” stated Zhang Hao, Green Bond Investment. Let’s go back to realities. Ukraine, despite the declarative intentions, may be virtually the first European “tiger” but remains the country with the post-Soviet syndrome. To feel this is quite simple – go to any regional or district center, and find the Regional State Administration and ask to meet with the head of the region. Obviously, you won’t take that answer. Anyone who tried to do business in the Ukrainian regions knows that the lack of professionalism, unpunctuality, the incompetence of certain officials kill any desire to invest in the most promising Ukrainian projects. What does SFII do? As the State Institution, it can appeal directly to the local authority and also can have the impact on their decisions. Being a mediator and guarantor between the foreign investors and business owner, the specialists of this Institution on simplification and purification processes of investment act as lobbyists for investors. The project developer for the wireless power transmission Mykhailo is surfing e-mail when the clock on the laptop reflects 3:00 a.m. The energy to find the investor for his project adds him the belief that the project can become revolutionary and can turn the whole market, which operates today through electric power. You can fasten your eyes on the slogan of the organization’s website which sounds like “Engine of the Ukrainian economy.” Mykhailo intuitively understands that such Institution can be the real opportunity to find the foreign investment for his ideas. Why not? The foreign investors should be interested in Ukraine as the market where is profitable to invest – cheap resources, low-cost labor, educated people. On the other hand the state needs theses fund; finally, who else, other that the foreign business may provide the investment infusion in the economy. The puzzle came together, it makes perfect sense. Andriy Dubas, the head of the Project Finance Department says: “The creation of the project submission portal from the Ukrainian developers wasn’t the goal in itself for our institution. It’s probably the imperative of our time. The leading investment banks want to have the full information about the domestic business and what does it can offer. All the know-how, systems of renewable energy, large infrastructure objects all these projects are sent to investors from around the world. Time is the resource and the bankers set the high value on time, and we understand this.” The State Finance Institution for Innovations is the mediator in the finest sense of this word which combines investor and project owner. Have you ever seen how does Sting’s concert organizer work? By setting the goal to make a show he makes the monumental efforts that performers and audience being fully satisfied. He doesn’t have room for error or imbalance in the relationship because the confidence of both parties to him creates the dual responsibility.To say that this institution is Sting’s concert organizer in the world of investments will be not entirely correct. It can not only act as the syndicator of business development in Ukraine but also act as the necessary partner. The possibility to act as a co-investor with the share of 10% of the total amount of investments is the good sign from Ukraine as the State isn’t it?

"Government approves use of ProZorro.Sales for state assets sale"

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"EU share of Ukraine’s foreign trade reaches 40% "

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6 September, 2017

"Ukraine tops the list of most attractive investment countries for fund managers, - Institutional Investor"

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"HackIT 2017 forum winners to be in Ukroboronprom’s Cyber Guard creating national Cyber Security Center"

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5 September, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Join us for Dentons Global Public Procurement Insights Webinar: Ukraine On September 28, 2017 at noon Eastern I am thrilled to join Members of Dentons' global Public Procurement team to discuss Ukraine's business climate, and opportunities and challenges for US and other foreign companies doing business or interested in doing business there. Also on the agenda will be how to effectively navigate the country's political and security landscape. To join us please RSVP at the following link: https://insights.dentons.com/236/2961/landing-pages/rsvp-blank.asp?sid=2449f116-c943-429a-a8a0-9adbc5ed162c --- Thursday, September 28, 2017 12 p.m. ET Webinar

"Legalization of cryptocurrencies would be a ‘quantum leap’ for Ukraine, expert believes"

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"Ukroboronprom presents new light aircraft"

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4 September, 2017

"U.S. provide largest financing of donor projects in Ukraine in H1 2017"

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"Investment Forum to be held in Kyiv in late September"

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2 September, 2017

"Ukraine likely to get IMF tranche following next EFF revision - Morgan Stanley"

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"Ukroboronprom presents new Ukrainian weapons"

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1 September, 2017

"Ukraine-EU Association Agreement enters fully into force"

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"IMF mission to arrive in Ukraine on September 12"

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31 August, 2017
PAVEL KRAVCHENKO Founder of Distributed Lab Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Know Your Tokens: Not All Crypto Assets Are Created Equal What we understand by the term "token" is actually best defined as the balance of some kind of account. But, perhaps most importantly, it's a balance that can really mean anything its founder wants it to mean. To date, tokens have been made to represent a user's reputation within a system (augur), a deposit in US dollars (tether), the quantity of files that are saved in it (filecoin) and the balance in some internal currency system (bitcoin). Because of this, I sometimes argue that tokens don't even exist – mostly, because I want to draw attention to the fact that they always have a very specific meaning. If we want an analogy, tokens can turn everything that we're used to seeing in paper form – including shares, and money and promissory notes – digital. But the terms we will use for these things will remain unchanged (shares will still be shares). The fact that crypto assets are stored in a decentralized accounting system, or require digital signatures, doesn't change their meaning or value. As such, the problem that is emerging isn't with the actual terms themselves, but that people have begun to assign attributes to tokens that they can't possibly have. There are people who claim that cryptocurrency tokens are something entirely new – and that projects that issue tokens can become amazingly transformed. Sadly, that's not the reality. Tokens and tokens In computer terminology, the term "token" has long meant one of two things: a gadget that can authorize a user (such as a dongle or a special thumb drive), or a fixed array of symbols that identify a user (such as an API key). In both situations, tokens can pass between different owners. So, how are cryptocurrencies different from the tokens we know? Generally, the term "crypto asset" means one of three different things: • A cryptocurrency with decentralized issuance and transactions. • A digital asset, issued into a decentralized system, and secured by either someone or something. This version can be split into two further subdivisions: either the accounting system isn't trusted; or the issuer isn't trusted. • Something that's both issued and validated by the same organization, yet not backed-up by anything. PayPal manages digital balances and transaction processing independently and non-transparently. This implies that its users must have implicit trust in PayPal, in order to be able to use its systems. Bitcoin handles processing and transaction processing entirely transparently, and in a completely decentralized way – because people would not trust an anonymous system under any other circumstances whatsoever. Tether handles processing entirely transparently (even better than the bitcoin network), but users must trust that it is faithfully issued (each token is 100% backed up by cash money on a bank account). Any centralized land registry demands that its users trust it in aspects of correctness of accounting – yet there are no issues on the question of issue (since new land can't be produced from thin air, and all land already exists). Types of tokens So what kinds of token are there? And how do they differ? A token can fulfil either one, or several of the following functions: • A currency, used as a payment system between participants. • A digital asset (a digital right – to land ownership, or tomatoes in a warehouse, and similar assets). • A means for accounting (number of API-calls, volume of torrent uploads). • A share (stake) in a specific start-up. • A way of rewarding main players (the best example is bitcoin). • A way of preventing attacks (such as commission within the bitcoin network). • Payment for using a system. Yet because there are so many options it may be hard to classify any particular token; they are often a cross between shares, an internal currency and accounting units. Tokens that are directly linked to shares in a company, for instance, don't need further consideration; they are completely identical to shares. More complex are so-called "utility tokens." Let's remember, this kind of token is used as way of making internal payments – yet their price can rise due to limitations in their issue, and due to rising demand. It's precisely due to this dual functionality that it's hard to define exactly what they are. Sometimes they behave on markets as though they are shares, yet regulators treat them as accounting units. Alongside this, people can sometimes use these to make payments to each other. The best definition for "utility tokens" is the one put forward by Vladimir Dubinin (my business partner). He compared the pre-sale of tokens with the sale of government bonds in US dollars. These bonds are denominated in the national currency, and profits from them will be paid out in that currency too. These bonds, it seems, will be sold at a heavy discount, but if they go well, the currency rate might rise quickly. In this light, we shouldn't forget that no nation whatsoever is keen to see its currency becoming too pricey because this leads to a sluggish economy and has a negative effect on the balance of payments. Questions for investors I'd say the main questions for investors are these: What does this token represent? Is it a share, an internal currency or an accounting unit? What would cause the value of this token to rise? Is it limited issue, or do you need to hold tokens to complete each transactions when using a product? What's the potential for growth? Does this product have potential to be needed by everyone on earth? Will the product remain in demand, say, if the token costs $1,000? In other words, couldn't the product's popularity become its own Achilles' heel? For example, if a transaction costs 1 token, at a price of $1,000, then would that be a reasonable and affordable price for users? Could that same product continue to exist without the tokens for it? Bitcoin, for example, couldn't function without the bitcoin token, yet Ripple could easily do so. In short, it's worth doing an analysis of this kind when looking at tokens as part of a long-term investment portfolio, rather than when buying with a view to speculating. My own personal feeling is that the market for crypto-assets remains rather overheated. It could be better to hold off the moment for getting into this market. Source: https://www.coindesk.com/what-is-token-really-not-all-crypto-assets-created-equal/

"Ukraine hopes to revive investment cooperation with U.S. - Groysman"

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"OPIC to support building wind power plants in Zaporizhia Region for $400 MLN"

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30 August, 2017

"Pivdenmash preparing new batch of engines for European Vega LV to ship them to partners"

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"Famous architect Romero from Romero-Slim family shows interest in Ukraine’s investment potential"

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29 August, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine is 1st but the best is ahead for the country Ukraine just celebrated it 26th birthday and on the same day I read a news story that placed Ukraine 1st in the world in the period between 1991 and 2017 – UKRAINE LOST 35% of its real GDP. Only 3 other countries had negative GDP growth during this period of time. Of course it nothing to be proud of. Victims of such terrible results are people of Ukraine. But we have a choice to make as individuals and organizations. We can choose to accept the last 26 years as what we should expect for the next quarter of a century or we can choose to look at the glass half full rather than half empty. In my humble opinion, I see a lot of things happening on the ground that I did not see in the previous 25 years. It makes me VERY optimistic about the future of my native country. First, Ukraine reached the bottom economically. We know all the ugly facts but we also start seeing early signs of turnaround in general economic numbers. Any professional trader will tell you that the best time to buy is during the reversal of a downtrend into uptrend. Ukraine is turning this corner. It is time to put a buy rating on Ukraine. Second, enormous attention United States is paying to Ukraine (for wide range of reasons) will turn in to dollars invested into the country, US corporations will be setting up manufacturing in Ukraine to capture lower cost, high quality of human resource and favorable geographic location. Cooperation in areas of cybersecurity and energy will make economic relationship between the countries much more fruitful financially than in the past. Third, China also will play a major role in the economic growth of Ukraine. It needs Ukraine not only as a new market to sell its goods into but as a manufacturing base to sell into EU and to capture innovation coming out from brains of Ukrainian engineers and scientists. In upcoming trade war with United States, Ukraine will become more important for China in years to come. Fourth, I started to see a real change in behavior of government officials. New generation is entering the halls of power. The generation that wants to see the country succeed. The generation that is tired rules of the old guard. No questions that there is a long way to go. There is still too much of: “this how we always done it”; too much of bureaucracy and unnecessary paperwork; lack of proper compensation for government employees; not enough education of proper way of governance and lack of quality leadership. But I think we are observing beginning of a major government transformation trend. I hope that in 5 years from now all Ukrainian will be proud of the job elected officials are doing. Fifth, in my opinion is most important trend. Ukraine within next 5-10 years can erase all of the losses of 26 years by getting TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION right. Our team identified scientific fields of 21st century that will allow Ukraine to transform its economy. Blockchain, nano or space technologies (and many others) give Ukraine a real chance at leadership in the world. Our team is prepared to lead this transformation www.ukraineil.com. We are building ecosystems to support Innovation, Start up and SME. In conclusion, if you add all natural resources country has to it intellectual potential and capacity, we can see country grow its GDP by 10% annually for foreseeable future. So, despite Ukraine 1st place in the race in which no one wants to be first, I am VERY optimistic about country’s future. I hope you will join our team in making Ukraine’s potential a reality!

"GOVT to foresee UAH 1 bln to support farmers in draft state budget for 2018 – Groysman"

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"Hong Kong interested in Ukrainian chocolate"

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28 August, 2017

"Moody’s upgrades Ukraine’s credit rating to CAA2 with ‘POSITIVE’ outlook"

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"Ukraine needs to raise competitiveness in domestic and foreign markets, develop start-ups – U.S. Ambassador"

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26 August, 2017

"EU to give Ukraine EUR 100 million for energy efficiency"

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"ProZorro system already saved about UAH 30 bln of budget funds – Kubiv"

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25 August, 2017

"Ukraine to lodge lawsuit with WTO against Russia over agricultural products by end of 2017"

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"Moody's upgrades Ukraine's credit rating to Caa2 with 'positive' outlook"

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24 August, 2017
IVAN CHAIKA Business Start-up Consultant, Summer 2017 Extern for the U.S.-Ukraine Foundation Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukrainian Drones: In Business and at War Introduction The United States provides one of the best environments for effectively commercializing new technologies. This is due to the Triple Helix Model of university-industry-government relationships , access to investment resources for business development, and appropriate industry regulation. In the context of Ukraine and as it relates to drone technology, the percentage of Ukrainian businesses that use drone technology in their manufacturing is below 10% . This was because of a disconnect between university research and commercial needs. This has resulted in weak property protection rights for investors and ineffective state governance. For a long time, Ukraine has generally produced and exported low added value products such as agriculture, chemicals, and metals. The prioritization of these industries meant slow development in the technology industry. As a result, intellectual property law, business protections, venture capital, and technology transfer was not a priority and, therefore, not enforced. However, in the past three years, this situation has dramatically changed. Two major events--the Revolution of Dignity and Russian invasion into Ukraine--have accelerated reforms in the police force, the energy sector, the healthcare system, the judicial system, and against corruption in politics. Within two years, Ukraine succeeded in becoming energy-independent from Russia by diversifying its suppliers. This kind of progress contributed to the launch of startups like Ecoisme , a tech company that monitors and optimizes energy use for private homeowners. Recently, this successful company signed a contract with the government of United Arab Emirates to work on its national energy efficiency program. Despite the only partial success of the above-mentioned reforms, Ukraine pushes forward with economic development. According to the European Business Association, Ukraine now boasts a higher investment attractiveness level than it has in six years. I. Drones in Practice Ukraine has a history of developing drone technology, but the importance of this industry was highlighted only 3 years ago. In the first months of the Russian-Ukrainian war, the Russian army showed how effectively military drones can be used on the frontlines. The Ukrainian army was not equipped with drones, hence volunteers created drone units wherein civil operators adjusted artillery launches and made intelligence flights. Successes here produced a broader awareness in the country about drones and drone technology. As a result, several public spheres decided to use drones in their work. a) Military Industry The Ukrainian defense industry can use drones to increase security for soldiers and to test tactical scenarios. However, because of high prices and importation complications, the Ministry of Defense, namely the Ukrainian state-owned concern Ukroboronprom, moved to increase national drone production. That began the process of corporatization . In 2015, Antonov company , started working with Polish WB Electronics on producing unmanned aircraft complexes, including those for combat. At the same time, private drone producers started pushing for state orders. Still, Ukraine is not able to provide hundreds of needed drones to its military units. Therefore, the US Department of Defense provided 72 drones to the Ukrainian military under the European Reassurance Initiative (ERI) program. For years, Ukraine has been a top-10 world exporter of weapons by selling its Soviet-era arsenal and new domestic weapons developments. Today, profits from these activities are funneled increasingly into the Ukrainian armed forces. However, after satisfying the frontline demand, Ukraine has an opportunity to open a new chapter in drone trade through the export of drones. Israel is a prime example of a nation successfully developing into an advanced technological power during wartime. Israel started with military drones and then became a world leader in producing civil drones. b) Agriculture As a strong player in the agriculture sector and possessing about one third of the world's fertile black soil , Ukraine can increase agricultural potential by using drones in their companies' business processes. In 2016, one of the most successful drone companies, Drone.Ua , used more than 1000 drones to provide a broad range of services to its clients in agriculture: measuring and monitoring fields, quality control of soil cultivation and sowing, analyzing seedling losses, and much more. Drone.Ua surveys 10% of Ukrainian fields (about 3 million square meters). Recently, the company launched in the EU market and received $4.7 million in investment for future business development. Also, Kray , another Ukrainian drone company specializing in agricultural aviation, signed contracts with farms in the United States and Canada. c) Other Interesting Fields Drones can be especially useful in logistics. In 2015, a successful Ukrainian logistics company, Nova Poshta , began testing on drone mail delivery. In Switzerland , drones were used to deliver packages as part of a pilot project by Swiss Post. Amazon made its first successful deliveries via drone in December, 2016. Ultimately, drones can be used in many areas: for mapping, protecting natural resources, personal entertainment, municipal services, media, and security. II. Current Regulation of Drones in Ukraine Drone use, or "unmanned aerial vehicles " (UAVs) as they are officially designated in current legislation , is not specifically regulated. They are within a broad group of civil and commercial aircraft, according to airspace regulation. No official regulatory documents exist regarding UAV flight, certification, attestation of operators, or integration into air traffic management. " Unmanned aerial vehicle " is defined as any aircraft intended to fly without a pilot on board. These vehicles are controlled by a special control station not located onboard the vehicle. Drones weighing less than 20 kilograms do not require registration or flight clearance from state agencies. Moreover, there is no restriction on using drones in cities for private purposes, except in restricted areas. Such regulation is outdated and doesn't meet the current needs of the drone industry. Therefore, the Ukrainian government recently started adopting new drone legislation. III. Recent Legislative Improvements The State Aviation Administration of Ukraine prepared general guidelines and provided recommendations on the use of drones In August 2016. These regulations are similar to the European Aviation Safety Agency 's and United Kingdom 's guidelines. The provisions determine the rights and limitations for drone operators. For example, drone operators are encouraged to respect privacy by keeping a distance of 50 meters away from people and property, avoid flights of over 100 meters, be aware of security provisions, complete pre-flight inspection of UAVs, keep UAVs within visual range at all times, and refrain from flying in bad weather conditions. Additionally, drones are not allowed within 5 kilometers of airports, restricted areas, or dangerous areas; to fly above vehicles, city streets, or crowds; or to be affixed with any additional items that are not part of the original design. However, these rules are only recommendations and, therefore, not enforceable. Taking into account current international practices, these conditions will likely be used as the basis for the new legislation being drafted at this moment. The State Aviation Administration of Ukraine published the draft of conceptual provisions and procedures for the safe use of UAVs in May 2016. The process for regulation implementation was affected by two significant factors. First, Ukraine did not have to contend with an overwhelming amount of uncontrolled drones, like in the U.S., therefore, progress in establishing modern regulations for drones was not considered urgent. At the same time, military conflict in the east and the needs of the agriculture industry placed pressure on legislators to come up with good regulations for the use of drones. Unclear regulation postpones industry development and could pose danger to the community. Last month, Ukrainian Avia Service presented a drone regulation draft for public discussion. The agency proposed four drone classifications: - 0-th class - up to 250 g (no registration, but the pilot must comply with the rules of use) - 1st class - from 250 grams to 20 kg (for non-commercial use - online registration, for commercial - the pilot must be trained and receive a certificate) - 2nd class - from 20 kg to 150 kg (all pilots must pass the training and receive a certificate) - 3rd class - over 150 kg (in accordance to the regulation of aircraft vessels) These kinds of classifications are quite common around the world today, including in the U.S. Generally speaking, we welcome the regulation of drones in Ukraine. Future regulations will provide clear rules in a market that will allow businesses to plan successful strategies. Due to the unique demands of the war and the development of agriculture, the drone industry can play an important role in domestic development and continue to increase sales in the global market. Ivan Chaika is a Business Start-up Consultant and a Summer 2017 Extern for the U.S.-Ukraine Foundation. Mr. Chaika received a LL.M. in Intellectual Property Law from the University of New Hampshire School of Law this past May. He has previously worked for a leading regional law company, as a legislative assistant at the Parliament of Ukraine, and as a research assistant at the Research Institute of Legal Provision of Innovation Development. He also serves as the "Ukraine Ambassador" in the U.S. for the Professional Government Association of Ukraine. Mr. Chaika can be reached at email: mr.ivan.chaika@gmail.com. Edited by Olivia Brinich, a Summer 2017 Intern at the U.S.-Ukraine Foundation. Ms. Brinich is attending Washington University in St. Louis and majoring in International Affairs. Source: http://myemail.constantcontact.com/SPECIAL-SUMMER-ISSUE.html?soid=1100917358001&aid=RbiC3-DBNT0

"Ukrainian exports to Canada 76% up in Jan-June 2017 - Mykolska"

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"Armed Forces got UAH 22 bln more this year - Groysman"

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23 August, 2017

"Ukrainian companies to participate in international Asia Fruit Logistica 2017"

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"Scania Ukraine sells another 15 vehicles to Nibulon"

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22 August, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Letter from UGTI founder Today is an important day for UGTI because after nearly 30 years in the United States my UGTI co-founder, partner and friend Henry Shterenberg is moving to Kyiv, Ukraine, the city of birth, to advance our shared vision. Henry, thank you for your vision, tenacity, talent, boundless energy and belief in Ukraine and its people. To mark your journey, I thought it would be appropriate to share with you, our readers and our colleagues text of the first UGTI Executive Summary we wrote together one year ago. Reading the unedited excerpt copied below was satisfying beyond description. Our progress and daily work together proves, beyond doubt, that although we set the bar high, it is within reach. Thank you for being my friend. Thank you for being my partner. Доброго Вітру! Ukraine Global Trade & Investor, Inc. (“UGTI”) was founded to become a transparent, efficient and powerful driver of sustainable economic growth and development in Ukraine by aligning the economic interests of Ukrainian businesses with those of Western counterparts through trade and investment. Ukraine is awash in undervalued opportunities for trade, partnership and investment across industries at the heart of the global economy including agriculture, aerospace, defense, heavy industry, manufacturing and IT. These established industries in Ukraine have room to grow thanks to a young and educated population, the lowest labor costs in Europe and conditions favorable to trade. Realizing this growth is challenging because despite 25 years of effort the Ukrainian economy is poorly integrated with the West and mistrust characterizes the relationship between the majority of Ukrainian and Western businesses more than understanding. The impact of this inability to integrate and failure to communicate began to be felt most acutely after former President Yanukovych, citing pressure from Russia, refused to sign Ukraine’s EU Association Agreement. Rather than accept a turn away from the West, Ukrainians rejected dominion from Moscow. A trade war with Russia, Ukraine’s largest trading partner, was among the economic consequences of this decision. Exports to Russia shrank by 36.2% in the first half of 2016, a decrease amplified by the fact that Ukrainian businesses have struggled to offset losses with sales to new customers in the West. As for imports, there is significant unmet demand in key industries where Ukraine seeks to reduce or eliminate reliance on Russian-supplied goods. UGTI will stimulate trade and investment with Ukraine by stepping in to the void between Ukrainian and Western companies to identify, evaluate, de-risk and facilitate deals across key sectors of Ukraine’s economy. This ambitious goal is within reach because for the first time in the quarter century since Ukraine’s independence substantially all levels of Ukrainian society, business and government are oriented west and motivated by self-interest to integrate. For many Ukrainian businesses integrating means learning to sell to customers who are poorly understood and live in countries where prior experience with Ukrainian businesses likely left a negative impression. This pivot would be difficult under any circumstances. Businesses in Ukraine are attempting it on the heels of a threefold devaluation in currency and while coping with lost Russian trade. If Western companies moved to fill the void left in Ukraine’s import or export markets they would find Ukrainian counterparties that are more (1) accommodating in negotiations, and (2) likely to honor contractual commitments than at any time in living memory. Unfortunately, these and other reasons to do business with Ukrainian companies today are overshadowed by the reputation for corruption they earned in the past. Lack of international interest or hesitation in respect to Ukraine is not irrational. Western companies and investors with no prior experience working in Ukraine or with Ukrainian companies assessed the opportunity and either decided against it or never considered it. All other things being equal, a company that decided against doing business with Ukraine in the past is unlikely to reconsider based solely on the perception of increased risk fostered by Russia’s annexation of Crimea and invasion and occupation of the Donbas. Western companies and investors active in Ukraine for any substantial period of time during the last 25 years understand it has great economic potential. The allure of that potential made tolerable the risk, uncertainty and often losses that came with doing business in Ukraine. These companies know the country and its business leaders well enough to appreciate that Ukraine today offers unique opportunity and real value. Unfortunately for Ukraine, they may also stand more to gain by waiting. Ukraine’s unmet demand for new trade and investment partners created an opportunity for UGTI to develop a simple business model based on bridging the divide between Ukrainian and Western companies. In 2014 UGTI founders began meeting with Ukrainian business leaders to better understand the obstacles faced by their companies. As a result of these meetings, UGTI came to understand that a small core of determined and experienced professionals with support from subject matter experts in different industries could secure the right to represent, whether in sales or investment, nearly any company in Ukraine. Today, UGTI has a team of 100 professionals who are leaders in their fields and represents 60 Ukrainian companies across 12 industries. UGTI was successful in securing the right to represent leading companies in key Ukrainian industries because it had the experience to recognize an opportunity early and invested the time and resources to develop a platform that mitigates risks of doing business in Ukraine or with Ukrainian companies (“UGTI Platform”)…Each transaction concluded through the UGTI Platform will attract more business and establish UGTI as a transparent, efficient and powerful driver of sustainable economic growth and development in Ukraine. As a US company driving trade and investment in Ukraine, UGTI will peacefully promote stability in the region.

"Ukraine, Israel plan to agree all issues on FTA in coming months"

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"Ukrainian startup DMarket selling in-virtual game items raises some $11.5 mln at first ICO phase"

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21 August, 2017

"GOVT approves bill introducing European standards for construction materials in Ukraine"

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"Ukraine interested in deepening cooperation with Sudan"

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19 August, 2017

"Poroshenko to meet with U.S. Secretary of Defense on Independence Day"

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"Germany provides additional humanitarian aid to Ukraine in amount of EUR 1 million"

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18 August, 2017

"UDP to build 300 MW power plants on renewable sources in next five years"

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"Ukraine central bank warns of new cyber-attack risk"

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17 August, 2017
TETYANA TYSHCHUK iMoRe project manager and editor UGTI on Facebook Train “Ukraine – Future”: In Which Direction Did the Country Move in the Second Quarter of 2017? In the second quarter of 2017, the reforms continued to slow down, while the average Index for Monitoring of Reforms (iMoRe) was the lowest for the entire monitoring period since early 2015 (+0.6 points). The greatest progress was observed in the areas of “deregulation,” “fighting corruption,” and “efficiency of public expenditures.” Among the important regulatory acts of this quarter are the laws on the electricity market, compulsory redemption and sale of shares, and the autonomization of healthcare establishments. More than two and a half years ago, the coalition of deputy factions “European Ukraine” made an agreement, having committed itself to reforming the country. In a month and a half, the President formally set the priorities of the reforms in the Ukraine 2020 strategy. The directions of reforms are also defined in the documents signed with the international partners – the IMF (1, 2, 3, 4), the EU (1, 2, 3), and the World Bank (1, 2). How are the reforms progressing and which aspects have shown improvements recently? VoxUkraine starts to publishing quarterly reviews of the reforms. This publication focuses on the key legislative changes made by the government in the second quarter of 2017. The rate of reformist legislative changes has been slowing down recently (graph 1). In the second quarter of 2017, the average Іndex for Monitoring of Reforms (iMoRe) was the lowest for the entire monitoring period since early 2015 (+0.6 points). The greatest progress in the second quarter of 2017 was observed in the area of “deregulation”: the total iMoRe index in this area is twice higher than in the spheres ranking second and third – “fighting corruption” and “efficiency of public expenditures” respectively Major reformist regulatory acts in the second quarter of 2017 1. Law on the electricity market (2019-VIII). The document determines a new market model. It should create opportunities for the development of competition and, as a result, for the free choice of electricity suppliers by final consumers. “Adoption of this law has marked the end of the first wave of implementation of the Third Energy Package of the EU at the level of basic laws,” says Roman Nitsovych, Dixi Group. “From a technical point of view, this law is of high quality, because experts from the EU structures and the Secretariat of the Energy Community have taken part in its development. The fundamental philosophy of the law is to launch liberalization of wholesale and retail electricity markets, which should result in the transition to market pricing rules, the protection of consumer rights, and the creation of conditions for the competition in the sphere of electricity supply.” Natalia Boyko, Deputy Minister of Energy and Coal Industry, saidthat the law provides for the “transitional” period (24 months from the date of entry into force). During this period, the necessary technical, organizational, economic and regulatory prerequisites for the introduction and smooth operation of the market must be created. Over this period, the Ministry of Energy and the National Commission for Energy and Utilities Regulation shall prepare more than 100 subordinate legislative acts. 2. Law on compulsory redemption and sale of shares(№1983-VIII). The law harmonizes certain corporate management standards in joint-stock companies with the EU documents. MP Viktoria Ptashnyk explained that the law is part of the corporate management reform (along with the law on corporate contracts which was already adopted and the draft law on limited liability companies). It lays down a basis for civilized relations in joint-stock companies. According to Maksym Libanov from the National Securities and Stock Market Commission, the law has introduced a number of corporate management mechanisms. In particular: • a squeeze-out mechanism which provides for the right of a shareholder who (directly or indirectly) owns the controlling interest (95% of the shares) to redeem shares of other shareholders in a compulsory manner, • a sell-out mechanism which provides for the right of a minority shareholder (less than 5%) to sell their shares to a shareholder who owns 95% of the company in a compulsory manner, • a mandatory bid mechanism which establishes the obligation of the shareholder who acquired the controlling interest (50% + 1 share) or the substantial shareholding (75% of shares) to offer other shareholders to sell their shares, • a simplified mechanism for the transformation of public joint-stock companies into private companies or limited liability companies, which does not require that permits be reissued after such a transformation. A squeeze-out mechanism allows to redeem shares from those shareholders who do not have any influence on the company’s activities, yet, nevertheless, the company incurs significant expenses to inform these shareholders about the general meetings, payment of dividends, etc, said Denys Sakva from Dragon Capital. “The law contains three blocks of changes important for businesses – introduction of escrow accounts, changes in the procedure for pledging money in bank accounts, and the redemption of shares of minority shareholders,” says Zoya Mylovanova, VoxUkraine Law. “Thus, the legislator has removed one of the obstacles that, along with currency risks, restrictions on the withdrawal of capital, and others, forced even bona fide owners willing to pay taxes to formalize the sale of large businesses outside Ukraine.” 3. w on the autonomization of healthcare establishments (2002-VIII). The law allows to reorganize healthcare establishments from budgetary institutions into non-profit enterprises. Such opportunities have existed before, but the procedures were too complicated. The adopted law simplifies the reorganization and introduces new mechanisms of managing such enterprises. “According to the law, healthcare establishments shall become similar in status to any other enterprise,” explains Pavlo Kovtoniuk, Deputy Minister of Healthcare. “So far, due to vertical management they have been functioning as budgetary institutions in line with the Soviet standards.” Their managers had no freedom of action and were guided by the top-down instructions in the form of orders and decrees. The law introduces a concept of a “healthcare service” which allows to receive funds from any source of financing in a legitimate and transparent manner, to select the heads of healthcare establishments through competition, and to set up supervisory boards and boards of trustees. The autonomization of healthcare establishments has been made voluntary – as a compromise at the request of the specialized committee of the Verkhovna Rada. “Those healthcare establishments that decide to become non-profit enterprises will receive preferential terms for reorganization. Mandatory assessment of property which is usually required in case of reorganization will no longer be necessary. These enterprises will become successors to all the rights and obligations of the relevant budgetary institutions,” said MP Iryna Sysoyenko. “A new form of management opens up many opportunities for a healthcare establishment,” says Yaroslav Kudlatskyi, Kyiv School of Economics, “from changing the organizational structure to attracting new sources of funding other than governmental funds. The hospitals will finally be able to decide independently which services or equipment to order. This should make provision of medical care more economically efficient and improve the quality of services.” Gloomy outlook A number of draft laws are yet to be signed by the President. Once they are signed, it might influence the iMoRe dynamics in the third quarter of 2017. Further progress will greatly depend on the parliament’s ability to shape the necessary legislative preconditions for the reforms in the spheres of healthcare, the pension system, the land market, privatization, and the reboot of the civil service. Given the fact that the last plenary meeting of the current (sixth) session was held on July 14 and the next one will take place in September after the vacations, it will not be easy to find the necessary time and adopt the laws important for these reforms during the third quarter. --- Source: https://voxukraine.org/2017/07/20/train-ukraine-future-in-which-direction-did-the-country-move-in-the-second-quarter-of-2017/

"Ukraine opens beneficial ownership database"

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"Number of unemployed in Ukraine decreased by 14% for a year - State Statistics Service"

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16 August, 2017

"Germans interested in investing in alternative energy development in Ukraine"

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"Ukrsadprom and U.S. Embassy prepare report on business prospects of fruits and vegetables production in Ukraine"

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15 August, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine Re-Invented Ukraine is about to celebrate 26 years of independence. This period was marked by major criminal activity, high inflation, looting of the treasury and state assets, systematic corruption, unstable currency, two revolutions and failure of the banking system. The annexation of Crimea and a proxy war by Russian Federation in the east of the country also blighted the country. During these turbulent years the only thing that kept the country from falling apart was the unrelenting struggle of the Ukrainian people for democracy, independence and economic prosperity. It is our view that current years will be remembered in history, as time when Ukraine started a long awaited turnaround to reach its full potential and become a major economic power on the world stage. Here is why: 1. Economic Growth Potential Numbers tell the story. In 2015 Ukraine’s GDP was 3 times less than in Poland and 10 times less than in Germany. GDP per capita in Ukraine was 6 times less than per Polish citizen and 20 times less per German citizens. Yet, Ukraine’s territory is almost twice as big as either Germany or Poland. It is my view that execution of the strategy outlined in this document will lead to $700-billion-dollar expansion of Ukraine’s GDP and 3x times increase in income per capita income in the next decade. 2. Human Resource Ukraine has one of the most educated labor forces in the world. Ukraine’s human resource is the most undervalued asset of the country. Ukraine’s demographics tells us that 40% of population is under 40. The young people of Ukraine are smart, ambitious and willing to learn. Most all citizens of Ukraine are seeking an opportunity to work hard, transparently, efficiently and profitably. They need a vision and will from the leaders of Ukraine. 3. Asset Value Across the Ukrainian economy assets of all classes and types are at the lowest level in their short history. The majority of infrastructure requires massive investment but also offers great opportunity to earn outsized returns on capital. Company valuations are extremely low in comparison to similar companies in the west. Ukrainian cost of labor is one of the lowest in the world. Tens of billions of dollars could be made practically in every sector of the economy in the next decade. 4. Geographic Location Ukraine’s location is extremely strategic. Within easy reach of the EU, Asia, Middle East and Africa, Ukraine has the potential to become a leader in global distribution. --- Ukraine’s brand and image needs a MAJOR MAKEOVER to achieve its economic goals. UGTI Inc. proposes 5 areas that must become cornerstone of Ukraine’s image in the world. Organic Today Ukraine has an opportunity to become a leading ORGANIC exporter. During Soviet times, the Republic of Ukraine was known as the “breadbasket” of Europe. It could become known as a leading ORGANIC country in the new world order. Ukraine’s massive potential in agricultural sector will be only magnified by organic certification. It will drive 20% to 40% higher margins (depending on the crop) to the benefit of Ukrainian farmers. Multinationals of all types from Walmart on down are struggling to fulfill the demand for organic food by populations worldwide. Ukraine has an opportunity to fulfill this need and attract massive investment in Agro sector. “Organic Ukraine” in addition to being massive economic driver, will also serve as a great differentiator in the global marketplace. It will add enormous value to brand UKRAINE. Brain Power One of the things Communism did right for its people was to instill great deal pride in their education. This trend continues to this day in every family in Ukraine. It is estimated that there is over $1 trillion of Intellectual Property developed by Ukrainians lying dormant and waiting for monetization. Further, the opportunity lies in utilization of this untapped human resource in the areas of science and engineering. These highly educated individuals earn on average of less than $15,000 per year in Ukraine vs $200,000 + equivalent level talent in the United States. It is an opportunity for savings for corporations, academic institutions and governments of the West, while simultaneously doubling or tripling income of Ukraine’s scientific and engineering community. Logistics Heaven It does not take a brilliant economist to realize what a valuable asset Ukraine’s geographic location is. Unfortunately, current situation related to the infrastructure in Ukraine does not allow it to take advantage of this significant asset. Yet, this also presents one of the greatest economic opportunities not only for the country but also for investors of all types. The country is in a desperate need to invest in roads, ports, airports, energy and industrial parks throughout the country. Today, simply due to bad roads, Ukraine is losing billions of dollars in economic activity. Lack of infrastructure adds additional negative element in consideration for FDI into the country. Instead of liability, Ukraine’s infrastructure should become one of the country’s major assets. UGTI Inc. believes based on the proven track record of infrastructure development in other countries dealing with the same challenge, the plan could be developed for specific implementation steps for the countrywide development and monetization of Ukraine’s infrastructure. BioMass production Superpower There is a major need in the world for biomass. Today, there are hundreds of technologies that convert something into a bio product. Unfortunately, there is simply not enough biomass production in the world today to meet fast growing demand posed by technologies. The facts are that industrial global biomass production remains in its infancy. Ukraine can be the first in the world to produce biomass on industrial and countrywide levels.Over 4,000,000 hectares of highly fertile land are not utilized in Ukraine today. Further, millions more hectares of land not suitable for edible crops are available to produce crops as biomass. After years of research, many recommend and predict that the crop Miscanthus will become the game changer for Ukraine and the world in biomass production. Global Destination Ukraine’s potential in Hospitality and Tourism offers an opportunity to become a world-class destination. The country can offer great value to tourists in areas of nature, history, religion, education, art, sports, entertainment, science and natural medicine 12 months per year. From the Ukraine’s brand standpoint of view, it is a low hanging fruit. In my humble opinion Ukraine represents one the BEST GLOBAL opportunities for outsides returns for the next decade. But for the industry to become a major economic driver for the country, the Ukrainian government must heavily invest in the infrastructure throughout the country and promotion of Ukraine as a destination worldwide. In comparison to many other destinations in the world, Ukraine offers a great deal of value for every dollar spent. The cost of hotels, food and entertainment are significantly lower for the value received in comparison to most global destinations. Further, due to a very low asset value, it offers great investor opportunity for multinational developers and operators at this time and for decades to come. It is my belief that now is high time to invest in Hospitality and Tourism industry of Ukraine

"EBRD mulling opportunities to develop hryvnia-pegged crediting, investment in Ukraine"

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"Ukraine boosts revenues for agricultural exports by $2 bln in H1"

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14 August, 2017

"Antonov State Enterprise seeks to pass FAA certification by late 2020, switch to NATO standards"

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"Germany investing $10 mln in development of small and medium enterprises in Ukraine"

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12 August, 2017

"Waste recycling plant to be built in Kharkiv Region – GOVT resolution"

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"Ukrainian government to renew cooperation with US in science and technologies"

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11 August, 2017

"Agrovesna 2011 berry cooperative seeking investor in building agroindustrial park in Kyiv region"

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"Ukraine’s GOVT wants to introduce single account for taxpayers"

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10 August, 2017
KRZYSZTOF STANOWSKI Former president of Solidarity Fund PL UGTI on Facebook Poland’s Revolutionary Lessons for Ukraine In the last thirty years, Ukraine has undergone three revolutions: the Revolution on Granite (1990), the Orange Revolution (2004-2005), and the Revolution of Dignity (2013-2014)—each about different values. The first one was about the right to independence, the second about fair elections, and the third about the right to choose the country’s geopolitical direction. For Poles who planned and participated in the revolution of the 1980s, the key was to be ready for the window of opportunity—have an idea, clear demands, a plan for reforms, and ready leaders. On average, a country is presented with a chance for change every fifty years. Ukraine seems to be an exception and gets its chance every ten years. It took Poland several attempts to be more independent and prepared. Over the course of 124 years, Poland saw an uprising and unsuccessful attempt to return independence every thirty years. Each generation wanted this and was ready to do this. The Warsaw uprising of 1944, the Poznan 1956 protests, the student demonstrations of March 1968, the Polish 1970 protests, the 1976 workers’ protests, and the Solidarity strike of 1980—all these attempts prepared Poland for the right moment. Poland didn’t have one leader. Lech Wałęsa was a hero. There were many leaders, including deputies and deputy assistants. The latter were tasked with preparing to lead and continue the cause if the first two levels were arrested or killed. Such preparation should be based on teaching values and responsibility to the country. And when the time comes to make a change, it’s important to have many candidates for public service. In the preparation stage, self-education plays a critical role. Poland published nearly a thousand different weekly underground newspapers, even though someone caught working at one could be imprisoned for three years during martial law. This meant that censorship was ineffective. Poland had discussions about reforms five years prior to 1989. They were held in prisons, universities, and education clubs. That meant that at the moment of change, Poland was ready for reforms. When it’s time to implement reforms, it must be done quickly. The Balcerowicz plan was implemented in ninety days, while local self-government reform was done in 180 days after the formation of the first government. The implementation of reforms is critical in the first days because that’s when people are willing to make sacrifices. After Poles won the revolution, they didn’t return home but instead embarked upon reforms. Their next task was to make real changes at the local level. With reforms, the first ten years are the hardest because it’s not fully clear what impact they have. At a time when Moscow wants Ukraine to focus on war, Kyiv’s future depends on carrying out reforms. Otherwise, it will not only lose the opportunity presented by the last revolution, it will also jeopardize its independence. Ukraine’s path toward sustainable growth is through local self-government and education reform. It’s another philosophy of nation-building and another way of assuming responsibility for a community, instead of waiting for the central government to do everything. Decentralization is not only the most critical reform for Ukraine, but it’s the cheapest option. Without these reforms, Ukraine will always be waiting for a strong leader. If it doesn’t want to wait for the “good Tsar,” the only alternative is to transfer authority to local governments. In April-May 2014, constitutional decentralization seemed to have been within reach. Unfortunately, that didn’t happen. The two reforms that were implemented were amendments to tax and budget codes, which allocated funds to local authorities and unified territorial communities. Real changes are happening in Ukraine where there are unified communities. They have real authority, money, and make local policy. In more than forty cities across Ukraine, citizens are now more actively engaged thanks to the participatory budgeting mechanism; they get to vote on and submit various development projects. People need to have an opportunity to count the money, make decisions, and make mistakes along the way. But these will be their own mistakes, not the president’s, and they will learn from them. Only when people feel responsible and form unified communities in at least half of Ukraine can we say Ukraine’s reforms are irreversible. There is no need to convince people of the importance of having a strong local self-government. They understand it and are ready for it, but they have one condition: assurance that it’s the real deal and not a joke. The second important reform is education. A school is the first public institution where a relationship between the individual and the state is formed. People are willing to pay to improve the quality of education for their children. Poland drastically improved the quality of its education by transferring it to local self-government. Schools must become community cultural centers, be open to NGOs and parents, teach beyond the classroom walls, and have democratic procedures, including student self-government councils, parent-teacher associations, and teaching councils. In conclusion, the Polish local government reforms were successful because they were apolitical. The Polish cities had professional mayors, not politicians. Poland’s experience demonstrates the need to remove politics and party affiliation from municipal governance and find people ready to work as professionals without political ambitions. --- Krzysztof Stanowski is a former president of Solidarity Fund PL. He served as Under Secretary of State at the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs from 2010 to 2012 and Under Secretary of State at the Polish Ministry of National Education 2007 to 2010. Stanowski gave this lecture, “From Three Revolutions to a Stable Democracy in Ukraine,” at the Ukraine Crisis Media Center on May 29, 2017. This lecture was translated from Ukrainian into English and abridged and edited for clarity by Vera Zimmerman. --- Source: http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/blogs/ukrainealert/poland-s-revolutionary-lessons-for-ukraine

"Agriculture Ministry and Kyivstar will develop digital platform for farmers"

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"World Bank ready to use ProZorro to procure goods, services in Ukraine"

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9 August, 2017

"Qatar simplifies visa regime with 80 countries, including Ukraine"

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"Production of passenger cars in Ukraine 51% up in July 2017"

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8 August, 2017
ALEKS MEHRLE President of UGTI Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook The Cyber-Attack on Ukraine (Is America Next?) This week, something different. I would like to thank Gary Glennell Toms, creator and Managing Editor of this site and "The G-Man Interviews" (http://fromthegman.blogspot.com/) and former associate editor, reporter and columnist for "The Wave of Long Island" for taking the time to interview me about the recent cyberattacks on Ukraine and the need for and value of US-Ukraine cybersecurity cooperation. Mr. Toms broke stories that were later picked up by "The New York Times", "The Daily News" and "Newsday", among others. He has received numerous awards for journalism and community service. Have a listen: Foreword: http://fromthegman.blogspot.com/2017/07/the-cyber-attack-on-ukraine-is-america.html Interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3-XXrsefpo&feature=youtu.be

" International reserves of Ukraine have already grown by 15% this year"

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"France to assist Ukraine in building solar power stations in exclusion zone in Chornobyl"

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7 August, 2017

"Ukraine, Iran review agro-economic ties"

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"U.S. company to invest in gold mining in western Ukraine"

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5 August, 2017

"Ukraine repaid $450 million to the IMF"

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"Ukraine scheduled to install 150 Bitcoin ATMs in 2017"

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4 August, 2017

"Ukraine will be able to invest 50 bln in road repair in a year"

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"Energomashspetsstal ships two ROTORS for Indian Bhel’s turbine"

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3 August, 2017
CURTIS “BJ” BJELAJAC Executive Director at Science and Technology Center in Ukraine (STCU) UGTI on Facebook STCU History and Major Accomplishments The Science and Technology Center in Ukraine (STCU) is an intergovernmental organization dedicated to nonproliferation of technologies and expertise related to weapons of mass destruction, including nuclear, biological and chemical weapons, and their delivery systems. The STCU was the first intergovernmental organization in Ukraine and was established by an Agreement signed on 25 October 1993, by the four Founding Parties: Canada, Sweden, Ukraine, and the United States of America. The Agreement came into force on 4 May 1994, when Ukrainian President Kravchuk issued a decree accepting the STCU Agreement. The STCU became fully operational when it held its first Governing Board Meeting on 14-15 December 1995. Later, the European Union acceded to the STCU Agreement in November 1998, replacing Sweden as a Governing Party to the STCU Agreement. Over the years, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Moldova, and Uzbekistan joined STCU as member parties. Today, the STCU is headquartered in Kyiv and has field offices in Baku, Chisinau, and Tbilisi as well as in Kharkiv. Japan has also participated as a special sponsor of STCU projects. Since the first STCU Governing Board meeting in 1995, STCU has sponsored over 1,700 cooperative science research projects amounting to over $274 million (USD equiv.) in research grant funding to Ukrainian, Azerbaijani, Georgian, Moldovan, and Uzbek scientists. STCU has engaged nearly 21,000 scientists, of which approximately 12,000 were former weapon scientists during the Soviet era. From 1995 until today, STCU had awarded the following amounts of project funding to scientists and technicians in the STCU Recipient Parties: Azerbaijan = $7.0M (USD equivalent) Georgia = $16.6M (USD equivalent) Moldova = $3.2M (USD equivalent) Ukraine = $230.7M (USD equivalent) Uzbekistan = $16.5M (USD equivalent) Total Project Funding = $274.0M (USD equivalent) As part of its non-proliferation mission, the STCU has also connected these scientists to a wide variety of governmental- and non-governmental Partners. From 1995 until today, STCU has managed over $124 million USD equiv. in R&D projects sponsored by these external partners, including governmental programs and many American, Canadian, and European businesses. From 1995 until today, the total project funding contribution from STCU Funding Parties and other donors has been as follows: Canadian Government = $10.0 million (USD) European Commission = €49.5 million (Euros) Other European Government organizations = $7.8 million (USD equivalent) Japanese Government = $1.04 million (USD) Swedish Government = $1.67 million (USD) U.S. Government = $144.5 million (USD) All non-governmental and private sector partners = $47.0 million (USD). Why Work via the STCU? As you can see from the figures presented above, the STCU has a long, successful history of working with both government and non-government partners. The case for working via the STCU is clear, as you can see from the list of benefits outlined below: Guaranteed business security, reliability and confidentiality Clear and transparent financial operations Tax-free grants to scientists through their individual bank accounts Annual financial statement audits performed by Big Four accounting firm and available on STCU website Custom clearance assistance free of all duties and taxes Project auditing and monitoring, timely delivery of scientific reports and results Host government concurrence Professional Project Management Complete compliance with the legal systems of our member countries Knowledge of the scientific community and its capabilities Thorough understanding of local business practices Contact the STCU today and allow us to improve your Ukrainian R&D investment experience: - Elena Taberko STCU Senior Specialist - Tel: +380-44-490-7150 Fax: +380-44-490-7145 E-mail: elena.taberko@stcu.int Web site: www.stcu.int Address: 7a Metalistiv St. Kyiv, Ukraine 03057

"DTEK launches first solar power plant"

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"Envoy: Iran, Ukraine economic ties in post-JCPOA increases by 32%"

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2 August, 2017

"Vega LV powered by Ukrainian engine successfully puts two satellites into orbit"

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"Ukrteplo seeks to invest UAH 2.5 bln in biofuel CHPP, ethanol plant in Odesa region"

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1 August, 2017
HENRY SHTERENBERG CEO & Founder Follow me on Linkedin UGTI on Facebook Ukraine – a global leader in production of “GREEN OIL” We know the world is changing. We have invested tens of billions into a new BIO technologies of all kind to make human impact on the environment more sustainable. Me made a lot of progress. Not nearly enough but we are on the right track. One MAJOR problem to be solved – lack of biomass. With all these technologies converting something into bio product, one needs biomass to do it. Ukraine now has an opportunity to become a global leader in production of biomass. Our team would like to present to you a VERY unique crop that can do a job that help all of humanity. 1. About Miscanthus •Longevity - Miscanthus is planted in spring and once planted can remain in the ground for at least fifteen to twenty years. •Growth - New shoots emerge around March each year, growing rapidly in June-July, producing bamboo-like canes. The Miscanthus dies back in the autumn/winter, the leaves fall off, providing nutrients for the soil, and the canes are harvested in winter or early spring. This growth pattern is repeated every year for the lifetime of the crop. Miscanthus spreads naturally by means of underground storage organs known as rhizomes. •Harvesting - All propagation, maintenance and harvest operations can be done with conventional farm machinery, but dedicated Miscanthus planters produce the most even establishment. •Water Access Requirements - Annual rainfall and soil water retention will strongly influence t